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Using the world map data from Natural Earth I have some problems with the correct displaying in QGIS.

Shapefiles added:

  • 1:10 Admin Countries
  • 1:10 Oceans

As you can see in my screenshot, there are some mistakes:

  • A strange circle appears (small red frame)
  • Russia ist not shown
  • The ocean layer is only shown for the Caucasian Sea (blue polygon)

On some scales or projections the ocean is illustrated but up to now, I have not detected when and why this happens. The added shapefiles are not edited or rendered dependend on scale.

enter image description here

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1  
Can you tell us the QGIS version and your OS? –  A.R Jan 7 '13 at 18:58
    
It is 1.8.0 Lisboa and my OS is Windows 7. –  Gideon Jan 7 '13 at 19:17
    
Have you tried to view these Shapefiles in any ESRI product like free ArcGIS explorer? –  vadivelan Jan 7 '13 at 19:17
2  
The circle is a country feature identified as the "Baykonur Cosmodrome"; it really is part of that shapefile. I cannot reproduce the rendering problems in QGIS 1.8.0, but it is apparent from the screenshot that an unusual projection has been selected: it appears to be a projection specifically for only a small part of the world. Which one is it and how was it applied to the dataset? –  whuber Jan 7 '13 at 19:26

2 Answers 2

up vote 5 down vote accepted

For the missing ocean, the answer is simple: you have selected EPSG:3857 or another transverse mercator projection as project CRS. Theses CRS are not defined at north and south pole, which is part of the ocean shapefile. Switch to EPSG:4326, and you see all seas.

Maybe the same appies for Russia.

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The "Strange Circle" is the Baikonur Cosmodrome. It's a polygon in the Natural Earth data set. It's a space launch platform owned by Kazakhstan and is leased to Russia until 2050.

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