Tag Info

New answers tagged

1

GeoServer (and it's undelying library GeoTools) are written in Java so that is the language you will need to use. The labeling engine is part of the GeoTools renderer module so you'll need to study and understand how this code works. Assuming that you would like to eventually add this code to the GeoTools library then you'll need to read the Developer's ...


1

With OpenLayers 2 I just used a method of the OpenLayers-feature to check wether it is within a geofencing-zone.I haven't tried this with ol3. Another option would be turf: https://www.mapbox.com/blog/turf-gis-for-web-maps/ See the section"Water Fountains accessible within xxx feet". Instead of water fountains you could use your gps-position with a buffer ...


0

If your objective is to develop a routing program over the sea returning various maritime routes from (origin,destination) pairs, you should rather rely on a linear mesh covering the seas, instead of polygons. I had exactly the same goal and I did something using: The shipping lane dataset "Oak Ridge National Labs CTA Transportation Network Group, Global ...


0

here's the page that link to lat/long calculations Lat/long calculations also this page Lat/long calculations there's a code + calculator


0

You can identify lines with gaps between endpoints using arcpy Geometry objects (v10.1+). The following returns the distance between endpoints: with arcpy.da.SearchCursor("LINES_FC", "SHAPE@") as cursor: for row in cursor: print arcpy.PointGeometry(row[0].firstPoint).distanceTo(arcpy.PointGeometry(row[0].lastPoint)) Of course, additional code ...


0

I've implemented a rough prototype for map matching here, which is relative easy to use. It is based on the open source routing engine and written in Java. The used algorithm is described here.


1

Some good software for this purpose is TauDEM (Terrain Analysis Using Digital Elevation Models). Main page, with info, publications, and downloads for command tools and optional ArcGIS Toolbox interface Source code on GitHub The software uses both D8 and so-called D-infinity (D∞) flow models, which is best illustrated on Fig. 1 of Tesfa et al. (2011). ...


2

There are a couple of different ways you can do this, and it will vary depending on the software you are using. But in QGIS you can use the Vector Grid tool, which is found in Vector - Research Tools. The tool allows you to set the extent of your working area based on a layer (in your case the polygon layer) and then output either a line or polygon grid ...


0

I have solved a similar problem for a municipality where if a water main breaks they wanted to know where the water goes and what infrastructure, streams, etc. are going to get impacted. If you are using ArcMap then you can use the Cost Path geoprocessing tool. Tool parameters: Input raster or feature destination data - a point representing your spill ...


1

As mentioned by @mdsummer, there is a very good answer to a similar question here If you also need some tolerance on the time in your case, you can modify the distance calculation. Instead of a 2D euclidian distance, use a third dimension for the time. You then compute the distance in a new space that would help you identify "together runners". In order to ...


2

This operation is obviously commutative because its description is entirely in terms of commutative operations. The important, and slightly more interesting, issue concerns whether the operation is associative. Let us temporarily denote this operation by "+". The question is whether for all polygons P, Q, and R it is the case that P + (Q+R) = (P+Q) + ...



Top 50 recent answers are included