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3

Try using the .split Python function in the field calculator. If, for example, you have dog|cat, the .split("|") function splits the string by | into two parts ['dog', 'cat']. The [0] at the end of the function states that you want the first of the two items in the list. Finally, to be sure there are no remaining spaces in the rows, use .strip()


2

I don't think any GIS can globally compare to ArcGIS. But it all depends on the amount of money you are willing to spend, how/ for what purpose you will be using the GIS and the amount of data to be handled by the GIS.


0

Create 1 big rectangular polygon = extent of 1st ( no roads ) Union it with 1st layer, delete ones with FIDfirst!=-1 Explode result to single part polygon = BLANKS Calculate centroids of 2nd layer to create point shapefile with attributes of the parent, e.g. 'lake','road'. = PNTS Spatial join PNTS with BLANKS, keeping unique BLANKS id of blank ...


0

I think what you are looking for is the DROPLINE functionality which did not survive the ArcInfo Workstation to ArcGIS Desktop transition. There is currently an ArcGIS Idea to have that restored: It would be nice to have the option to drop the lines between polygons that have the same values for a specified field. This functionality used to be ...


1

This doesn't sound like an application for the raster datatype. I think what you really want is to use Create Fishnet (Data Management) to generate a vector which will overlay the other data. I would caution you about the use of such a tiny fishnet size. Unless your data is of submillimeter precision over a small area (as in an archeology dig), five ...


2

Ok, so I found the answer to my question. I could try to go on in length as to how to accomplish this task, but I would rather let ESRI do it. If you go to this link, http://help.arcgis.com/en/arcgisdesktop/10.0/help/index.html#//00s500000025000000 you will be given very specific instructions on how to do this from start to finish. It is actually a bit ...


1

It sounds like you want to read up on advanced symbology options using Join and Merge symbology options (different from Join and Merge editing, table visualization, and geoprocessing tools). Check out the article at http://resources.arcgis.com/en/help/main/10.2/index.html#/What_is_symbol_level_drawing/00s500000039000000/ I have personally never used this ...


6

Maksim already provided the answer with ArcGIS, so here is the (very similar) QGIS solution right click on your shapefile to open its attribute table click "toggle edit mode" button (a pencil) (or ctrl+E) on the right, click the icon for field calculator (an abacus) (or ctrl + I) write sqrt(name_of_field) Note that you can check "create in a new field" ...


4

Using Field Calculator, either VB Script Sqr([FIELDNAME]) or Python math.sqrt(!FIELDNAME!) under the Number Type will yield square roots. You can either calculate into a new field, or on the field itself.


1

PROJ.4 uses the position vector method for its 7 parameter transformations. The ArcGIS transformation that you're referring to uses the coordinate frame method. They use different conventions for the rotation values, so switch the signs on the rotation values and retry. General information: To change the direction of a 7-parameter transformation ...


2

I hate to be the bringer of bad news, but your current workflow is probably an inefficient way of reaching your goal. What you should check out is the Spatial Join Tool http://resources.arcgis.com/en/help/main/10.1/index.html#//00080000000q000000. It should do, I think, everything you are asking to accomplish if you set up the options right. You'll just ...


0

'Table to Table' tool will accomplish the task, as it 'Converts an input table to a dBASE or geodatabase table'.


1

If you already have some programming background then after you install Visual Studio (check ESRI documentation for the correct version of VS and .Net framework as latest version are NOT supported.) completing the Building Add-Ins with ArcGIS Decktop walk-trough is a good start. After you successfully complete this, you can start building simple add-ins by ...


1

when working at such a large scale, you should check that you are not exceeding the precision of storage of your vertices. You would not see any difference when you snap a vertex (where the stored coordinates are already "rounded"), but an edge can have positions which falls between two possible coordinates. If you are going to use this in another software ...


5

What you need to do to create a continuous surface representing precipitation is a process called interpolation. ArcMap has a number of tools to do this, based on a variety of statistical and sampling approaches. I'd recommend inverse distance weighting (IDW) as a starting point, because it's one of the simplest to use. The input for IDW is a single feature ...


1

You have almost the whole process. After selecting the features you want to have in a separate shapefile (so that they are colored like in the picture), right-click the layer in Table of contents (the list to the left), --> Data --> Export data. Choose where to save the file. To save the rest to a different shapefile, use the highlighted button (switch ...


1

Have you installed IE11? There is a bug registered as NIM097058 - The 'Simplification Tolerance' option disappears from the Simplify Line and Simplify Polygon geoprocessing tools after installing Internet Explorer (IE) 11. It's solved in 10.3. See bug description for workarounds in 10.2.


0

after you buffer and dissolve with a positive buffer value, as you say, you can buffer once again with a negative buffer value and you have your background polygon. EDIT : to avoid using a large buffer (that could remove some details that you want to keep), you can first union and dissolve with the "black" layer of the streets : only small holes will ...


3

Have you installed IE11? There is a bug registered as NIM097058 - The 'Simplification Tolerance' option disappears from the Simplify Line and Simplify Polygon geoprocessing tools after installing Internet Explorer (IE) 11. It's solved in 10.3. See bug description for workarounds in 10.2.


2

Problem solved. I was ignorant to the fact that they're cascading so I completely trusted those auto-generated .slds. The most general rule had to come first. Thanks everybody. By the way, if someone is interested how I extracted the SLDs - I did it with the trial version of Arc2Earth. It only allows you to do that layer by layer, but at least it's ...


0

The best documentation that I have found on how to pin, dock and stack windows in the ArcMap GUI came in the What's New section of the ArcGIS Desktop 10.0 help on a page called What's new in ArcMap 10 basics in a section called New dockable window controls make it easy to arrange and organize your display: With ArcGIS 10, you can arrange the windows in ...


4

It would be better to remove the layer using arcpy.mapping.RemoveLayer. The parameters are the data frame to remove the layer from (possibly a group layer if you are trying to remove from a group) and the layer itself, this alleviates any chance of confusion: def onClick(self): mxd = arcpy.mapping.MapDocument("CURRENT") df = ...


2

Well, the answer to that really is "It depends". Both options are very viable solutions for your problem and would likely fully be able to meet your needs. However, some things you should consider when making this decision: Model Builder uses the graphic user interface of the geoprocessing tools you are likely already used to using and the parameters in ...


1

The two ways which usually works quite well for me are Histogram graphs which you can create from View menu > Graphs. Tutorial on that. Statistics window which can be opened from the attribute table. Right-click the column name and choose Statistics. If you want to create a more professional histogram, you could use external libraries such as Python ...


0

My suggestion would be to use the Raster to Polygon (Conversion) tool on each of the two rasters, using non-simplified output. You could then use each of the resulting feature classes to erase the overlap from the original line features calculate the length of the remaining end portions.


1

his will take multiple steps: Get a cursor from you selection set public static IList<IFeature> GetSelectedFeatures(IFeatureLayer featureLayer) { if (featureLayer == null) return null; IFeatureSelection fSel = (IFeatureSelection)featureLayer; ISelectionSet selSet = (ISelectionSet)fSel.SelectionSet; ICursor cursor = null; ...


0

I've personally had little experience in using a Python AddIn as I would have approached this problem using ArcObjects and VB .Net. You specifically mention editing and not liking debugging in Python. You could create an extension that would listen out for the starting and stopping of an edition session. Once started it could log the tracking of your ...


1

I recommend you complete the Building Add-ins for ArcGIS Desktop walk-through then look at some of the code snippets that are availalbe to developoers. To address your question; You need to first isolate the geometry of the feature you want to use to do the selection, locate and set the destination feature class, create a spatial filter set the initial ...


4

The maximum accuracy you can get is that of the lowest cell resolution (or largest cell size), and splitting your cells won't increase the accuracy. That's why ArcGIS uses by default the largest cell size when combining rasters. Combining rasters using the lowest cell size is misleading, it lets you think your accuracy is higher than what it actually is. ...


2

Use the Copy Rows Tool to save the table view.


3

According to your edit, you want to create a map (layers, featured services etc) using ArcGis for Desktop, which in turn will be used via the Javascript API in my application This is simply not possible. When you publish a map as MapService, it takes on the projection of the Map. In ArcGIS for Desktop, there is no out of the box way to change the ...


0

geocat offers a commercial ArcMap plugin called 'Bridge' that can convert all of your ArcMap symbology to SLD (there is an open source alternative arcmap2sld). In QGIS you can import SLD and use this as style for QGIS layer. In bridge the tree structure of the TOC is exported as WMC, and the data as shapefiles (including metadata .shp.xml) and tiff's. I ...


0

A solution without ArcSDE that must be implemented within ArcGIS Desktop will need to provide custom python-scripted change detection, conflict resolution (if desired) and geodatabase synchronization. You can start out with a script such as this and expand it. This will detect your changes and export them as delta tables. You can try to reverse engineer ...


3

This tool is there in Route Editing Drag from this box to your interface toolbar.


2

Convert your .ascii to a raster by using the the ASCII To Raster GP tool. Merge multiple rasters with the raster calculator (Spatial Analyst).


0

Here is another set of steps that may create a .tif with your desired extent. I haven't tested this yet. The Raster Clip tool allows you define the clipping extent and have the clipped raster extent match the clipping extent (the extent of the other image). This is the 8th parameter, maintain_clipping_extent. From ArcGIS help, MAINTAIN_EXTENT —The output ...


4

The issue is in the interpretation: %Name% Expands out to the name of the feature class so the field calculation is looking for a field that matches the name of the feature class, is unable to find one, then returns an error as no field called MCD43B3.A2002001.h21v09.005.2007114212806.hdf.tif exists in the feature class. To use the name of the feature ...


3

Perhaps one of these two methods will work for you: ArcMAP Select by Location 3D relationships and ArcScene Select by 3D Box How about Inside 3D (3D Analyst)? Since the output of Extrude Between is a feature class with multipatch 3D features, can you use this tool to identify the 3D Point features which are within the resulting soil horizons?


1

I noticed I could define the extent in the properties of the layer, export to layer file and then to .tif in ArcMap, so figured there would be a layer python command to make this in memory. Use "gp.MakeRasterLayer_managment" to make a temporary raster layer with the extent set to be the desired file extent. export the layer with gp.CopyRaster_management to ...


0

if you look at the bottom right of your tool, there is an "environment" button. Click on it and you'll be able to define the properties of your output in more details (see here). (including "extent" same as one of your layers. This can also be set in the geoprecissing options from the main menu, for all tools at once. Note that you could use vrt files ...


6

If memory use is your prime concern, then lots of little (low vertex count) features is probably going to be more to your liking than a few very large (high vertex count) features. But you may find that "too many features" may eventually overwhelm even "too many vertices" for processing speed. If you think about how the algorithms must be structured to ...


0

This can be achieved in model builder. You would use a Feature Selection Iterator to iterate through the state codes and use that to select your points/polylines. The selection could then be used in a spatial join. Basically you need to read up on model builder and the iterators that can be used to loop with.


6

A Dissolve operation will usually reduce the number of features, arcs and nodes within a layer, particularly for layers with significant lengths of shared boundaries. Since the time spent during a Buffering operation is highly dependent on the number of nodes, pre-processing with Dissolve may significantly reduce the running time (and memory requirements). ...


1

From what I know this is not possible based on the built in OD cost matrix tool. The best way would be to loop on each physician, select their patients based on the common ID, then run the OD cost matrix.


0

To me, this seems very similar to simple pathfinding algorithm in computer gaming. In games, they have tiles, and oftentimes, they need to find a path between a tile of a certain type to a tile of the same type, without leaving that type of tile. A simple example of this is the A* algorithm. Might be a bit overkill for what you are trying to do, but here is ...


0

A beautifully made description of a sophisticated way to do this. Funny, to me it looks like vector (maybe your buffers are raster?), but I am still a newbie. What occurred to me that might be easier is to create a new layer and digitize the line with the mouse as you wish it, using the imagery of the layers pictured here. The buffers there make it ...


1

Represent each route as 5 (accidents, lanes..) parallel horizontal lines (unprojected) with length= actual road length. Space vertically these schematic lines just enough to place labels if any. Apply linear referencing tables to create colours (labels) to these straight lines. Tricky part. Find where your actual pages intersect route, you'll need a ...


2

I would recommend using either Kernel Density (Spatial Analyst) or Point Density (Spatial Analyst) to represent the magnitude per unit area in raster format. Once you have the KDE, Reclassify (Spatial Analyst) the raster into useful classes. Kernel Density Calculates a magnitude per unit area from point or polyline features using a kernel function to ...


6

Use arcpy.env.overwriteOutput. arcpy.env.overwriteOutput = True # Execute ZonalStatisticsAsTable outZSaT = ZonalStatisticsAsTable(inZoneData, zoneField, inValueRaster, outTable, "NODATA", "MEAN")


0

you could possibly run two closest facilities analyses. one to the detour the second to the destination.



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