Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

4

You can access this through ILayerGeneralProperties "LayerDescription" property: Dim pLayerFile As ILayerFile Set pLayerFile = New LayerFile pLayerFile.Open ("C:\Tmp\Robert.lyr") Dim pLayer As ILayer Set pLayer = pLayerFile.Layer Dim pLayerGenProp As ILayerGeneralProperties Set pLayerGenProp = pLayer MsgBox pLayerGenProp.LayerDescription Code courtesy ...


4

The reason you cannot edit these layers is because it is not a file. It is a map service. What you are seeing is a web service. A web service is data that is hosted on a server elsewhere, that is not your computer. Your computer is going out and getting the data live from OLIVER when you look at it in ArcMap. In this case the data you want to edit is ...


4

First select "Open in ArcGIS Desktop": Once open on your desktop select the layer you want to export: Once you have exported the data open its properties and choose to import symbology from the layer you just exported: You should now have the layer symbolized as it was in the web map, if you already have the data saved locally you can skip step two and ...


4

In terms of pseudo-code I am using these steps: Define criteria for neighbours using spatial join 'one to many'. In this case it is the polygons that touch each other Connect neighbours by links Use network analysis package, e.g. networkx to build a graph, with weights for all links =1. Define a number of groups (N) and iterate through combination of ...


4

I certainly wish that more people would be as concerned about the display of digital elevation data as you are. I see so many examples of poorly rendered DEMs that it's somewhat disconcerting. So thank you for raising this question. First, to answer your question of "how can I be sure that I am using a correct setting", I don't think that there is such thing ...


4

You can't easily display label information in the legend, so the best solution is to have unique symbology for each of your points. The simplest way to do this is to open the properties for your layer and and select the Categories option on the left hand side (see below). You can then select the field to create a different symbology for each point. ...


4

Here is the code that should work for you: import arcpy mylist = ['A4126','A4190'] print str(tuple(mylist)) tempFeat_1 = r"C:\ArcGIS\Default.gdb\AR_postalcodes" tempFeat_2 = r"C:\ArcGIS\Default.gdb\AR_postalcodes_sel" qry = """POSTCODE IN {0}""".format(str(tuple(mylist))) arcpy.Select_analysis(tempFeat_1, tempFeat_2, qry) A couple of comments: ...


4

It has to do with the " representing inches, but interpreted as a quotation surrounding a string. The clue is in the records it imported. It did not import the records with ID numbers 252, 299, 301 and 306. Why, because these records are enclosed between quotation marks on the end of the line above them and at or toward the end of them. Line 249 is the ...


3

modulo is quite convenient for this. you can go to the properties of your layer, definition queries, and set MOD("FID"+4,8)=0 if you want to create a subset, you can also use this to select by attribute and export the layer in a new layer, but it is not necessary. As a remark, your display should go faster with a file geodatabase. Also, shapefile ...


3

Check out Creating Data Driven Pages, you can cycle through your polygons and have a map of each.


3

This is actually an exceedingly complex problem and not one that you're likely going to be able to solve using conventional ArcGIS tools. To do this, you'll need to develop for each depression in your landscape the relation between depth and volume, i.e. the depth vs volume curve, which will be uniquely defined for each depression based on it's form. To ...


3

Shapefiles, which use the older dBase specs, do not support null values. If you must maintain null values and you have to keep the file format to shapefile, you'll need to use a representative or 'nodata' value for it. This can be any value you wouldn't normally encounter or expect to encounter in the data, or that even falls within valid data's range, such ...


3

If your values are Normally distributed then approximately 68%, 95% & 99.7% of the values lie within 1, 2 & 3 Standard Deviations respectively, see here, so if you are stretching your values of the colour map using SD(2) all of the values that are below 2.5% will be black and all over 97.5% will be white, (depending on your colour scale of course) - ...


3

Perhaps you could use the "Unique Values, Many Fields" symbology option and choose the number field then the description field: Then when you insert the legend it will show the number and the description: Its not perfect because it doesn't show the number inside the symbol but it might do the trick and I bet if you convert the legent to graphic then do ...


3

You can use the Replace function detailed in this guide: Remove all spaces with the Replace function Sometimes, we want to remove all spaces between character and numbers in a range, we can use Replace function to solve it. Highlight the range that you want to remove all spaces. Click Home > Find & Select > Replaceā€¦, the Find and ...


3

To determine whether an arcpy SpatialReference object is projected or geographic use the property type: geoSR = arcpy.SpatialReference(4326) print geoSR.type Geographic projSR = arcpy.SpatialReference(28356) print projSR.type Projected


2

Here's how you can get Shape.area to display acres if it's in another unit. In ArcMap, go to the layer properties and the Fields tab. Under "Appearance", click "Number Format". Click the little button with the ellipses that is now displayed. Or right-click a field name in the table view, go to Properties, and click the little ellipses button next to ...


2

If Shapefile you can only delete (single delete) one feature set. Or use Iterate with Feature Datasets (Geodatabase) Delete Fields http://help.arcgis.com/en/arcgisdesktop/10.0/help/index.html#//00170000004n000000


2

Personally I would avoid the batch tool approach. Create a sub-model and cycle through the datasets using an iterator deleting the fields as necessary.


2

Your question title differs from you question body! You can save geoprocessing results with the mxd file.Older geoprocessing can be accessed from Arcmap Main Menu. (Geoprocessing > Results). In there You can see all the pre processed geoprocessings!


2

So you want to convert all values to the same constant value and NoData should remain NoData. Instead of Reclassify, use the Con tool with your input raster as 'Input conditional raster', and the constant value as 'Input true raster or constant value'. E.g.: import arcpy cst = 5 # your constant value outCon = Con(r"C:\data\intput.tif", ...


2

In GRASS GIS, you can use r.thin for this task: The code implements the thinning algorithm described in "Analysis of Thinning Algorithms Using Mathematical Morphology" by Ben-Kwei Jang and Ronlad T. Chin in Transactions on Pattern Analysis and Machine Intelligence, vol. 12, No. 6, June 1990, along with further subsequent improvements. In QGIS, you can ...


2

If you happen to have all the featureclasses you want to convert in a map document, you could just run the Consolidate Map tool on that MXD. Make sure to check the "convert data to file geodatabase option". Inside the output folder will be one or more fgdbs (depending on how many source pgdbs held the original features). If you don't have an MXD with all ...


2

This can be achieved in several steps. Run a Spatial Join for your buffer polygons and road network layers (right-click the buffer polygons layer in the TOC and choose Join and Relates > Join). You will get an output polygon feature class which contains information on how many road features were located (even partially) within the buffered polygons. ...


2

The data frame was using a geographic coordinate system which does not allow you to measure an area. I changed the data frame to a projected coordinate system which allowed me to activate the area measure tool.


2

Doesn't the third example script in the link you mentioned do exactly what you want in a single table? # Import system modules import arcpy # Set environment settings arcpy.env.workspace = r"C:/data/Habitat_Analysis.gdb" # Set local variables intable = "FIELD_NAME" outtable = "C:/output/output.gdb/TABLE_OUTPUT" # casefield = "Name" Not used stats = [] # ...


2

You cannot clip a vector file with a raster file. So you need to convert your raster to polygon first. In ArcGIS, you can use "raster to polygon" from the Conversion toolbox (no need for an extension). The problem is that you first need to create the mask, and there is no built in tool in ArcGIS without spatial analyst. So this step has to be done in ...


2

If you do have ArcGIS and no SA: you might consider converting to points, deleting the values below 12, making the rest of the values a single integer, convert to raster, and then converting to polygon.That polygon would be used in the clips and advanced drawing layer masks, I tested this on an SRTM, and it worked well: import arcpy from arcpy import env ...


2

I may be wrong but I don't think there will be an obvious automatic solution with the line features because you are trying to keep geometry that is both inside and outside your green flood area - and any tool will be unable to distinguish which parts to keep. One alternative to try is to convert your cross-sections and flood areas to polygons and clip the ...


2

Actually, if I open the recent History .xml file, C:\Users\USERNAME\AppData\Roaming\ESRI\Desktop10.1\ArcToolbox\History The most recent will have parameters & env. settings & time. It gives all the geoprocessing tools used (if w/in arcpy) and all the settings and environment settings and time started and finished.



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible