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67

Commercial APIs (Google,Bing, Yahoo) Using any commercial API leaves you at the mercy of whatever changes the provider makes to the API or Terms of Service. What happens for example if suddenly your local government portal that uses Google Maps suddenly has adverts popping up all over it? Want to reuse your JavaScript Google Maps code for an Intranet site? ...


37

There is a new player on javascript mapping front - Leaflet. Developed by CloudMade under BSD licence. Looks really promising. (Source) Update: Pretty exhaustive comparison of FOSS libraries by German Carrillo can be found here:


32

I have used both OpenLayers and Leaflet in my apps. There has been so much discussion on this topic in this forum and others on planet-internet. They usually fall into 2 camps - features and flexibility of OpenLayers versus simplicity of Leaflet. I would not be surprised if someone spawns an "OpenLeaf" initiative soon marrying the best of both worlds! I ...


25

Go OpenLayers. I had a Google Maps / arcgis api project and about a year ago, i decided to try openlayers. The more i worked with it the more i saw how awesome it is. So i decided to migrate. I cut down 30 - 100 lines of google code into 1 - 3 lines over and over again throughout my code. Simply because openlayers had funtions for what i wanted to do and was ...


23

Here's a vote for Quantum GIS with GRASS plugin enabled as your desktop application. (QGIS is available on Windows, MacOS X and Linux). OGR/GDAL will take care of nearly any file format. Store all your data on PostgreSQL/ PostGIS and serve it out with Geoserver. Link to QGIS API Documentation.


15

CartoDB is a tool for analyzzing, vizzualising and sharing your geospatial data in PostGIS. It's an open source geospatial database platform that provides an SQL API layer. It allows developers to make querys to a cloud PostrgreSQL + OpenGIS database optimized to geospatial purposes.


14

Probably not. None stand out. Your time would be much better spent learning Django/GeoDjango. Django is similar to Rails in that it's a web application framework. It uses Python rather than Ruby. The geospatial functionality is much more mature than GeoRuby. Ruby/Rails is a great platform to develop on but the spatial functionality isn't on par with ...


14

I did a simple comparison a year ago showing eleven different geocoding services, free ones as well as pay services, and the results are in a google spreadsheet. I work at SmartyStreets, so you'll see that listed in the first column but not in first place. I tried to make the comparison unbiased so the results are actually useful. I have now opened the ...


13

The ArcSDE APIs date from the earliest days of ArcSDE. It was how you interacted with the data stored in a RDBMS. This was before there were ArcToolbox tools or many ArcObjects classes and methods. Because of this, the ArcSDE APIs have almost no support for geodatabase objects beyond points,lines,polygons--no feature datasets, network datasets, etc. The ...


12

One more time, you should also include Mapquery to your list (based on top of jQuery). Vmx clone seems to be particularly active. By the way, I would provide again Laurent Jegou's benchmark (PDF, french). It is a global outlook on web mapping solutions (both client and server). Regarding your need, it can be a good start to exclude some of them. edit June ...


12

Leaflet all the way. I feel like Leaflet is the next step on the evolution of the open source tile based browser clients. Ka-Map -> OpenLayers -> Leaflet. Leaflet is simple to use and does exactly what it says on the tin. OpenLayers has become bloated by trying to to be all things to all people, Leaflet does the 20% of things that are required 80% of the ...


11

OpenLayers is the best IMHO. You can easily make WFS calls to an WFS service. If you want to just return data and not map features, you can also do this. Or map features without the data, or both. here are some examples: http://openlayers.org/dev/examples/getfeature-wfs.html http://openlayers.org/dev/examples/wfs-filter.html


9

It's all about the memory limitations of 32-bit architectures. The benefit of 64-bit support is that you get access to 16 terabytes of virtual memory compared with 4 gigabytes in a 32-bit architecture. You also get access to more paging file space, system cache, etc. It would be necessary to use the 64-bit version of the File Geodatabase API if you were ...


9

I compare (with highlights & notes) the code required to do a simple, specific & common task in: MapQuest Google Maps bing Ovi Esri OpenLayers jQuery Geo here: http://trippingthebits.com/geopres/ The post is for a presentation I gave on jQuery Geo, which is sadly missing from your list.


9

i am currently developping a rails app with some mapping capabilities, and i really love ruby and RoR, but sadly enough there is very little plugins mature enough for a complex WMS/WFS service. But i just want to add that the recent rGeo library does quite a good job with projections (proj4 bindings and ability to use other APIs), integrates smoothly with ...


9

Google Maps works so well because some clever people spent time making something incredibly complex appear to be simple. Switching to a new mapping API isn't going to automatically make your web map nicer to use - some alternative suggestions: Rather than making a mega-application with every possible layer, make a series of smaller, focussed apps Find ...


8

I'm not competent to do a full comparison, but I've done three different small projects with Polymaps and can comment on that. Its main strength is it makes it very easy to composite raster and vector data from many different sources. It can meet all your requirements, particularly in letting you easily add your own colouring, grouping, and interaction. ...


8

I'd like to know a bit more. Licensing can be an issue with some of the libraries. Others you can look at are deCatra and Cloudmade.


8

You can use the IGeodatabaseRelease2 interface on a workspace to determine the version. It has the properties MajorVerison and MinorVersion. The MajorVersion is offset from the ArcGIs version by 7: Dim pGDBRelease As ESRI.ArcGIS.Geodatabase.IGeodatabaseRelease2 = pWorkspace System.Windows.Forms.MessageBox.Show(pGDBRelease.MajorVersion + 7 ...


8

You can use the Streetdirectory API "The easiest way to start learning about the SD Maps API is to see a simple example. The following web page displays a map centered on Streetdirectory Singapore Office, 305 Alexandra Road, Vantage Automotive Centre, Singapore 159942: " Simple Map http://www.streetdirectory.com/api/developer/docs/examples/map-simple.html ...


8

How about firing up an EC2 or rackspace instance and installing the EarthExplorer bulk download application: http://earthexplorer.usgs.gov/bulk/ You could hit the EarthExplorer service with a POST request to submit jobs programmatically: http://earthexplorer.usgs.gov/subscription/submit/ You would need to provide standingRequestName, frequency, ...


7

I wouldn't hold my breath. They have been saying "really soon now" since 2007.


7

I you want to visualize a globe within the browser Cesium is a nice one. (Works without plugin but browser Needs WebGL support) Can display 3D, 2D and 2.5D view Support for different raster/vector formats (KML etc.) Free control the Camera and Camera flights ... and everything within (modern) browsers.


7

I like Esri's ArcGIS API for Microsoft Silverlight/WPF, and also the ArcGIS Viewer for Silverlight. You can use Bing with these, or base maps from ArcGIS.com. Also, consider using SQL Server 2008 with Sql Server Management studio to prototype spatial sql queries. Isaac Kunen's blog is a good resource. Best when used with the Sql Server Spatial Tools from ...


7

There appear to be 7 major "POI" databases which have a large quantity of API-accessible POI data in the US. (Cribbing much of this from http://www.quora.com/What-are-the-pros-and-cons-of-each-Places-API) Yelp CitySearch Facebook Foursquare Google SimpleGeo, Factual Depending on what you are looking for, these each offer different benefits. Yelp, ...


7

Strictly from a learning perspective, learning something new is always worthwhile. However, Ruby/Ruby on Rails isn't extremely popular in the GIS world. Because of lack of popularity, I would suggest you pick up another language instead, such as Python, if your goal is to learn something new. I don't think you'll find any GIS-specific advantages to ...


7

You have a couple of options; the choice of which will depend on your data model, the type of data to be served, the intended usage model, access control as well as the platform of delivery (Web, HTML, Java Server, IIS, static data set). Extend an existing product to consume your data set. You could look at hosting a GeoServer instance on your (or ...


7

By API, I presume you mean some sort of network access to your data through an HTTP POST/GET type affair such as the Google Maps API? Will it be raster or vector data? I'll assume vector for the purposes of this discussion. This is really just a communication protocol rather than an Application Programming Interface. You won't need to design anything from ...


7

Some places like Twitter connect geographical data with the content ("tweets" in this case). If you use the API to request a list of recent tweets, it will give you geographical data along with it ("coordinates", "geo" in the JSON response): Twitter API Example I suspect most of the data you're referring to is collected similarly. Basically, find a ...


6

I would highly reccomend deCarta (I also work there). We powered google maps, yahoo maps and a ton of other people. We just announced new pricing. We expose our geocoding (and reverse geocoding) through many different apis. We also have worldwide coverage. http://developer.decarta.com Feel free to drop me a line if you have any other questions. I will be ...



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