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5

This is definitely possible. I just did a test, and I was able to get it to work by using float() around the Acres variable. So, this worked fine for me: def FindLabel([PARCEL_NUM], [PROP_ADDRE], [Acres]): if float([Acres]) >= 10.0: return [PARCEL_NUM][-8:] + '\n' + [PROP_ADDRE] else: return [PARCEL_NUM][-8:]


5

You could take the resulting raster from your initial conversion and use Spatial Analyst --> Math --> Times to multiply the raster by -1.


4

To add a custom toolbox, in ArcMap or ArcCatalog, open ArcToolbox and right click in the white space and go to Add Toolbox: To see the script, right click on the tool, and go to Edit or Export Script. If you use Export Script, create a new text file and select it when exporting. You might need to go into the Geoprocessing menu, and go to Geoprocessing ...


4

To resolve the issue I did the following: Deleted extra installs/instances of Python outside of my ArcGIS10.3 folder. Reset my environment by following the steps in "Learn Python The Hard Way" by telling it to look in "Python27\ArcGIS10.3" Used "Repair Program" from the Setup application within the main folder for ArcGIS\Desktop Things seem to be ...


4

(1) I have usually heard of it referred to as a "Hexagonal Map" or "Hexagonal Grid Map". Both queries turn up a lot of relevant results in Google. Example Link Here: http://anitagraser.com/2012/03/04/mapping-density-with-hexagonal-grids/ The link above also outlines the process that you would use in QGIS. If you want to do it in ArcGIS. This article ...


3

Use the Get Count and Calculate Field tools. Make sure the output of Get Count is a precondition for Calculate Field. The output of Get Count is passed to Calculate Field via in-line variable substitution. E.g.


3

The output workspace and the FC name need to be properly concatenated. You can do this by using os.path.join(). # import system modules import arcpy, os from arcpy import env # Set environment settings arcpy.env.workspace= arcpy.GetParameterAsText(0) # type = workspace arcpy.env.overwriteOutput = True fcs = arcpy.ListFeatureClasses() # get buffer ...


3

I would do this the other way around from current comments/answer. I am assuming your scenario changes are where the flood values, not the buildings, change. Convert your buildings to raster with Polygon to Raster, using your flood raster as the extents and matching cell size/row column count/etc. There is some risk that a resulting cell won't be classed as ...


3

This is probably a bit of a roundabout way of performing this analysis, but I just did a quick test and it worked for me: Use the Raster to Polygon tool convert your raster, with the simplify polygons option unchecked. This should provide a polygon representation of the raster cells with the 'gridcode' attribute being the value of the raster cells. ...


3

The easiest way to do this is to use Python (can be run in Python window in ArcMap if you are not familiar with any IDE or Python prompt): import random print random.sample(range(800000), 240) This will give you a list of unique value (with no repeating), such as [1,2,5,12]. Now you can use the Select By Attributes in ArcMap and select the features which ...


3

Copy/Paste your shapefile to the Data Frame/Table of Contents so you have two copies of the same shapefile: Definition query one of the copies for Yes values, query the other for No values: Then symbolize each by ID field: The result should be something like this: Just a disclaimer, this method is purely for display purposes.


3

Here's the code and steps you will need to follow in Field Calculator: def get_node(node_text,node_number): parts = node_text.split(',') node_val = float(parts[node_number][parts[node_number].find('_')+1:]) return node_val Make sure that Python is selected as the Parser option Click on the Show Codeblock check box Paste the above code into the ...


3

Field Calculator can only update one field at a time, so you could perform slight variations of a calculation for each field. Or, if you're willing to try a little Python you could use arcpy.da.UpdateCursor to do it all at once. Could even just drop this into the Python window (modifying for your own table path and field names of course). import arcpy ...


2

It looks like you don't actually produce an output from your tool, only modify the input file. Although you have an argument for outFc you're not creating the output. Notice: all fields added and field calculations are performed on the input feature class. If you change your outFc to: outFc = arcpy.GetParameterAsText(2) the user can specify an output ...


2

Here’s my solution. I gave up with ArcGIS and QGIS, instead opting to output the data to file and perform the calculation in R. # Load library library(raster) # Load chlorophyll data chloro <- raster("../data/chloro.tif") # Load polygons poly <- shapefile("../data/poly.shp") # Extract data in polygons poly.chloro <- extract(chloro, poly) # ...


2

Shapefiles do not support topology directly, as you have discovered. The data must first be imported in to a geodatabase, and specifically a feature dataset within that geodatabase. If you need to continue on in shapefile form, you'll have to export it back out once you're done topology checking and editing. The answer to the actual/original question is ...


2

It seems the first dataset (vista_nicosia_links.shp) is using a different projection, most likely UTM (the zone depending on your data's location - for Nicosia, it is most likely UTM Zone 36 North). To match the coordinates properly, you have to correctly determine and define the shapefile's coordinate system (using Define Projection or changing the ...


2

There is an Esri technical article on this subject. This condition is often (unknowingly) created when someone opens a shapefile .dbf file in Excel and makes alterations. Essentially, the article recommends using a Shapefile Repair Tool. Keep in mind that this solution will alter the shapefile, so create a backup.


2

I am using vector and raster approach to solve it. The script below has 3 input parameters: a) polygons (must be single part), b)output point feature class to store the points most distant from polygon boundary c) tolerance in map units. Algorithm: POLYGON =shape geometry calculate centroid of POLYGON (p1) Define distance from centre to polygon outline ...


2

If i got you, you want to check if your circle can be inscribed inside the polygons.You can do it in ETGEOWIZARD,an arcmap addin, (see pics below) for those polygon and separate those maximum inscribed circles have area greater than or equal to that of your supplied circle-you can use select by attribute to separate those circles(>= your sample circle ...


2

Yes, it would happen with any data. Quantities is a numeric value and null means no data or no value, thus they won't be rendered (assuming there truly is no data/null for that feature and it's supposed to be that way). With Categories you can show null as a value, but not with a numeric based sybmology. Depending on which Quantities method you're using, ...


2

The shapefile distributed by GeoDa Center does not have a PRJ file, so normally you would have to define the projection in order to line it up with other spatial data. But it appears that while the shapefile distributed by GeoDa Center does in fact use the UTM 19N zone, for some reason the units are in kilometers, where UTM coordinates are usually expressed ...


2

The Correct form of your code is : def FindLabel ( [amenity], [osm_english_32_name], [osm_name_58_en] ): if not ([osm_name_58_en] is None): return [osm_name_58_en] elif not([osm_english_32_name] is None): return [osm_english_32_name] + '\n' + [amenity] else: return [amenity] The semicolon in the last line is removed. ...


1

The exact tool you are looking for is called "Erase". Unfortunately, it is only included in the Advanced/ArcInfo license level. You might be out of luck unless you can write your own version of this tool. ArcGIS Erase


1

I added a call to get the traceback object to your previous script (Batch merging field mapping). I added a shapefile with an "Acres" field that was one character wide, and got this traceback message: ERROR 001156: Failed on input OID 0, could not write value '340.417' to output field Acres My working version of your script, set up to run in Idle, is ...


1

Took me a few tries and some digging to realize but, as per the ArcGIS Help: Note: To label a subset of features based on a field value, create the SQL query in the label class instead of through the label expression. So try creating a label class for those features greater than or equal to 10 acres(SQL) then use the expression to format the label. ...


1

If you specifically want a single elevation (or specific elevations) as lines you can use Contour List (3d analyst, Spatial analyst). Unlike Contour (3d analyst, Spatial analyst) which creates contours at a specific interval the contour list tool produces contour isolines at specific elevation values.. for this example you would supply the value 0 for ...


1

I got it to run on a directory full of parcels, PLSS, and annexations. The directory had a mix of shapefiles and file geodatabases. I defined the datapath differently, but otherwise changed nothing. It failed on the 13th polygon feature class. The resulting shapefile had 62 fields and 44525 records. My failure was a type mismatch, so it was different than ...


1

You're using the selection tools incorrectly. Specifically, you're running two side by side and then adding a third when you just need two chained together. The output of your select by location should feed into your select by attributes. The current active selection is a single thing, so first you select within your buffer, then from that selection you ...


1

I've used i-Tree Vue to do this in the past, free to use just need the following NLCD datasets for your study area: 29 Land Cover classifications Percent Impervious Cover Percent Tree Canopy i-Tree Vue allows you to make use of the freely available National Land Cover Database (NLCD) satellite-based imagery to assess your community's ...



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