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For my region in India, Google Earth tiles belong to different years, 2003 - 2010. I don't mean GE's historical view feature but the imagery updates for different areas my region.

I classify Landsat data for particular types of vegetation and check out the effectiveness by overlaying the vectorized layer on Google Earth. Since I use 2010's Landsat data I want to see my layers overlaid on Google Earth's 2010's tiles when available and 2003's tiles not to appear at all. Will it be possible to do this? If yes, how can I do that?

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At this moment there is no acceptable answer for this question. Still to maintain 100% accept rate I am accepting the sole answer below. –  Chethan S. Jun 13 '11 at 23:38
    
it is of course your perogative, perhaps you just really like nice round, complete and green numbers {grin}, but there is no directive like "thou shalt strive to accept an answer for all questions!" –  matt wilkie Jun 14 '11 at 18:21
    
Yeah, I like to see that green number.:) But many are really answers. –  Chethan S. Jun 14 '11 at 22:48
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up vote 1 down vote accepted

sounds like a feature request to me ;-) In the event the direct answer to your question is "No you can't do that" I'd take a look at the NASA World Wind project and see if anyone there knows about (or can construct) access to Landsat layers by year. The data is all public after all.

Not as convenient of course, but USGS Earth Explorer lets you select imagery by year with Landsat Look (pre-computed natural color or thermal composite) as a download option.

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My concern is not to look at the year-by-year Landsat layers but to overlay the vectorized raster(as KML) which are a result of image classification operations carried out on Landsat data i.e., I want to check how my layers look on particular year's high resolution GE data. –  Chethan S. Jun 10 '11 at 4:57
    
Oohhh, that is the reverse of what I understood. In that case You should add that to the question. –  matt wilkie Jun 10 '11 at 18:05
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