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I am trying to generate spatially downscaled (5-10 arcminutes) future climate maps indicating monthly mean min and max temp, and precip. Most people usually need to extrapolate monthly data into daily data (using for eg. MarkSim). I just need the monthly. There are various ways to do this using GCM data available on the internet, but I would like to try doing it using .cli files available from the DSSAT crop modeling program. I don't know how to get access to these files though. Do I have to install DSSAT to get the files? Once I have the files, how do I convert them to a format readable by matlab or arcgis (hopefully ASCII)?

Thanks

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This seems pretty obscure, have you considered contacting the authors directly? –  blah238 Sep 10 '12 at 8:07
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Get DSSAT it is free dssat.net/772 In DSSAT you need to select externally generated weather data in the simulation controls in order for the model to find the data. dssat.net/739 –  Mapperz Sep 10 '12 at 13:31
    
As for the data import in matlab etc, most programs will have the option to export to csv or something similar in which case reading the data should not be a problem. –  Dennis Jaheruddin Nov 14 '12 at 14:15

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Perhaps this website would be useful for future climate data to meet your specific needs:

http://www.ccafs-climate.org/

I haven't downloaded data from here yet, but it does appear to have the very latest available data.

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I am using CCAFS data for future climate projections. What I need and am asking about here is baseline climate data. And yes, I can confirm first hand that CCAFS is a great (perhaps the only?) source for GCM generated future climates, downscaled to high resolutions. But beware of the considerable differences from one GCM's projection to another! And, at this early stage, be wary of the shortcomings of the current downscaling methods. –  ben Dec 2 '12 at 3:14

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