Hot answers tagged

9

Script: import arcpy, traceback, sys, os pntFile=arcpy.GetParameterAsText(0) rasters=arcpy.GetParameterAsText(1) rasters=rasters.split(';') theFields=[x.name.lower() for x in arcpy.ListFields(pntFile)] result=arcpy.GetCount_management(pntFile) nF=int(result.getOutput(0)) p=arcpy.Point() try: def showPyMessage(): arcpy.AddMessage(str(time.ctime(...


7

Any OpenGL card should work well, whether NVidia or AMD. This quote from ArcGIS Desktop Help, gives a basic discussion of what graphics card you should buy for 3D Analyst: Which graphics card should I buy? A good OpenGL-compliant graphics card with at least 64 MB of texture memory is recommended. Most desktop systems come equipped with power ...


7

To close a multipatch feature, it must completely enclose a volume. Multipatch features created with the Interpolate multipatch to polygon (using a surface) tool can likely not be closed. (Unless you extrude between 2 TIN surfaces which should produce a closed multipatch. Personally, I have not had a lot of success using "Extrude Between" with complex ...


7

Viewshed analysis calculates the number of observers that can see a given location. No identification is given as which observers can see that location. The result is simply a single numeric value. If you have 10 viewpoints, then your resultant raster will have values in the range 0 - 10. Observer Points calculates visibility in the same way but the ...


6

You should see a value which the image is stretched by when you add it to ArcMap, as in this: Then by switching to stretch type min-max you will see a more accurate elev value, as in this: which produces this: A nice touch then is to use the USGS color palette to show elev. For this:


6

You can build a terrain dataset from points or lines as well as ASCII grids. No need to convert to LAS points, all you need is a multipoint feature class (which can be created from any of the above).


6

You're not actually 'reprojecting' the data (the coordinate system, that is), you're simply multiplying it by a constant (as in the 'times' tool in ArcGIS) to change the pixel values from one number to another, so you can use the QGIS Raster Calculator to do this.


6

3D analyst's Add Surface Information will add a Z field to your vector data with the data value from the overlapping raster layer: Interpolates surface elevation properties for point, multipoint, and polyline features. That's for v10, I didn't catch which version of ArcGIS you were using.


5

I think in the end i will stay with the USGS Envison system. Their stand visualization system in fact has a geographical component, but prior to the visualization you have to format your data locations corresponding to your plot size. First create a tbl file with the following parameter (From the Tbl2svs help) The following example shows a stand ...


5

From your diagram it appears that you're interested in the points where the change in gradient is the most. Since the gradient of a line measures the rate of change (i.e. can be considered the derivative), then the gradient of the gradient is the rate of change of the gradient (i.e. can be considered the second derivative). So from this assumption we can say ...


5

Turn on the 3D Graphics toolbar, adjust some of the default text graphics properties before you add a label so that it is added large enough to see/find. Select the 3D Text tool Use the 3D Text tool to click on the feature you want to label, and type in the label you wish to display. Adjust the label properties for orientation and size. I've created ...


5

There is no Layout View in ArcScene. You can export your scene to JPG by using File > Export Scene > 2D... and selecting JPEG in the Save As Type drop-down of the Export Map dialog.


4

Check out the NVS Vector Stream Tool which ... is a user-friendly ArcCatalog (9.3.x) Toolbox geoprocessing tool which simply assigns a numeric order to segments of a poly line feature class. Unlike the Spatial Analyst Tools for Hydrography, this tool solely uses vector stream data instead of raster stream data accompanied by a flow direction ...


4

From my experience (also not a remote sensing expert), it's very hard to get accurate building outlines. If it is not a huge area, it might be worth manually tracing the buildings and then doing a spatial join with the LIDAR data to get the building heights.


4

Perhaps "rasterList" should be "raster" in: arcpy.RasterDomain_3d(rasterList,out_file,geometry) From the documentation it looks like RasterDomain_3d takes only a raster rather than a list.


4

You can try the Virtual Terrain Project. The goal of VTP is to foster the creation of tools for easily constructing any part of the real world in interactive, 3D digital form. This goal will require a synergetic convergence of the fields of CAD, GIS, visual simulation, surveying and remote sensing. VTP gathers information and tracks progress ...


4

According to the licensing information, they probably share the same algorithms Licensing Information ArcGIS for Desktop Basic: Requires 3D Analyst or Spatial Analyst ArcGIS for Desktop Standard: Requires 3D Analyst or Spatial Analyst ArcGIS for Desktop Advanced: Requires 3D Analyst or Spatial Analyst And it can't be done without one of those two ...


4

First you need to enable the extension (if you have the license for this): Create TIN (3D Analyst) http://resources.arcgis.com/en/help/main/10.2/index.html#//00q90000001v000000 You can search for this:


4

you can do this with the raster calculator, but probably not as easy as a sum because you probably have NoData values where there is no forest . In this case, here is a more robust method : Con(IsNull("converted_polygon"), "DEM", "DEM" + "converted_polygon" )


4

If your application is running inside of ArcGIS your product license should handle the activation of extensions for you. Failing that you can always use ArcObjects to check out the required extensions. How to use extensions (ArcObjects) Extensions provide additional functionality to applications. Before using the functionality provided in an extension,...


4

Perhaps one of these two methods will work for you: ArcMAP Select by Location 3D relationships and ArcScene Select by 3D Box How about Inside 3D (3D Analyst)? Since the output of Extrude Between is a feature class with multipatch 3D features, can you use this tool to identify the 3D Point features which are within the resulting soil horizons? Can you ...


4

Per the help file: Hard and soft qualifiers for line and polygon feature types are used to indicate whether a distinct break in slope occurs on the surface at their location. A hard line is a distinct break in slope, while a soft line will be represented on the surface as a more gradual change in slope. See also this KB article, which provides ...


4

You can do this with Hawthorne Beyer's free Geospatial Modelling Environment, (GME, formerly known as Hawth's Tools). There is a tool in there, Intersect Points With Raster, which as its name implies, acts like the Intersect tool in ArcGIS but allows you to intersect a point layer with a raster, like the Extract Values to Points tool. You can also apply an ...


4

The toolbar is designed to work with a "SurveyGeodatabase", which is created in the first step of the Toolbar workflow. Unless you are working with a set of total station data, I think the toolbar is not the right fit for your needs/task. This step in the toolbar actually relies on ESRI's "TIN to Raster" Geoprocessing tool, which can be accessed from ...


3

According to the ArcGIS Resource Center the tool: Tests each multipatch to see if it completely encloses a volume. Then adds a new field with a flag for each multipatch feature in the input layer or feature class indicating if that feature is closed or not. It could be that changing the order of the vertices closes the volume while others don't and ...


3

Sorry for bumping this old question, but a Python module's name cannot begin with a number, so arcpy.3d will never work. To import the module, you'll need to reference ddd: from arcpy.ddd import * or: from arcpy import ddd A geoprocessing tool can be referenced in arcpy by either arcpy._ or arcpy... For 3D Analyst, the toolbox alias is '3d' but the ...


3

The only way we found to get a triangular mesh with existing topology into ArcGIS was to use the arcpy.LandXMLToTin_3d function. It's a bit crazy to have to write out a LandXML file just to get your TIN into Arc, but it works. Here is a Python Toolbox for ArcGIS10.1 that accesses data on a triangular mesh from an ocean model, and brings it into ArcGIS as a ...


3

When features are added to a TIN, there needs to be some way to define where their heights come from. If you are inputting 3D features, you can specify the Shape field as the height source. This indicates the z-values will be taken directly from the feature geometry. When adding 2D features, you can reference a numeric field. You can also specify None, in ...


3

I have successfully used FME in the past to do this type of conversion. I can't remember if there were any other quirks to the translation, but if you've never used it before you would essentially just add the appropriate readers and writers, hook them up and see if it works. In my case I was converting from Google Earth (KMZ) files, which use COLLADA (.dae)...


3

There is no difference between Viewshed-3D and Viewshed-Spatial in terms of functionality. As per page 7 of the functionality matrix here: http://www.esri.com/library/brochures/pdfs/arcgis-server-functionality-matrix.pdf You can add extensions to ArcGIS Server Standard. You'd have to add one of those extensions to do Viewshed. My answer above was for ...



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