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The Topology Checker plugin is a good tool if used correctly. You still have to have a fundamental understanding of your data AND you have to make the 'corrections' manually. The plugin will highlight what it thinks are errors. It is up to you to then examine each and make the appropriate decision for you and your data. With 90 000 items in your layer, you ...


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You can do this in SQL using a spatial self join. You don't state which SQL dialect you are using, so this example uses Postgres/Postgis, but it could be easily adapted to Oracle or SQL Server. Assuming a table called buildings, with geometry stored in a column called geom: SELECT a.id, b.id from buildings a, buildings b WHERE ST_INTERSECTS(a.geom, ...


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I would use Python's itertools and a SearchCursor for a very efficient way to find the spatial relationships you are after. You can incorporate the geometry methods overlaps, contains, and equal to get at the geometry properties. Start off by creating a function to better organize the workflow and for repeatability def findOverlaps(x): Open a search ...


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in QGIS, Topology Checker plugin can propably solve your problem


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I have an idea what may work for you. It is going to be based off some assumptions, but it would help narrow down your list of possible identical features. This would not be an automated process, but it would require manually looking at the duplicates. Based off the comments, it seems like the automated tools don't compare attributes so this would help ...


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I think your logic is a bit flawed you appear to be writing back into the same folder and giving it the name of the shapefile, which makes no sense? Make a subfolder called Output here: C:\Users\kellyj\Desktop\Projects\CostAnalysis\Output Then try this code: import arcpy, os from arcpy.sa import * arcpy.env.workspace = ...



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