Tag Info

New answers tagged

0

Does anyone have a suggestion on how to otherwise solve the problem ... The need to automatically generate all the columns from the table, the calculation of the sum, the results are updated in the new column? Recognizing the conditions: 1) did not know the names of columns 2) the name of the column to update the known example table: PS I am an absolute ...


3

edit: I didn't quite get what you were trying to do, but this should work as a sort of cumulative function. Untested (there may be some errors with indices): import arcpy, os, string fc = "D:\\path\\exampless.shp" fields = arcpy.ListFields(fc) fieldNameList = [] for field in fields: if field.type in ("Double", "Integer", "Single", "SmallInteger"): ...


0

Start a new, blank map or in your current map go to step 2. Double-click or right-click > properties on the dataframe (named Layers by default) in the Table of Contents (ToC). Go to the Coordinate System Tab, drill down through folder tree to Projected Coordinate Systems > UTM > Europe > European Datum 1950 UTM Zone 31N and highlight it, then click Ok. ...


-2

I came across the same issue a few weeks back, and after extensive web searches found mention that ArcMap 10.x has a bug (in the Windows version) that ignores the KML ExtendedData (which is the equiv of Attributes). Whereas the Linux version of ArcMap works fine. I've been hoping ArcMap 10.3 might have fixed this, but I'm guess its super low on ESRI's ...


0

When you add a layer to Arcmap, If this is the first layer, Arcmap will automatically set the coordinate system of data frame to that of the layer. When you add a second layer in a different coordinate system, Arcmap tries to project that layer (here WMS), to the projection system of the data frame (If there is a valid transformation between them). Now, ...


1

There are a couple ways to accomplish this task. The first is the Summary Statistics, as I explained in your other question. A second way to do this is to first perform your Intersect, and proceed this with a Dissolve, with the buffer unique ID field as your Dissolve field. This creates a new feature class with each feature representing all ...


0

You are making the classic mistake with the iterator and collects tool, this needs to be in a sub-model as shown below: Note Raster and output_value are preconditions. The code in the calculate value tool is different too as Lou suggested:


0

All the tools mentioned below (in capitals) are from Spatial Analyst-Hydrology toolbox. FILL digital elevation model. Output - 'filled' Calculate FLOW DIRECTION raster using 'filled'. Output - 'fdir' Calculate FLOW ACCUMULATION raster using 'fdir'. Output 'facc'. Apply classified symbology to 'facc' to see where your 'streams' are. The picture below shows ...


2

Yes. Convert the grasslands data to raster and, if necessary, query that to produce a binary indicator raster of grasslands presence (1 or logical 'true' where grasslands exist and 0 or logical 'false' where they do not). The focal (neighborhood) mean of this binary raster produces a "simple" density map. Use a circular neighborhood of the desired radius. ...


2

This can be accomplished with an Intersect, followed by a Field Calculate, and then finally a Summary Statistics. Make sure that your buffer feature class has a unique ID field. Before getting started, you will need to add a field (name Polygon_Areas, type Double) to your population polygon feature class, and then field calculate it, using Shape_Area as the ...


1

If I understand you correctly I think you are looking for the clip tool. in ArcGIS 10 and above it should be in geoprocessing → clip (or in toolbox Toolboxes\System Toolboxes\Analysis Tools.tbx\Extract\Clip) your input would be the parks and the clip feature would be the buffer. this will create a new feature class that is only the parts of the parks that ...


0

OK, I see you revised your question a bit. This script should get you most of the way there. The script will take a list of shapefiles and if there are more than 1 found in the list, it will buffer each shapefile and do a merge. If only one is found, it will only do the buffer. Just put in your own list of shapefiles in the main function. import arcpy ...


1

The merge tool does keep the metadata, but oddly enough only the metadata for the first input in the list of merge inputs. As mattytunks21 said, copying the XML file that is associated with the other layer files will save the metadata and then you can just copy and paste the xml contents from one into the other to have all your metadata.


0

To preserve the data you could export the xml files before you do the geoprocessing.


0

Here is a post to a more general question (Which character encoding is used by the DBF file in shapefiles? ), but maybe one of the answers is helpful for you: "ArcGIS and Geopublisher, AtlasStyler and Geoserver started to extend the standard to define the encoding. For ArcGIS, Geopublisher and AtlasStyler SLD Editor, just create a .cpg file (with the same ...


0

How about: Producing an RGB raster Exporting to vector Loop through each polygon's centroid and interrogate the rgb in the raster Put the RGB value in the polygons attribute table (maybe you could ninja / modify a bit of code from the link below) Symbolise a layer file for your range of RGB values, and apply that to your newly attributed vector polygons ...


0

I prefer to use Feature Class to Feature Class, as you can use it to go back b/n both formats.


0

If I got your question right, in ArcMap, within Catalog window browse the gdb and then right click to Export to SHPs.


-1

If you want make a wind map in ArcGIS, you can check this post. http://en.acolita.com/how-to-create-a-wind-map-in-arcgis.html


1

There has to be a problem with the CSV file. Possibilities include (but are not limited to): Spaces and/or non-alphanumeric characters in field names, or starting with underscore. Bad data in cells. Esri only reads the first few lines to decide the data type, if the first dozen or so are numbers it calls the field integer, if there's later a value like ...


2

I think your best bet will be to create a custom button that saves your map document - mxd.save() - as well as whatever operations you wish.


2

The answer may be dont, it's a special character. You can put an ampersand in your layer name that looks just great in ArcMap: Using a double ampersand &&: But when you create a map of it: The legend gets expanded to the 'true' text.


0

The Help page entitled Exporting a model to a Python script lists a number of caveats when using this technique as an aid to learn Python/ArcPy. I far prefer to run tools manually via their tool dialogs and then to use Geoprocessing | Results to access Copy As Python Snippet and then Paste that well-formed code into a Python script instead. In your case ...


0

Not an answer but a workaround.... Guess I'll just make my smaller polygons on a new map using just the 1 meter LiDAR DEM, then add them to the 10m and 1m DEM composite map. Wish I had 1 meter coverage for the whole project!


0

Create points at the ends of road SP-322. In double type field of the points set 0 for start point and road length for end point. Use points to calibrate roads into routes Create events along the road using your table, thus record in your table SP-322, 3555 (m) will become a point 3555 m from the start of road SP-322


2

You're mixing returning values from a function and assignment. You have to return the modified value, not assign it to the old variable. The correct format for the pre-logic script code would be: def mycalc(ADM2_NAME, Projects): if ADM2_NAME == "Bo": return (Projects + 1) else return Projects Although there is an even better (shorter) way of ...


-2

You are try to change the value of the input field (Projects) in line 3: return Projects += 1 change it to: return Projects+1 Furthermore change not all of your code paths return a value. change like this: else: return Projects


2

The script uses a somewhat crude method to guess which point within each polygon is furthest from any of the other points also in that polygon. For each polygon, it calculates the distance between all possible pairs of points, then finds the 5 longest distances and finds the point that was the most common in those 5 pairs. It writes these "far points" to a ...


-2

Since most answers are basically just a 'this is my favorite editor', I'll add this link to a poll on GeoNet. Out of 130 votes so far, the results are: PyScripter 51 votes PyCharm 17 Wing 10 PTVS 8 Komodo 5 NetBeans 1 PyStudio 1 Spyder 1 KDevelop 0 (Other 36) Here's the poll.


0

First use this script to print all of your layer DataSources : mxd = arcpy.mapping.MapDocument("CURRENT") for lyr in arcpy.mapping.ListLayers(mxd, "*"): print lyr.dataSource Then use this code: def FindLabel([OBJECTID]): mxd = arcpy.mapping.MapDocument("CURRENT") for lyr in arcpy.mapping.ListLayers(mxd, "*"): if not ...


2

I use PyCharm for a period and and it works great for me.


1

As both your add fields are adding fields to JoinedPermits you don't have to split it in the manner that you have. Simply link the output Formation Field Calculated as the input into Add Well Status Field. You can then connect your Featureclass to Featureclass to the Well status field calculated.


4

This should be pretty doable using Extent objects. If you are using python to run your Data Driven Pages, why don't you calculate the extent of the data frame every time you change pages. Then, while that's going, calculate the geometry of your point layer. Use the contains method of the Extent object to determine whether the point is within the data ...


2

Intersect, identity and union are the three main overlay functions that could be used in this instance. For the simplest case how many square metres (feet, inches, miles..) of LiDAR coverage are in each county?: Using Intersect overlay the LiDAR coverage over the counties shape file, calculate the areas to a field and then summarize with Summary ...


3

First, feature classes don't have symbology attributes. Symbology is attributed to layers in ArcGIS. When you add a feature class to a table of contents in ArcMap, a layer is created, though not saved anywhere as a .lyr file. If you are having your users add a feature class to ArcMap that they then symbolize as desired, below is the way of saving that ...


2

You should be able to set your default rendering options from ArcMap so that any images you load will be rendered in a specified way. To do this, go to "Customize", select "ArcMap Options", select the "Raster" tab, and then the "Raster Layer" secondary tab. In this menu you will find many options for rendering any newly loaded rasters. The section ...


0

What you need is a software that can resample with an average resampling method. If your input data is binary (0/1) then the output of the average resampling metho will be equivalent to the proportion of "ones". For instance, gdalwarp -tr 30 30 -r average input.tif output.tif From what I know, this is not directly possible with ArcGIS. You will need to ...


0

Before using the Moasic Dataset, I did not have the confidence to perform them until yesterday and gave a try. Now I have play it around and now I had to figure it out... Not sure the workflow is but here is what I did: Create mosaic dataset add rasters build footprints build seamlines Remove the dataset from ArcMap Run build overviews on the dataset ...


2

So, this is what I did to make it work. Turn off domain in all fields, which I did before. Then use "Domain to Table", which I did before. Then delete the domain completely, which I did not do, to nervous to do so previously. Then used "Table to Domain", which I previously did. I did not have to compress the database to get the change in the domain to work. ...


0

I may have misunderstood but: If you have an Enterprise GDB for an university, you probably have access to privileges of an ArcGIS Organizational account. Can you create 3 featureclass services that allows users to log into the ArcGIS Online and edit? Then you just have to reconcile the edits. I haven't ran into a situation that needed edits to 3 ...


1

Here's an idea, based on using Feature To Line. With ESRI, the tool is only available at the ArcInfo/Advanced license level, but with QGIS I'm sure you can find an version of it. So you could, as I often do, supplement your ArcView/Basic license workflow with free QGIS tools. Run Feature To Line to convert the lake features to lines (make sure you're ...


2

Use an iterator in your model, specifically the Iterate Feature Selection iterator, then use Copy Features to output each feature to it's own feature class. Your model will look something like this: The element called Value temporarily stores the name of the current feature in the iterator. I've also added a variable for a Folder called OutputFolder ...


2

This is imo a great question. If you would be interested in just finding the intersection between two polygons, you'd use the Intersect GP tool and then adding the area of the resultant features back to the wetlands. But you are interested not in intersection yet essentially in the edge, or a segment which polygons share. There is a very nice GP tool in ...


3

Split Layers by Attributes check out this python toolbox. Split Layer by Attributes, county being the attribute you want


0

By just changing the symbology you can inspect the results visually, nothing else. By doing that you simply set a flow accumulation threshold what you want to see. This of course depends on the case and there are no exact answers what is right amount of flow accumulation for channel initialization. This visualization trick is of course very useful to ...


1

Personally I've never found looking at the flow accumulation raster directly to be all that interesting. The purpose of messing with the cartography is to simply show you where the greatest flow accumulation is (the below example classifies it into two groups, one of which is transparent, the other is blue) from this you check if the major parts of your ...


2

You must use the Con tool with the following parameters (put the full path to the first, second and output rasters, not like I did here):


1

If you are using ArcGIS 9/10x the bog standard "Spatial Join" tool (ArcToolbox > Analysis Tools > Overlay> Spatial Join) will stamp your polygon category's on your quality points (as an out feature class). Where there is no intersecting category polygon the values will be null. After this you can use a statistics tool to get numeric statistics.


1

The first step is to dissolve the districts into a single polygon. If you have an advanced license you can use Polygon to Line to extract the boundary as a line. If you don't have advanced then you can create a line feature class, open it in ArcMap as well as the dissolved polygon, start editing on the line features then copy and paste the polygon into the ...



Top 50 recent answers are included