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6

A solution to this is discussed on the ESRI forum here: Every planar surface has a simple formula, Jesse, in the form (something)*x + (something else)*y + (constant). In the Raster Calculator, x is $$XMap and y is $$YMap. The trick is figuring out the coefficients. Often you want to specify a plane in terms of its slope (s), aspect (a), ...


5

Your downloaded shapefile already had a coordinate system defined in its *.prj file: ...


4

You can use the Geometry object which is available even in 9.3. The .pdf file for Geoprocessor model in 9.3 The code sample: rows = gp.SearchCursor("D:/St_Johns/data.gdb/roads") row = rows.Next() while row: print row.Type Alternative way is to use Describe method where you could use ShapeType: import arcgisscripting gp = ...


4

I think that the error isn't with the data so much as with the symbology of the first tile. That is, it has to be in the way that the tile is being rendered with a colour ramp. The reason I say this is that I downloaded the data you linked to and displayed the tiles in a different software package and this is what I got: You'll notice that the 'Error' ...


3

It's likely the result of a topological error in the original vector file. If borders don't align perfectly, and remember that in most vector formats coordinates are stored to a very high level of precision, then errors will result in the dissolve output. This is the most common problem when running Dissolve operations. They can usually be fixed with a ...


3

EDIT Sept. 1, 2014: I have modified the code so that it would work with any field of any type where the typical blank values for each respective type are replaced. Testing for Null values is done first and separate from other tests, since a Null will cause any of the other conditional statements to throw an error. I left out a test for a blank currency ...


3

There are two things in that zip file: the "raw" raster data koppen_ics a layer file The layer file is just a pointer to the original data, with additional information about symbology (in this case, providing short text names for the various climate zones). Layer files are useful for saving a set of layers and symbology, but they can't be used if the ...


3

As far as I know, which may not be very far, you can't do that. An mxd is a separate document from the data it contains. Many CAD programs can use shapefiles, although again you wouldn't get symbology. For text, try converting it to annotation and maybe that will export to CAD. Do this on a copy of your data. I'm more used to bringing CAD into Arc than Arc ...


3

The short answer is you can't produce a clipped sid image in ArcGIS 10, the format is proprietary. But you should be able to produce a clipped jpeg 2000 (jp2) which is similar. A typical sid compression is 20 to 1. In ArcGIS to get the equivalent compression on a jp2 you would use 5 in the Environment - Raster Storage form compression quality box. (That ...


3

There is a tool in the free and open-source (GNU GPL licensed) GIS Whitebox Geospatial Analysis Tools that can identify the flowpath from any point or collection of points specified either as a ShapeFile or as a categorical raster. The tool is called Trace Downslope Flowpaths: The tool takes a D8 flow pointer (flow directions) grid as an input, which ...


3

In the requester's mxd, if you go to the Customize drop-down and then select Customize Mode (This is in 10.1. I can't remember if 9.3 was exactly the same, but either way look for Customize Mode somewhere), and then right-click on the button in the toolbar do you get the option to View Source? At 9.3 you could make buttons that fired VBA which in turn fired ...


2

For those who want to do this in 10.2, this modification of above worked for me: # Import system modules import sys import string import os import arcgisscripting # Create the Geoprocessor object gp = arcgisscripting.create(10.2) # Load required toolboxes... gp.AddToolbox("C:/Program Files (x86)/arcgis/Desktop10.2/ArcToolbox/Toolboxes/Data Management ...


2

As of ArcGIS 10.2.1 for Desktop, you can use Alter Fields (Data Management) with an Advanced level license to: to rename fields or rename field aliases for any geodatabase table or feature class The same tool became available to Basic and Standard level licenses at ArcGIS 10.2.2 for Desktop.


2

I know this is an old question but I like to look at the ArcToolbox History folder. It is a more complete picture of what you are doing - ie it will show you all the inputs and outputs for building a Service Definition file not just GP tools used. C:\Users\[USERNAME]\AppData\Roaming\ESRI\Desktop[VERSION#]\ArcToolbox\History


2

if you have ArcInfo, you could use "polygon to line" to have topological arcs. Based on the attribute table, you can select the lines which do not have values of -1 in the left or right. Then you select the polygons that intersect those lines and you invert the selection. Another solution is to use the dissolve tool (no multipart polygons). Then a spatial ...


2

The problem is not with the bus routes data, it's with your other shape files. They appear to be TIGER data, which is not distributed in a Projected coordinate system. At some point, the prj files for those three shapes has been corrupted, altered, or deleted. Perhaps you used the Define Projection tool on those shapes and set them to UTM 15N when you should ...


2

Walter: the HUD data uses ID's for the blockgroups (BLKGRP) with single quotes around them... the TIGER blockgroup ID's (GEOID) do not have single quotes: I would say that you should create a new column using Excel / Open Office to truncate the first and last values from the field into the new column...but I can't remember how to do that right now!!! ...


2

From my collection of ArcGis 9.3 python scripts: import arcgisscripting gp = arcgisscripting.create(9.3) Shape_A = "c:\\some\\path\\to\\shapefile.shp" Shape_B = "c:\\some\\other\\path\\other_shapefile.shp" Intersection = "c:\\output\\path\\output.shp" gp.Intersect_analysis(Shape_A + ";" + Shape_B,Intersection,"ALL","#","INPUT") You will need to change ...


2

In a similar case, I used a linear feature derived from the polygons on the top, and the polygons feature below. Then, you can symbolize your lines accordingly, whereas the polygons borders (the outline color in ArcMap) can be set to no color.


2

Python add-ins are new to 10.1. So your 9.3 user won't be able to use one. If he decides to migrate to 10.1 or higher (wouldn't be a bad thing after all, 9.3 is not supported for a while): Add-ins are stored in your user's profile (...\My Documents\ArcGIS\AddIns). I don't think you can use/find the add-in if you didn't install it on your machine. But if ...


2

In ArcScan, (even with v9.3) there are a whole load of tolerances to fiddle with, including a "gap closure tolerance". Have you fiddled with these? See ArcScan - batch vectorization In some cases you will have to resort to cleaning these gaps manually.


2

Have a look at generalization tools such as Expand, Shrink, Boundary Clean and Thin. A combination of these tools should help. For instance Expand followed by Thin in your case should join many of the gaps. What is achievable will depend on how poor your data are. An alternative which could help if you are finding too frequent merger of small areas is to ...


1

Seems like you have not initialized the list using New. Dim listofOIDS As New List(Of Integer)


1

You can do with arcgis project(Data Management) tool . It will convert from one coordinate system to any other. Go to arc tools and search for Project tool in Data management and give in put your vector file and give output coordinate system whatever you want based on your your requirements.


1

I noticed I could define the extent in the properties of the layer, export to layer file and then to .tif in ArcMap, so figured there would be a layer python command to make this in memory. Use "gp.MakeRasterLayer_managment" to make a temporary raster layer with the extent set to be the desired file extent. export the layer with gp.CopyRaster_management to ...


1

The single tool most suitable to your goal is Identity, which will cut up your A layer by your B layer and not leave any polygons based on the B layer that don't overlap A. However it requires an ArcInfo license. The next suggestion would be Union, which will return all polygons cut up by overlap. This will return not only the areas of common overlap ...


1

This can be done with the identity tool in one step, but identity needs an ArcInfo licence. Without this licence, you can use the union tool to create a new feature class. Then you delete the polygons where the old FID field corresponding with the polygon to split is equal to -1 (those are the polygons that only belong to the polygon that you use to split)


1

Can you do 2 operations, one a clip, the other an intersect and then append the 2 result sets together?


1

Using the Cut Polygons tool within an Edit Session allows you to split polygons by drawing a line, intersections in your case.


1

I ran into a similar issue. The only way I could really see (although not exactly security safe) is to disable only secure content through HTTPS sites. This MSDN Help tells how to change your security settings. Note I only got this to partially work last time I tried it. I was trying it through Google Chrome though. If this is for internal use, you ...



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