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I wish to familiarize myself with the capabilities of QGIS.

I have downloaded the program, but apart from basic loading of data, I am lost (even after reading the help file).

Can you recommend me some good web resources and tutorials that would show me QGIS' capabilities?

I am particularly interested in developing applications using QGIS.

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locked by PolyGeo Aug 27 '15 at 9:24

This question's answers are a collaborative effort: if you see something that can be improved, just edit the answer to improve it! No additional answers can be added here

    
I think the obvious place to start would be the User Guide and Training Manual for QGIS itself. As an ArcGIS user, you should be well versed in what a GIS is, what layers are, etc...After that you should be left with specific questions of 'How do I do X in QGIS?', which may have already been asked and answered here. – Evil Genius Apr 18 at 14:53
    
If you open the "testing" docs here, they are soon to be released as 2.14 docs, so I would rather work with these than with the 2.8 ones since they have seen a lot of work in the last months. Especially if you start a new project now you will want to use QGIS 2.14 which will soon be LTR (and 2.8 will reach end of life). – Matthias Kuhn Apr 18 at 15:56

19 Answers 19

For users:

For developers:

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Here you have great manual for beginning: A Gentle Introduction to GIS Brought to you with Quantum GIS, a Free and Open Source Software GIS Application for everyone; by T. Sutton, O. Dassau, M. Sutton

Video lectures for that manual can be found here

  1. GISTUTOR.COM site offers well-made tutorial "step by step" with the information how to perform each task (not only about Qgis)
  2. On the Quantum Wiki there is section How do I do that in QGIS
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Last two links appear to be dead. – Resting in Shade Jan 12 at 18:31

I can highly recommend "the QGIS book" Desktop GIS: Mapping the Planet with Open Source Tools by Gary E. Sherman http://www.pragprog.com/titles/gsdgis/desktop-gis

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The Geospatial Desktop book is revised version of the book you mentioned. – radek Jan 24 '12 at 16:07

Check out the:

  • QGIS Manual - all features are described in detail
  • PyQGIS Cookbook - if you want to dive into creating python scripts and plugins
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This One has step by step tutorial. Hope you like it.

QGIS

http://www.qgistutorials.com/en

Quickstart

Making a Map Working with Attributes Importing Spreadsheets or CSV files Using Plugins Searching and Downloading OpenStreetMap Data

Basics GIS operations

Basic Vector Styling Calculating Line Lengths and Statistics Basic Raster Styling and Analysis Raster Mosaicing and Clipping Working with Terrain Data Working with WMS Data Georeferencing Topo Sheets and Scanned Maps Georeferencing Aerial Imagery Digitizing Map Data

Intermediate GIS operations

Performing Table Joins Performing Spatial Joins Points in Polygon Analysis Performing Spatial Queries Creating Heatmaps

Advanced GIS operations

Nearest Neighbor Analysis Sampling Raster Data using Points or Polygons Batch Processing using Processing Framework

Tips and Tricks

Using the QGIS Browser Counting Number of Vertices in a Layer Open BIL, BIP or BSQ files in QGIS

Python Scripting (PyQGIS)

Getting Started With Python Programming Find Neighbor Polygons in a Layer

Web Mapping

Leaflet Web Maps with qgis2leaf Using Google Maps Engine Connector for QGIS

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I have used and still use Ujaval's tutorials for almost all my tasks with QGIS. This page is highly recommended for those who are starting with QGIS along others who are more familiar. His tutorials are well connected and makes everything easier. – Gus Velasco Aug 27 '14 at 12:15

The Free QuantumGIS Training manual by Tim Sutton at linfiniti is excellent.

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We're looking for long answers that provide some explanation and context. Don't just give a one-line answer; explain why your answer is right, ideally with citations. Answers that don't include explanations may be removed.

Updated Post (10th October 2014) 2014 Tutorial and Tips

This is a very easy to follow set of Tutorials for QGIS (2014)

This includes the following sections:

Quickstart

    Making a Map
    Working with Attributes
    Importing Spreadsheets or CSV files
    Using Plugins
    Searching and Downloading OpenStreetMap Data

Basics GIS operations

    Basic Vector Styling
    Calculating Line Lengths and Statistics
    Basic Raster Styling and Analysis
    Raster Mosaicing and Clipping
    Working with Terrain Data
    Working with WMS Data
    Georeferencing Topo Sheets and Scanned Maps
    Georeferencing Aerial Imagery
    Digitizing Map Data

Intermediate GIS operations

    Performing Table Joins
    Performing Spatial Joins
    Points in Polygon Analysis
    Performing Spatial Queries
    Creating Heatmaps

Advanced GIS operations

    Nearest Neighbor Analysis
    Sampling Raster Data using Points or Polygons
    Batch Processing using Processing Framework

QGIS Tutorials and Tips website

http://www.qgistutorials.com/en/

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I wouldn't recommend using sources from 2007. Too much has changed since then. – underdark Nov 19 '10 at 8:04
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And the web site is dead!! – Vassilis May 3 '14 at 8:37

QGIS was my introduction to all of this, and I got my self started with the material on the QGIS site - http://www.qgis.org/en/documentation/manuals.html

The development of the software in recent months has left quite a lot of the third-party tutorial material behind but the changes have all been added features rather than a radical re-design so working through some of the older tutorials will give you a good grounding in the basics and prepare you to dip into the manuals when you're ready to do more adventurous stuff.

As you get more confident, its worth having a good GRASS reference to hand, like "Opensource GIS a GRASS Approach" by Neteler and Mitasova, and "PostGIS in Action" by Obe and Hsu (Manning).

And finally, its worth tracking the "QGIS Planet" blog for more technical and development stuff.

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a bit advanced: Programming and QGIS

general:

QGIS-SEXTANTE cookbook

QGIS Tutorials and Tips

This one is better suited for beginners: QGIS 2.0 WORKSHOP

Great resource for developing plugins: QGIS Workshop

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Video tutorials for QGIS 2.2 (QGIS in under 10 minutes): https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLNCPalajQvg7wQvzf3fM8fOZ5lMKl86Q4

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We're looking for long answers that provide some explanation and context. Don't just give a one-line answer; explain why your answer is right, ideally with citations. Answers that don't include explanations may be removed.

For QGis C++ development there is little information, but still here is what I've found:

-Official API doc

-GitHub code example (pretty old, 2008, if I'm not mistaken it's for QGis 1.8 and earlier versions)

-Coding Compilation guide (pretty old too. For Qgis 1.6, called before Quantum Gis)

-QGis C++ plugin development examples

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A very good source is locate Press. The company specialized in books about the Qgis and GIS. It has some titles that have come out and some that are under publication and of course all is printed and e-book. The book of locate Press is:

  • The Geospatial Desktop Open Source GIS and Mapping The QGIS Training
  • Manual A Comprehensive Introduction to Quantum GIS
  • Geospatial Power Tools Open Source GDAL / OGR Command Line Utilities
  • The PyQGIS Programmer's Guide Extending QGIS with Python
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Here you can find nice video tutorials (and they are quite up to date)

http://foss4geo.wordpress.com/

The topics are:

  • Introduction to geospatial technology
  • Spatial analysis
  • Data management,
  • Cartography
  • Remote sensing
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Tutorial QuantumGIS/GRASS

Introduction to Quantum GIS (Titan) Version 0.8.0

Is for older versions but can help you starting using Qgis

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Both links here seem to be broken. – PolyGeo Oct 10 '14 at 23:36

This web-based workshop from Lex Berman at Harvard's CGA has been helpful to me. http://maps.cga.harvard.edu/qgis/

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We're looking for long answers that provide some explanation and context. Don't just give a one-line answer; explain why your answer is right, ideally with citations. Answers that don't include explanations may be removed.

I'm running a free online eCourse called "QGIS for Newbies".

The course is video based (close captioned) and also has additional downloadable course materials.

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I needed to review QGIS for its potential on a project. I found the few books available to be quite useful for getting started on the software. As with any book it will fall behind the software updates, but the core doesn't change that much. I was more interested in PyQGIS (e.g. QGIS Python Programming Cookbook), but there are also some for the software itself.

The ones from Packt publishing are generally decent, and 'reasonably' priced. I was usually able to access the ebook version from my local university's library.

See for example:

https://www.packtpub.com/application-development/qgis-example https://www.packtpub.com/application-development/learning-qgis-20 https://www.packtpub.com/application-development/mastering-qgis

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I started with this recently. It might be outdated slightly in terms of the version it was wrote around but it explains all the basics in a simple yet comprehensive manner.

It will allow you to start producing maps immediately.

Link - QGIS Training Manuel

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With your experience with ArcGIS, the transition to QGIS should be quite rapid, and the ability to relate operations to a client will be very straightforward.

Programming, or scripting in QGIS or ArcGIS just takes practice, and an understanding of the object models.

I am a big fan of the books by Anita Graser, Joel Lawhead, and Eric Westra. They have all been a big help to me, as has this site. There are some great people here!

Packt Publishing, and LocatePress are good resources for QGIS information.

I have found that I am able to accomplish certain specific tasks in a shorter amount of time in QGIS, than I was in ArcGIS, even though I was much more familiar with what I was doing in ArcGIS at the time.

I have a very strict set of rules that I adhere to with any GIS package I use. All of my data is in the same projection. I do not like re-projecting on the fly. It has bitten me a few too many times in the past. All of my imagery is in the CRS (Coordinate Reference System) of the project. I am also able to share data, projects, settings, and so on with others without the fear of misplaced data.

I will re-project the data for export, only if requested, otherwise, they get the data in the projection I am working with.

I have found myself building the same projects in QGIS, as well as ArcGIS, even when I am required to work in ArcGIS.

My biggest problems have been the difference in SQL, and the expression builders. Certain queries work in QGIS that do not work in ArcGIS, and vice versa.

I have upgraded everything to QGIS 2.14.1, and have had very few problems.

I am very interested in seeing where QGIS goes when version 3.0 is released, and how the transition to Python 3+ will affect some of my code/scripts. I have heard rumors that ESRI will be adopting QT (C++, and Python bindings) for development of add-ins, and scripting, but I cannot confirm this. Either way, learning Python is not a waste of time, no matter what version.

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