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2

use the equivelant cursor without .da. http://help.arcgis.com/en/arcgisdesktop/10.0/help/index.html#//000v00000039000000 ex: shapefieldname = arcpy.Describe(featureclass).ShapeFieldName sCur = arcpy.SearchCursor(featureclass, {where_clause}, {spatial_reference}, {fields}, {sort_fields}) for row in sCur: feature = row.getValue(shapefieldname) ...


1

You can only symbolize by a maximum of 3 fields, and to do that you need to select: Unique values, many fields Under Categories, on the left side of the window. But, if you want to symbolize based on the 15+ fields in your screenshot, you might want to rethink your approach. You could always create a new field, and field calc the values of all the other ...


0

you shouldn't be losing information, but it does want you to pick which thing you are classifying by. You couldn't classify by the description or comments fields for example, that wouldn't even be possible. I know one thing we often did in class was to do reclassifications that take the values in the selected field and redistribute it like a 1-10 scale for ...


1

Thanks for all the great ideas. Unfortunately I was stuck using arcGIS as getting admin privileges at my workplace is near impossible. Basically what I ended up doing was appending 100 files at a time rather than 1 at a time. This reduced the runtime to just over 24 hours.


1

That depends on you data resolution and computer specifications including RAM and processing power. It took me about 1-day to do a college campus at about 2m resolution. I cannot link to GeoNet as it is behind a log in wall but on this forum I found that, "We are using the tool to calculate direct and diffuse incoming solar radiation for a valley in the ...


2

Consider using Dissolve. This will write the output to a new feature class but it may be more efficient. In my experience dissolve operations have taken less time than merge. Run a benchmark to determine which is faster. There may be some issue with merge/dissolve wrt to performance and dissolving circular arcs (such as results of buffering points, ...


1

I am probably late but it may be helpful to others. I was in need of the same functionality in 10.2 that we had in ArcView 3.2, in winch we can cut, union, merge, clip, intersect, and other overlaying operations directly inside the editing session. I have just found my way by following this procedure (providing you have ArcEditor, as I do and do not know if ...


2

As from the comment, you could loop on each feature then run the selection by location on a feature layer. There are different types of loops for this purpose 1) based on a selection by attribute for each FID in a feature layer or 2) directly based on the geometry in a cursor. Here is the code with a cursor, which is more straightforward IMHO. You get the ...


1

Try lastools. Many parts are free and you could BLAST2EM and get just get what you need. Do not try to interpolate lidar in ArcGIS unless you are prepared for a long wait. You have a robust set of options and it runs from command line. It will use the TIN approach to create your dem. It is fast and efficient.


2

First, if needed, create a LAS Dataset from your .las files. Then use LAS Dataset to Raster, select Average for a DEM output.


1

I realize this question was closed long ago, but I have some old tools that this was newly a problem for and the SendKeys solution no longer seems to work, so I rolled my own solution after experimenting. It doesn't disable drawing, but creates the performance equivalent of that by disabling layers and reenabling them when done. Having the script run in the ...


1

Style files can be loaded from anywhere on your system. There are two schools of thought here. keep them where the system style files are and the system can get to them easily. Keep them on a shared drive where everybody can get to them and add to them. There are plusses and minuses to both. I adhere to No. 2. Sharing is better. In Customize there ...


4

Apparently RefName never equals your comparison strings. All constant strings includes German characters ä or ü, but you don't use the "u" constant string prefix. Depending on the incoming string's format the comparison might not be what you expekt. You should write if RefName==u"Flächen für die Landwirdshaft" and make sure that RefName also is a correct ...


-1

I think you should check the "remove bad geometries" checkbox. There might be geometry issues with some of your routes or points dataset.


-1

I don't think this option is available in version 10 of Arcmap


3

In theory this is a "solved" problem from a SysAdmin perspective. Any good monitoring package can monitor things, it just depends on identifying things to monitor (for which it helps having well documented protocols; ArcGIS's proprietary services make things somewhat tricker). http://www.thegeekstuff.com/2009/09/top-5-best-network-monitoring-tools/ - ...


1

I'm not aware of any existing tools, but you can find information in the server logs if a context has failed to start or failed to connect to datasource (depending on logging level). They are available in C:\Program Files (x86)\ArcGIS\Server10.0\server\user\log (or where your install dir is). You could either just scan through the textfiles or use Arcobjects ...


3

Assuming that your points are in order, and that this works at 10.0 (I'm using 10.2): Field Calculator Expression: dist( !Shape! ) Field Calculator Code Block: count = 0 def dist(shape): global prev global count point = arcpy.PointGeometry(shape.getPart(0)) if count > 0: distance = point.distanceTo(prev) else: ...


2

I gave a fairly detailed description of how these types of stream network operations work in my previous answer here. But if you're looking for the exact algorithmic solution for how stream cells are recognized in the stream link raster and how confluences (junctions) are spotted in the network then you may look at the following source code as examples: ...


3

In addition to @Ryan Garnett answer, you can convert the VRT file to BIGTIFF using gdal_translate if you absolutely need a unique file (this is often not necessary as most software can read vrt's). Just make sure that you use gdal_translate -co BIGTIFF=YES -co TILED=YES source.vrt result.tif if your tif exceed 4 Go


1

One way to merge your lines is to use the "integrate" tools. Be carefull when you use this tool because it modifies the input data. If you want to detect those lines, you could use integrate on a copy of your original data, the you run "intersect" between the original and the integrated data : the result will only include the lines that were not moved by ...


1

I had the same problem. The solution I found was to go into Data Frame Properties click the Coordinate System tab and then double-click on the projection you are using to bring up the Projected Coordinate System Properties window and change the Linear Unit (it's a drop down near the middle) to feet or yards or whatever unit you want. It will still be greyed ...


2

You can only set the transparency if you symbolize say a point feature as a chart which in your case is pie chart. Please see the Symbology tab of your feature class. After this, you can set the transparency of your feature class from the Display tab and this will reflect on the pie charts.


1

Think about the bigger picture - GIS data is just a means to an end for most people, especially when it comes to government entities. My experience has been that relationship classes are primarily useful (and appropriate) when you need to incorporate non-spatial data with one:many relationships to your spatial data, especially if it is from an external ...


0

Note that in your case you could also select by attribute "TESTFIELD"='0' (select by attribute), then update only those values with field calculator. If you have a vera large table and very few cases with "TESTFIELD"='0' , it could be faster.


3

The code should work, just add the colon after if statement and proper indentation: def RemoveNULLS(x, v): if x == '0': return v else: return x RemoveNULLS( !TESTFIELD!, !TESTFIELDBEREGNER!) Be careful with what data type used for the x (if it is an integer, you cannot use '0', should be 0).


0

you can use this python script at filed calculator to find identical and then delete them (just ad qa filed short type ) : d = [] def isDuplicate(t): import string global d iD = 0 for item in d: if item == t: iD = 1 continue if iD == 1: return 1 elif iD == 0: d.append(t) return ...


0

You can compute the area using a right-click on a field > calculate geometry. Then you summarize your attribute table using the building name as a case field : you can then ask for the sum of the area. Finally, use a table join (join by attribute) the have the total area of each building, which you can copy if needed in a new field. If you don't have an ...


0

I have resolved the issue so I thoughht i'd close this by sharing the answer. 1) the "null" values on all rows but the first one Thanks to Richard Fairhurst in the commenting section on the Patch tip. The patch fixed it. 2) returning the count value of points per line segment in my model, I had to: use the 'Repeat Victimsation (Geographical) tool from ...


0

what type of data source are you querying? Is it SDE/File geodtabase? You may try placing single quotes around the {0} in your statement. Example from ESRI: " \"CITY_NAME\" = 'Chicago' " In your case, try this (haven't validated it but worth a shot, I switched it to double quotes and escaped the internal double quotes, then added the string into single ...


1

It always helps to include the error message you're getting with the script, so I'm guessing a bit, but the correct format for your SQL where clause is probably '"LCC_DRN_ID" = \'{0}\''.format(point_id) Note that you don't have to escape the double quotes with the slash because you're using single quotes for the overall SQL string, but you do need to ...


2

Algorithms for performing stream network analysis all work in a similar way. These tools will use the D8 flow direction (Fdr) grid to navigate through a defined raster stream network (Str) using the network of flow paths defined by the D8 flow direction. Essentially what a link classification tool will do is scan the raster, usually starting from the ...


2

You first need to interpolate your precipitation values to a continuous surface. Then you can use the contour tool to create your isohyete. For contour lines (where you want something visually attractive), the smoothness and the generalisation are important, so I recommend using a spline function for the interpolation. However, this is not necessarily the ...


0

Are you sure is not that the "Factor to convert layer elevation values to scene units", in the "Base Heights" tab, is changing to another number? If you are using geographical coordinates and meters, try using 0.000015 as value.


0

I had an issue where the editor would not even select a certain point feature. I would have to select it with the "Select Feature" tool and then it could be moved but it would still not snap to the line feature. Not sure why this worked but I turned on a different point feature and was able to select it with the editor and could snap it. When I went back ...


1

Much like jbsoq. 1) Convert the x,y data to a shapefile, here is the tutorial. 2) "Sample" or "Extract Multi Values to Points" to get the raster into the point shapefile. I prefer multi value. 3) Run Exploratory Regression on the data and his will give you most of what you want. 4) You now have the original values and the raster values in the attribute ...


1

To add to msi_g's answer above: since you have multiple rasters you can use Extract Multi Values to Points then add a field to the attribute table of the point data and calculate whatever you want for all points individually, but you will have to type out the equation yourself. Also be cautious with multiple rasters that projections are the same and rasters ...


4

There is a tool called Find Identical (Data Management) that does exactly what you are after. The tool adds a new field to the output feature class indicating the status.


3

Use the Delete Identical tool. In the syntax you specify the field you want to look for duplicates in and ArcMap deletes all but one of them automatically. You can also use the Find Identical tool to just find the identical features and delete them manually if you would like to check the results yourself.


3

You will want to create a ToolControl button that allows you to click on a map as opposed to a button which does something when you click on it. Then grab the point, create a spatialfilter and query your polygon layer, this returns a Feature object which you can return the various address components and populate some form that you created. The bold words ...


2

You might consider using the Visibility Index, which is a measure of the size of the viewshed for each pixel in a DEM. This way you could measure the overall visibility of a pathway or route. I wrote a blog on the calculation of the visibility index and some of the challenges involved that you might find useful here: ...


1

Works with this using System; using System.Collections.Generic; using System.Linq; using System.Text; using ESRI.ArcGIS.Geodatabase; using ESRI.ArcGIS.esriSystem; namespace SDEtest { class Program { static void Main(string[] args) { ESRI.ArcGIS.RuntimeManager.BindLicense(ESRI.ArcGIS.ProductCode.EngineOrDesktop); ...


1

I don't have an elegant answer but have a couple ideas that may send you in the right direction. Skyline in conjunction with Skyline Graph could get you close (requires 3D Analyst extension). Skyline uses the same line of sight principle. Search radius can be set (max_horizon_radius) and azimuth values should work to enforce the 8-tuple, but the tricky part ...


0

Assuming you know the coordinates of your data points you should be able to write it all up in an excel sheet. using the following column names: longitude latitude placename temperature The Excel sheet can then be used to plot points using ArcGIS or QGIS (the pen source equivalent of ArcGIS).For the ArcGIS software ESRI has made a fairly straightforward ...


3

You can georeference a JPG image if you can identify parts of the image in another basemap or geo-referenced dataset of any kind. Get the georeferencing toolbar from the Customize Menu. When you bring the image in (add it like you would any other data) it won't match anything spatially so you will need to match areas in the JPEG with areas in your basemap ...


1

You can add your jpg in ArcGIS like any other image (add data). Now, for making a map, you'll need a georeferenced image. There are two main methods: if you know (from metadata) where your image should be, create a world file with .jgw extension (e.g. using notepad) and the same name as your image. The structure of the file is xsize rotation ...


2

You left out the case where calculation == .001. I also recommend trying the abs function to simplify your logic: if abs(calculation) <= 0.001: # ... else: # ... Side note: you don't need a layer to be created - cursors (both flavors) support defining a where expression when you create them.


5

The current conditional seems to be interpreted as "if the condition is less than -0.001, or if condition is > 0.001 as well as linkup being blank". If the condition is negative (e.g. calculation = -30) then Python is essentially deciding it's met the first condition and it therefore does not need to look at the subsequent conditions. if (calculation < ...


8

I would group with parens as follows if (calculation < -0.001 or calculation > 0.001) and linkup == " ":


2

I would change your cursor syntax to the following: with arcpy.da.UpdateCursor("node feature") as cursor: for row in cursor: - your existing code here -- cursor.updateRow(row) This syntax does a much better job of releasing the cursor when your'e done with it. Also. the data access module or "arcpy.da." is much faster. Is the problem ...



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