Take the 2-minute tour ×
Geographic Information Systems Stack Exchange is a question and answer site for cartographers, geographers and GIS professionals. It's 100% free, no registration required.

This map is not using OpenLayers, just MapServer with a mapfile.

There is a layer that displays both the point and the label.

Looking through the documentation, I'm not entirely sure what the best way is.

Edit: Ideally (not even sure if this is possible), I would like to disable the label for the first two zoom levels but display the associated point. Is this even possible if they are tied together as one layer?

Edit2: Looks like LABELMAXSCALEDENOM is what I'm looking for, but how to configure correctly? I know it's

 LABELMAXSCALEDENOM integer

but how do you exactly know the scale of your map?

Currently:

MAP
  SIZE 128 768
    EXTENT -180 -90 180 90

I tried LABELMAXSCALEDENOM equal to some different integers. Didn't notice any difference: the labels were just gone completely, no matter what the zoom.

Any input is appreciated.

share|improve this question
add comment

2 Answers 2

LABELMAXSCALEDENOM 500000

This works for what I want (disable labels for first two zoom levels but leave points), but I still don't really understand the math aspect behind it, given I know the size and extent. Was just randomly trying numbers and 500000 seemed to work. If anyone could offer some insight on SCALEDENOM in relation to SIZE and EXTENT, it would be appreciated.

share|improve this answer
1  
Randomly trying numbers is the method I have found to be best, in addition to copy the values from existing mapfiles. If you are really interested, this mapserver-users thread deals with WMS scale calculations mail-archive.com/mapserver-users@lists.umn.edu/msg14413.html –  user30184 May 20 at 10:38
add comment

Scale calculations are difficult when you operate with longitude-latitude (decimal degrees) for the MAP. If you look at a map of the world in a longitude-latitude "projection", the scale in the east-west direction will become larger as you get closer to the poles.

share|improve this answer
1  
Very good point, one which I did not realize when I asked this question :) –  DfnD Dec 10 '13 at 21:03
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.