New answers tagged

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You need to add another data frame to your layout. In that new data frame you copy all the layers you want to display in your inset. The easiest way to do this is to just drag and drop from your main data frame into the new one. This will copy them to the new data frame. Insert Data Frame Copy layers to new Data Frame Once you have your new data ...


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I'll try to expand PolyGeo's answer in order for you to understand more easily: The script lines arcpy.GetParameterAsText() show that these code lines are normally run similarly to a tool from the ArcGIS toolbox. The script requires an "interface" where you enter the required parameters. You could substitute these lines with a path to your data, as in: ...


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This script includes the following lines: allLayers = arcpy.GetParameterAsText(0) # Must be a multivalue in script tool params lyrList = allLayers.split(";") PNGPath = arcpy.GetParameterAsText(1) The arcpy.GetParameterAsText() functions are asking for two parameters from a tool dialog that you need to configure separately. They indicate that the script ...


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I'll go out on a limb here and link this page: ESRI FAQ Question Why does the data bit depth increase when a raster is projected, rotated, or >clipped? Answer Pixel depth is increased to provide the space to store 'nodata' values. This allows changes, such as a shift or a mask, to be applied to the raster. Pixels within the new raster's ...


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I found an answer on the following website on how to do this in R. The solution that is given above also works, but I am having memory problems to run it. http://article.gmane.org/gmane.comp.lang.r.geo/24010/match= ########################################################################## library(fields) library(chron) library(ncdf4) setwd("C:/Users/...


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If you're using ArcGIS 10.1 or above, you can use data access cursors. You can also remove your second outer loop by doing all the same stuff within the first loop. You don't need to reset the arcpy workspace to the same path twice. As I commented above, you pretty much never want to use try/except, until you have your script working properly. I've added ...


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Had the same question while looking at the label expression editor wondering where else they might have hidden, I mean placed, the option: Labels tab -> Symbol -> Edit Symbol -> General tab has alignment settings


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This is not an answer just a comment on @JamesLevrsha solution. I tested his script: inFC = r'd:\scratch\centres.shp' outFC = r'd:\scratch\centres_Copy.shp' searchField = 'CODE' desiredVal = 'PPA' searchCur = arcpy.SearchCursor(inFC, fields = searchField) inCur = arcpy.InsertCursor(outFC) for sRow in searchCur: rowVal = sRow.getValue(searchField) ...


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Apart from the already cited "insertCursor" and "Append" tools, a simple way to copy one or more features into an existing feature class is to make a copy-paste while in edit mode. Start an edit session for your target feature class Select the features that you want to copy CTRL+C CTRL+V save edit


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The Append tool: Appends multiple input datasets into an existing target dataset. Input datasets can be point, line, or polygon feature classes, tables, rasters, raster catalogs, annotation feature classes, or dimensions feature classes. For one ArcPy example its Help has: import arcpy arcpy.env.workspace = "C:/data/" arcpy.Append_management(["...


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Using an insert cursor would do the trick. If you are using greater than 10.0 then use the da cursors but this code is for 10.0. Code isn't tested. inFC = 'test.shp' outFC = 'existing.shp' inCur = arcpy.InsertCursor(outFC) searchField = 'BLAH' searchCur = arcpy.SearchCursor(inFC,fields = searchField) for sRow in searchCur: rowVal = sRow.getValue('...


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If you have two cross street descriptions in a table row and a unique Row ID that can be copied to other tables you can use Geocoding and Linear Referencing. First you have to geocode the intersection locations as points for the from intersection and the to intersection descriptions along with their common Row ID into separate point files. Then make your ...


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I'm going to go ahead and convert my comment to an answer. I'm assuming you've named your last field incorrectly. I think you may have meant it to be "B0R010" and not "B0R0010". Also, you may need to ensure that all fields are in the file. Also, check your indentation, as per @Jacob F's comment.


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In your code sample, you're trying to save the mxd object, not a path to the object. i.e., mxd.saveACopy(mxd). This is not the correct way to perform this action. The documentation advises using the entire file path, like the following: import arcpy mxd = arcpy.mapping.MapDocument(r"C:\Project\Project.mxd") for df in arcpy.mapping.ListDataFrames(mxd): ...


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The answer is defining the bigger buffers as disks (outside buffers around and outside the small inner ones that does not include the inside area of inner buffers), each bigger buffer will have specific inner ones and the overlaps of bigger buffers is not important. So, easily we must follow the process of buffer making from small ones to bigger ones.


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There is a ArcGIS Tool for converting Maps into Garmin Custom Maps: https://bitbucket.org/wankoelias/maptogarmincustommap/src Its quite similar to your script... i discoverd this after i finished making this Tool :O


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Solution that works if your small polygons do not overlap: arcpy.Union_analysis("small #;large #","C:/FELIX_DATA/SCRARCH/SCRATCH.gdb/UNION","ALL","#","GAPS") arcpy.SelectLayerByAttribute_management("UNION","NEW_SELECTION",""""Name" = "Name_1"""") arcpy.DeleteFeatures_management("UNION") arcpy.Dissolve_management("UNION","C:/FELIX_DATA/SCRARCH/SCRATCH.gdb/...


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It seems, that I found a solution. The key is to use "Path distance" tool, where first parameter, Input raster or feature source data, is raster of city and second parameter, Input cost raster, is roads raster, where each value has assigned time needed to pass one meter. Roads raster was created in following way: add field "time" to attribute table of ...


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By the da module, I assume you mean the Data Access module and are using the search/update/insert cursor functions. If that is the case, there is another workflow that you can use for arcGIS 10.0 without the da functionality using set.Value. ############ To create new data : The example below is for a table in an fgdb. import arcpy from arcpy import ...


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1) In Geoprocessing, use the Union tool to create a single feature class. This causes a "cookie-cutter" effect on overlapping polygons. 2) Start editing on the newly created feature class, exported from the Union. 3) Delete the desired polygons.


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Clarifies @TvsGIS' answer. In ArcMap 10.3 use COGO toolbar, select COGO Report (7th button from left) then select "COGO description of an existing feature" (2nd from right : arrow pointing to middle of a line). Then click on line feature. This gives the angle and length in Grid (Map) and Ground (survey measurements) co-ordinates. The transform from Grid to ...


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One approach that our amazing intern recently used, which turned out really well for us: Fill the DEM Calculate flow direction on the filled raster Accumulate the flow of the flow direction output Do a Con operation to set all cells with an accumulated flow over some threshold (that is meaningful for your geographic area and for your cell size) to be 1 and ...


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Possible solution: I created bookmark in layout view and exported it into shapefile. Computed coordinates of 5 points on the left edge using Excel and extent XMin. Labelled them:


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As mentioned in my comment above, there isn't a way to do this using dynamic text. However, you could write a script to do this and attach it to a python addin button or to run when you save the MXD or something. You'll need to create a text element to hold the credits and name it something like "CREDITS" as so: The basic code would look something like ...


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Try the Feature Manipulation Engine "FME" or Data Interop extension if you have .


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Depending on your ArcGIS for Desktop version and where you are storing your data, there is a tool called Alter Field (available at all license levels from 10.2.2; only Advanced at 10.2.1) that may be able to help you because it is designed to: Rename fields and field aliases, or alter field properties. However, be aware that if you only change the name,...


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The default rendered for the Landsat services has DRA (Dynamic Range Adjustment) turned on. When exporting/printing multiple requests are made and each has a different stretch applied (hence the stripes). Go to the layer properties and use a stretch that uses the dataset statistics or define custom statistics. If using an image service go to Layer dialog, '...


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You could just use the "filename" argument in the raster::predict function. To bring up help for raster predict specifically use ?raster::predict and you can see the additional arguments that are available. It can be confusing because predict is an R generic and you are effectively calling two predict functions, with two sets of arguments, one for your ...


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you can write your raster object to a file using writeRaster from the raster package. Most file formats will be supported by ArcGIS, personnally I use tif a lot. writeRaster(skylark.psi, file="skylark.tif") This will create a multiband raster. You can use bylayer=TRUE for multiple single band raster outputs . Your projection could be specified ...


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I think this will point you in the right direction (a few years late). You just need to switch the display units to anything else and apply/ok, then you can pick decimal degrees and it will stick. http://support.esri.com/technical-article/000011883


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Under ArcMap: Toolbox\Multidimension tools\Make netCDF Raster Layer: Raster layer will appear in TOC of map document In ArcMap-document TOC: Right click the Raster layer entry and convert to e.g. TIFF-file. I do not think that you can convert straight away to ESRI-GRID-format Toolbox\Conversion tools\ToRaster\Raster to other format (multiple): choose ESRI ...


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Instead of continuing in the comments, I will summarize here. I think your answer is twofold. For the first way of dealing with this, see @Maksim 's answer above. Symbol Level Drawing is the way to go if you want items to be ordered on the map in a certain way. If you are looking to process data in a certain order, you will need to use an ORDER BY clause in ...


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The help for ArcGIS is clear that you cannot do relates with Excel documents or any other document that does not support an ObjectID in the Fundamentals of ObjectID fields help. This help clearly states: "If your table lacks an ObjectID field, you won't be able to perform the following operations: Select the features in the layer on the map. Although you ...


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If you are wanting to re-project many rasters in a directory in batch you could create a model using the Iterate Files and funnel those found rasters into the project tool.


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http://www.arcgis.com/home/item.html?id=0dcb445291bf461bb573b1504c170e0c Works in 10.3 Load the add-in, then customize a tool bar (or create a new one) and add it. It's called Clip Data Frame


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Look into Symbol Level Drawing. From the accompanying screenshots, it looks to be the solution to your issue. Accessible via the Advanced button, within the Symbology section of Layer Properties.



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