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9

The WGS_1984_Web_Mercator_Auxiliary_Sphere coordinate system is a PROJECTED coordinate system, its units are METERS. Your coordinates are read in meters so they fall near the origin of the coordinate system which is the meeting of the equator and the Greenwich meridian. If you want to map Lat/Long coordinates (degrees), use a GEOGRAPHIC coordinate system ...


7

You can accomplish this in batch mode, in ModelBuilder and with Python. Batch Mode: First delete your old XY fields using Delete Fields in batch mode. Right click on the tool and select "batch". Drag the files you want to process into the dialog box. The rows will automatically update to include all of the files you are processing. Choose the XY ...


7

You can color different polygons in one shapefile differently - you don't need to put them in separate shapefiles. You do it through the Layer Properties and the Symbology Tab. Once you are on the Symbology tab, you have a number of choices of how to symbolize your data. Which option is best depends on the type of data you are working with the ...


7

You can add your .dbf table into ArcMap and then create an XY event layer which you will be able to export to a shapefile. Read more details here: Adding x,y coordinate data as a layer


6

You need to finish the polygon's construction with double click, right-click>Finish Sketch or F2 before saving edits.


6

Do a spatial join! First, set up your data frame in a projected coordinate system of your choice (whatever units you want your distances to show up in). So, say you're working in State Plane Feet, make sure all your layers are in State Plane Feet, so if they're not project them into it. From there, Right click on the points layer and click Joins & ...


5

ArcGIS does not provide a piece of functionality that will let you do this directly out-of-the-box. In other words, there is no standard way for software to check what area a new feature is being created in and then populate a certain field in a feature class with a respective value obtained by performing a spatial join. Alternative that can get you closer: ...


5

You can do this directly in the field calculator.


4

I would use a Python expression like the following by checking Advanced on the Label Expression dialog of the Labels tab of the Properties dialog: def FindLabel ( [TestField] ): return [TestField].split("-")[1] This relies on there only being one occurrence of "-" in the field.


4

No you cannot have one layer using maplex and another layer using standard labeling within the same data frame. However, you could enable standard labeling in a separate dataframe within the same MXD. That way one dataframe would be maplex, and the other would be standard I don't see why you would want this though, so perhaps if you provide more ...


4

This function doesn't need to be too complex. Convert the items you want into a list, then join the result. def FindLabel([A1], [A2], [A3]): args = [A1, A2, A3] items = [str(x) for x in args if bool(x) and int(x) > 0] if any(items): return '-'.join(items) else: return ' ' If this were proper Python, you would normally ...


4

Creating a 3km radius circle is quite easy in ArcGIS: Create a point featureclass marking the center of your area of interest. Use the Buffer (Analysis) tool to create the 3km radius buffer around the point featureclass.


4

In order to use a scale bar with real measurements you must use a projected coordinate system, for example: WGS84 UTM (Zone XX north or south), Albers Equal Area (for large areas) or Lamberts Conformal Conic projection. Select View::Data Frame Properties or right click on the data frame icon in the table of contents and go to the properties. In the view ...


4

National Grid Transmission Network Shapefiles Available data: Over Head line Tower Substation Site Gas Site Gas Pipe Cable Shapefiles are in the OSGB36 (Ordnance Survey National) projection.


4

Try using a combination of the Multiple Ring Buffer tool and then the Polygon to Line tool, this should give you what you are looking for.


3

Connect a 'Make Feature Layer' tool in between the .SHP and the 'Select Layer by Attribute' tools. Creates a feature layer from an input feature class or layer file. The layer that is created by the tool is temporary and will not persist after the session ends unless the layer is saved to disk or the map document is saved. 'Select Layer by ...


3

Try: def FindLabel ( [name_field] ): a=[name_field] l=a.rfind("-")+1 a=a[l:] return a


3

There are missing semi-colons and problems with the parentheses. then you should make sure that you always have a string output. EDIT : sorry, I've given a solution for the field calculator. This solution is updted for the labelling engin. def FindLabel ( [A1], [A2], [A3] ): a1=[A1] a2=[A2] a3=[A3] if ( (int(a1) == 0) and (int(a2) == 0) ...


3

As @PolyGeo states un- and re-installing ArcGIS (and Python) is the solution, but you should do a COMPLETE uninstall of the software before reinstalling it. To do so follow these steps: Uninstall any third-party extension for ArcGIS (like ET Geowizard or Xtools) via Add/Remove Program Uninstall all ArcGIS/Esri programs via Add/Remove Program Uninstall all ...


3

Here is a piece of code based on @artwork21's proposed workflow. It uses arcpy.da cursors so you need to have at least a 10.1 license. I've assumed the fields have the following format: height: numeric area_id: numeric or text (see comments in code) highest: numeric (short) import arcpy points = r"D:\test.gdb\points" ## make a list of unique area_id ...


3

I would suggest using arcpy (Python programming) but since you are not comfortable with that, I'd suggest ModelBuilder. It has GUI and the learning curve is not very steep. You will be using several geoprocessing tools within ArcGIS and chain them within a visual canvas (a bit like MS Visio). The result of one tool's run will become an input for the next one ...


3

To do this I would recommend that you investigate Page Definition Queries which do not require the use of ArcPy. You will find a few previous questions that involve them on this site like Hiding selected features in ArcGIS for Desktop using ArcPy or ModelBuilder?


3

ArcGIS cannot work with TRMM data, however you can download the TRMM data in the NetCDF format which is supported by ArcGIS. From Esri Help: NetCDF (network Common Data Form) is a file format for storing multidimensional scientific data (variables) such as temperature, humidity, pressure, wind speed, and direction. Each of these variables can be ...


3

I would spatial join the area layer to the point layer. That should create a new point file with the area information joined to each point. I would go into the new attribute table, create a new 'Misplaced' Field and then field calculate "1" if "Points.Zones" <> "Area.Zones" Perhaps you can run a nearest neighbor analysis on the point file. That would ...


3

Since you only have points, one method you could try would be using the Minimum Bounding Geometry (Data Management) tool. I tried using the "Convex Hull" option and grouped by an attribute field option. If they are truly grouped in distinct areas (like for example, US States), you will see "spikes" that run across the screen for outliers. Another ...


3

Create a new integer field. Then calculate your existing field with the newly created one.


3

Assuming you are using ArcGIS, and not QGIS, this is a simple operation. It definitely can be performed in the Field Calculator. I created a field, "test_num", type of Double as an example. This is in ArcGIS 10.2 on Windows 7, 64bit. Source Table - Data set to 0 Field Calculator: Simply enter NULL as the value to be calculated. Result Table - ...


3

I would use a search cursor to find out if there are any rows in a table with empty string (i.e., ""). fc = r"C:\ArcGIS\Default.gdb\Parcels" with arcpy.da.SearchCursor(fc,"RouteName") as scur: for field in scur: if field[0] == "": #dissolve on one field else: #dissolve on another field


3

first you need a double == for your test, simple = is for assignment, not testing second you forgot the indentation and a semi-colon def MyCalc(Kultur,DG): if (Kultur == DG): return 1 else: return 2 third, DG must be identified as a string MyCalc(!Kultur!,'DG') it would go the same way with numeric values (you don't need quotes ...


2

This is very easily done by adding each of these data sources to a map and then Creating a map package: Map packages (.mpk) make it easy to share complete map documents with others. A map package contains a map document (.mxd) and the data referenced by the layers it contains, packaged into one convenient, portable file. The same functionality is ...



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