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6

The name for this kink in a geometry is an "inversion". It is not a topology error per se (as explained in this answer), but it can be an indication of coordinate collapse (such as at the mouth of a harbor, etc.). I can't think of any elegant way to identify inversions. One possible solution (that I haven't tried) would convert the polygon rings to ...


5

I think that book should be fine for learning ArcGIS. The software hasn't changed dramatically between 10.1 and 10.3. For most changes between 10.1 and 10.3 you can check out the "What's New?" sections in the online help. What's new in 10.2 What's new in 10.2.1 What's new in 10.2.2 The help for 10.3 can be found here. One major new change that came ...


4

Use the Calculate Value tool in model builder to drop the last 4 four characters of your Count_Field variable. Set the tool to be a precondition to the alter field tool to ensure it executes first. Set your expression as shown below


4

This should be pretty doable using Extent objects. If you are using python to run your Data Driven Pages, why don't you calculate the extent of the data frame every time you change pages. Then, while that's going, calculate the geometry of your point layer. Use the contains method of the Extent object to determine whether the point is within the data ...


3

You are missing a very little detail: the fact that in Python you can pull elements from a list starting at the back. The last element of a list corresponds to index -1. For example: location = "Cedar Wood Park" locationChoppped = location.split(" ") print locationChoppped[-1] would return: Park, and: location = "Highland Grove Hyper Megalopolis" ...


3

From TIGER: ftp://ftp2.census.gov/geo/tiger/TIGER2014/ZCTA5/ This is a shapefile of every ZIP code from the most recent update. You can spatial join your shapefile of points to the shapefile of ZIP polygons.


3

If you have ArcInfo, 3D or Spatial analyst, you can use the create random point tool to generate your points. First I would start with the intersection between your fishnet and a dissolve of your other feature class. This will give you one multipart polygon per grid cell including some of the yellow polygons. Then you can place one point for each of the ...


3

Provided you have the Spatial Analyst or 3D Analyst extension installed, you can use the Contour tool. This allows you to set an interval as you require. This will create contours over your whole raster. Then you can easily select those between 700 and 1000 using Select By Attributes.


3

Split Layers by Attributes check out this python toolbox. Split Layer by Attributes, county being the attribute you want


3

First, feature classes don't have symbology attributes. Symbology is attributed to layers in ArcGIS. When you add a feature class to a table of contents in ArcMap, a layer is created, though not saved anywhere as a .lyr file. If you are having your users add a feature class to ArcMap that they then symbolize as desired, below is the way of saving that ...


2

I encounter this problem all the time. The best work-around I have found is to add the basemaps as an image service via the catalog. The results are astonishingly fast compared to adding a basemap. Use the following URL: http://server.arcgisonline.com/ArcGIS/rest/services Additionally, make sure your data frame is using the default basemap ...


2

Census tracts assume/present a uniform population density. If you are using Mean/Median Center on each tract, you're essentially calculating the centroid or geographic center of the tract. That centroid may or may not actually fall within the shape, particularly in the case of non-rectangular bounded shapes, such as 'C' (like your example image) and 'L' ...


2

Provided you're comfortable with python, you can do this using the UniqueValuesSymbology class in the arcpy.mapping module. You can iterate through your fields and mxd's and change the value field. The two examples in the help file should get you going.


2

The ArcGIS network analyst extension needs a properly prepared network dataset (graph) for routing. Ordinary OpenStreetMap data sets are not routable because they are simple linestrings. Take a look at the OSM2NetwordDataset tool by Eva Peters. This tool creates a routable network dataset and takes turn restrictions (from OSM relations), oneway roads and ...


2

Your model fails because your input shape files have names that contain spaces. As feature class names cannot contain spaces, you need to use add the Calculate Value tool to your model to remove spaces from your inline variable "Name" and replace them with underscores. In the model below, the Name variable is precondition to the Calculate Value tool. ...


2

GetMap URL is automatically built using the response of GetCapabilities. Here you see, where do GetMap parameteres come from in the GetCapabilities Xml Document: CRS=CRS:84 => This is the coordinate system of all layers. Just try to search the xml file for CRS:84. bbox=-178.217598,18.924782,-66.969271,71.406235 => Search for EX_GeographicBoundingBox in ...


2

I use PyCharm for a period and and it works great for me.


2

You must use the Con tool with the following parameters (put the full path to the first, second and output rasters, not like I did here):


2

This is imo a great question. If you would be interested in just finding the intersection between two polygons, you'd use the Intersect GP tool and then adding the area of the resultant features back to the wetlands. But you are interested not in intersection yet essentially in the edge, or a segment which polygons share. There is a very nice GP tool in ...


2

Use an iterator in your model, specifically the Iterate Feature Selection iterator, then use Copy Features to output each feature to it's own feature class. Your model will look something like this: The element called Value temporarily stores the name of the current feature in the iterator. I've also added a variable for a Folder called OutputFolder ...


2

So, this is what I did to make it work. Turn off domain in all fields, which I did before. Then use "Domain to Table", which I did before. Then delete the domain completely, which I did not do, to nervous to do so previously. Then used "Table to Domain", which I previously did. I did not have to compress the database to get the change in the domain to work. ...


2

You should be able to set your default rendering options from ArcMap so that any images you load will be rendered in a specified way. To do this, go to "Customize", select "ArcMap Options", select the "Raster" tab, and then the "Raster Layer" secondary tab. In this menu you will find many options for rendering any newly loaded rasters. The section ...


2

Intersect, identity and union are the three main overlay functions that could be used in this instance. For the simplest case how many square metres (feet, inches, miles..) of LiDAR coverage are in each county?: Using Intersect overlay the LiDAR coverage over the counties shape file, calculate the areas to a field and then summarize with Summary ...


2

The script uses a somewhat crude method to guess which point within each polygon is furthest from any of the other points also in that polygon. For each polygon, it calculates the distance between all possible pairs of points, then finds the 5 longest distances and finds the point that was the most common in those 5 pairs. It writes these "far points" to a ...


2

You're mixing returning values from a function and assignment. You have to return the modified value, not assign it to the old variable. The correct format for the pre-logic script code would be: def mycalc(ADM2_NAME, Projects): if ADM2_NAME == "Bo": return (Projects + 1) else return Projects Although there is an even better (shorter) way of ...


2

I think your best bet will be to create a custom button that saves your map document - mxd.save() - as well as whatever operations you wish.


1

Right click your table in the "Table of Contents" click "Display XY Data." Choose whichever fields map to X, Y, and Z, then choose your coordinate system. Right click the event layer, and export to your desired location.


1

You should check, longName property of the layer to see whether it has backslashes or not: Here is the snippet: import arcpy mxd = arcpy.mapping.MapDocument("CURRENT") for lyr in arcpy.mapping.ListLayers(mxd): if lyr.isGroupLayer == True: if lyr.longName.find('\\') == -1: print lyr.longName I hope it helps


1

First, let it be known there are a number of ways someone could go about accomplishing roughly the same goal in this case. For me personally, especially for someone less experienced with arcpy, it would likely be simplest to do roughly the following workflow Convert the CSV file to Table in GDB Join the Table to Point Feature Class Make Feature Layer ...


1

Yes, you can use an older book with a newer version of the software depending on how wide a gap there is. In the case of 10.1 and 10.3, you should be fine. Depending on your level of comfort in working with software in general and navigating help files, and depending on the changes made between versions, you may find it annoying or frustrating. I took a ...



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