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1

Just create all four buffers, with different radius, for the entire shapefile. Then use a definition query for each 5 layers (1 pipeline + 4 pipeline buffer) with the objectid of the pipeline you are interested.


0

Have you tried using the newer pg_dump command line tools on your PostgreSQL 8.3 (you can run it from the 64-bit server and have it back up the 32-bit). It's been a while since I've done that, but that often works better than using the older tool.


0

This is a little difficult because of the branching nature of stream networks. Over 1km you will likely need your solution to be able to make a choice of which branch/tributary to trace up. I suggest calculating Horton stream order for your stream lines and then dissolving features based on the Horton order field. Once that is done you can create a point ...


0

This needs to be split into two parts: Only ArcGIS can edit map composition (.mxd) -- symbols, colours, labels, legend, embedded tables, etc., etc. -- and geoprocessing tools (.tbx). However the data can be edited by any program that understands the file formats inside the package, which can be any Esri supported filetype, most common are shapefile, ...


1

Another option would be to use the Minimum Bounding Geometry (Data Management) tool. Creates a feature class containing polygons which represent a specified minimum bounding geometry enclosing each input feature or each group of input features.


1

I'll suggest that you run the WaterShed Tool on the data. It will give a raster which indicates each watershed in that area, and then you can see whether each cell in your study area drains in the same creek or Sink.


0

ESRI has a basic GIS course is "Learning ArcGIS Desktop for ArcGIS 10) at this link: http://training.esri.com/gateway/index.cfm?fa=catalog.webCourseDetail&CourseID=1942 Knowgis.com is really good. I have their two-day professional training series and found it to be useful. www.KnowGIS.com


1

I know this has been solved already, but I was having the same issue and it turned out that my feature dataset was located in a personal geodatabase that had reached its size limit and that was causing the problem. ...just in case anyone else stumbles upon this and the above isn't the issue...


0

Would importing the symbology do the trick? Or do you need to take this through ArcPy? http://help.arcgis.com/en/arcgisdesktop/10.0/help/index.html#//00s50000002p000000


1

To add to @Neil's answer, you also need to increase the resolution of the DEM over which the image is being draped if you want to drape over a full resolution DEM. This is controlled under Propoerties -> Base Heights ->Floating on a custom surface -> Raster Resolution. By default ArcScene will assign very course resolution so that you can see the data ...


0

I cannot answer fully because I don't know all the intricacies of the personal Access MDB behaviour in a server environment. Perhaps this will help; the Style file is an mdb MS Access database so all the rules of the MS Access mdb apply, this includes locks, etc. Access is not a multi-user MDBMS so there will likely be issues with multiple users attempting ...


2

The raster quality is deliberately downgraded to increase display speed. See the Rendering tab of the raster layer properties in ArcScene and crank up the slider bar second bottom.


0

ESRI has a VBA script that shows how to convert annotations to polygons. Works well and I made it into an add-in for my own use. Once you have the polygons, you can easily copy and paste to a line feature class then export to DXF, DWG, Shapefile, etc. This will give you the OUTLINE of the text which works fine in 3rd party applications. If what you have in ...


0

The result value in each cell is the sum of the radiation (global) received by that cell (presumably 1mx1m) in the whole year. This will be expressed in kWh / m2, which is a unit of energy, not a rate. See here: Kilowatt-Hour - Wiki Those statistics are referring to the min, mean, and max of global radiation "amongst all the cells of the raster". ...


2

Here's a few ideas: ogr2ogr using the simplify option - pretty sure this preserves topology, but you'd have to experiment with settings http://mapshaper.org/ - online interactive simplification tool Simplify tool in ArcGIS (it sounds like you have that?) Simplify Geometries tool in QGIS I'm sure there are many more...


0

My ArcMap was crashing every time I tried to open any geoprocessing tool, or the toolbox itself. Was working fine for a week, until I auto-downloaded some updates last time I shut down the computer. Then all of a sudden I couldn't open the toolbox without crashing the program. After a very frustrating 4 hours, I fixed the problem. Not sure if this is the ...


0

I had the same issue, and the only solution that I found was to only select the specific snap one at a time, for example, only activate "end point snap" and deactivate the others, I hope this works.


0

The tool Copy Features honours the qualified field names environment setting. So Use that tool to make a copy of the dataset with the join and work with that.


1

Here is a script I wrote, based on the example Package Map (Data Management). It has a few changes you'd need to be aware of. It removes any rasters from the mxds and it sets the required Summary, Description & Tags to the name of the MXD. This will change your source files so be sure to back them up. It also just looks into a single directory and ...


2

Take a look at this page: http://help.arcgis.com/en/arcgisdesktop/10.0/help/index.html#//0017000000q5000000 I gave you the 10.0 link based on your tag. # Name: PackageMap.py # Description: Find all the map documents that reside in a specified folder and create map packages for each map document. # import system modules import os import arcpy from arcpy ...


1

You should integrate the rivers as an extraordinarily large cost value, several many orders of magnitude greater, that will force the algorithm to never include rivers in the calculations. Rasterize your rivers the same spatial resolution and registration (snap raster) as the cost surface - if you haven't already. Run a map algebra/raster calculator in a way ...


1

Basically, you need to use a spatial join to extract those values. The main issue is that you want more than one attribute value when it comes to an intersection. If your points are already located at the intersection, you'll need to use the "ONE_TO_MANY" option. After the join, you will end up with duplicate points: summarize the table with "first" and ...


0

apart from creating your own X Y columns as mentioned by @Emil Brundage, you can also use the built in tool called "Export Feature attributes to ascii". This is the answer for your title question, but what you need seems to be different. If you have a raster that you want to compare with your features, I suggest that you use "extract multivalue to point" ...


1

ArcMap has this functionality available in a few easy steps, as described here. In the attributes table, add your X and Y fields to your feature class. Right-click on each field and select Calculate Geometry. Select X Coordinate of Centroid or Y Coordinate of Centroid as appropriate.


0

Erdas Imagine has an add-on called DeltaCue that is designed for this type of analysis. Some of the highlights include: Multiple change detection algorithms: Magnitude, TC, Primary Color, Single Band, Band Slope. Automatic percent change thresholding. Change filtering based on spectral class, material type, area of change, and shape of change. Automatic ...


0

You cite ArcGIS and Erdas. Any of those software could help, but I would rather use Erdas than ArcGIS for remote sensing application (and if you want to use ArcGIS, you need the spatial analyst extension). For other softwares, your should consider QGIS, with GRASS or OTB (free and open source) as well as ENVI or Definiens.


0

I developed a software to do change detection using Landsat 8 Imagery: https://github.com/ibamacsr/indicar-tools It was tested only in GNU/Linux yet.


0

In my company we are using Definiens Developer http://developer.definiens.com/ for checking changes in time, ie Open Lands, woodland losses (illegal fellings, windblows, etc), new plantings… This software is also being used in oncology so don’t be surprised. Please check it out maybe you will find it any useful.


3

Instead of using a Timer (which runs on a separate thread) how about using the inbuilt events: IActiveViewEvents.ViewRefreshed (start refresh) and then IActiveViewEvents.AfterDraw (finished refresh). If you listen for the AfterDraw with the drawphase esriViewDrawPhase.esriViewForeground or esriViewDrawPhase.esriViewAll (you might need to experiment a bit to ...


2

If you are using System.Timers.Timer or System.Threading.Timer, your code that is triggered by the timer occurs on a worker thread. This thread will not be marked STAThread and so can't use the SaveFileDialog. You could either use System.Windows.Forms.Timer, which is synchronous and on the main UI thread, or use Control.Invoke to run your code on the main ...


0

I had the same problem, but for a different reason. Under 'Placement Properties' (a button on 'Labels' from 'Layer Properties'), on the 'Placement' tab there is a section to address 'Duplicate Labels'. The default on my system is to 'Place one label per feature part'. I changed that to 'Place one label per feature' and I no longer had the duplicate labels.


0

I really think you should have a look at ESRI's "ArcGIS Editor for OpenStreetMap". It includes a tool to build Network Datasets from OSM data: http://www.esri.com/software/arcgis/extensions/openstreetmap Shapefiles are kind of "deprecated" in the world of ArcGIS. I recommend using the tools included in the toolbox, and a File Geodatabase for storage of the ...


1

You should be able to do this by using the Project Raster (Data Management) tool to transform your DEM from a Geographic Coordinate System in decimal degrees to a Projected Coordinate System in meters.


2

To convert polygons to lines, use the Polygons to Lines Tool. To create random points along the line, use the Create Random Points Tool. To create new buffers, use the Buffer Tool.


1

I am not sure how much are you familial with R, but I think there is the best and very simple solution of your problem: library(raster) # read "raster" library setwd("D:/Data/....") # set you working directory r<-raster("your_raster.tif") # import your category raster file t<-freq(r) # ...


1

Although you are dealing with an image and not a polygon layer for your land use classifications, a Planning Department would normally have this layer in a polygon format for future planned land uses. My County has such a layer available for download. If you had a Polygon land use layer, you can set up the symbology labels of your layer to show area using ...


2

1. Tabulate areas The more robust method of calculating areas is to use the Tabulate Areas geoprocessing tool within Spatial Analyst. This is intended to calculate a breakdown of areas for classified raster data for a series of zones. For example, if you need the area of each land cover class for each city or town within your study area. To get the total ...


1

Whether the output goes into a shapefile (which has an FID), or into a geodatabase (which has an OID instead) depends on how you specify your Output Feature Class in the fishnet tool. This will create a shapefile: D:\Temp\test.shp And this will create a file geodatabase feature class: D:\Temp\MyFileGeodatabase.gdb\test


14

It means that the field is indexed. You can change the character used to indicate whether a field is indexed under the Table Options > Appearance menu:


8

The asterisk means that the field has an index. A Shapefile does not have any indexed fields by default, you need to add them. A GeoDatabase Featureclass always has a spatial index on the Shape field and attribute index on the ObjectID.


1

I think it is easier to use the textwrap module: Python label expression: def FindLabel ( [LEGAL1] ): import textwrap return '\r\n'.join(textwrap.wrap([LEGAL1], 20)) #charcter width set at 20 And the resulting labels have carriage returns split at whatever character width you chose.


0

Or you can go to the ArcMap Customize menu and then hit the Customize mode which brings you a Customize dialog box and then go to the Commands tab. When you go there, Scroll down to the Pan/Zoom on the Categories and then to the right there is a list of Zoom... Highlight the Continuous Zoom and Pan and drag and drop of any one of the tool box above the ...


0

To zoom to a feature, you can open up the layer's attribute table and double click on the box at the start of its row: This unfortunately selects the feature, so it's not the most robust method. For more specialized methods you'll have to start making use of python and custom buttons. To mark areas you've visited, I'd suggest a 'visited' feature class. ...


0

You could try creating a Fishnet and then pan/zoom to each square/rectangle in the fishnet by right-clicking on its table and selecting 'zoom to' or 'pan to' http://resources.arcgis.com/en/help/main/10.2/index.html#//00170000002q000000 The Fishnet will help you keep track of which areas you've been to and which areas you still need to check. To use the ...


0

I just tried the arrow keys In ArcMap and they appear to be panning without incident; but to clarify/confirm I am in Data View, with the Select Elements tool active, with the screen focus on the map. Most of the time, I hold the 'c' keyboard shortcut for mouse panning. Also, you can't go wrong with an honest bookmark when you need to mark and return to areas ...


3

Arc 10.0 can not create a Python Add-In. But, you can use VBA to create a UITool (you need to get VBA License), or you can create an Add-In with Visual Studio.


2

You are mixing a lot of terminology which is making your question rather confusing. You talk about "clipping" but then state "within the boundary" and finally you say you want all whole squares, that's 3 different things! I'm guessing you want all squares that are intersecting the polygon? So this would include all whole squares completely within the ...


1

To do this use Select Layer By Location to select the fishnet polygons that intersect the "vector polygon". You can then export the selected fishnet polygons to a new feature class.


0

I think the problem is with what you are setting the output data type as. Here is a model that achieves the same thing as you are doing without the need of a separate python script! The Calculate Value tool is a model only tool which can use python if you need it.


1

In your python script file you should replace output = where with : arcpy.SetParameter(1, where) Then in your script tool's properties edit the parameters so that your output where clause parameter has a 'Data Type' equal to SQL Expression and a 'Direction' equal to Output (see image). Save your .py file and the new script tool properties and remove and ...



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