New answers tagged

1

It seems like a an resampling issue. I guess you used Nearest Neighbor, which is also the defualt setting. Nearest neighbor can lead to small pixel displacement of up to half a pixel. You can try to set the resampling method to bilinear and have a look if it fits your needs better. Bilinear interpolates pixel values by leaving the cells untouched in position ...


1

The download for the 64 bit geoprocessing installation is not freely available. I found it in my.esri.com under My Organizations -> Downloads -> ArcGIS for Desktop 10.4 -> ArcGIS for Desktop Background Geoprocessing (64-bit).


0

I think this answer published by @Zbynek completely response your question: How to reclassify only a part of a raster but keep the rest unchanged (ArcGIS or R) library (raster) # use state bounds from gadm website: # us = shapefile("USA_adm1.shp") us <- getData("GADM", country="USA", level=1) # extract states (need to uppercase everything) nestates ...


0

GDBT is still the best tool out there. Yes it is a registry hack to install in releases past 10.0 but it is one registry entry and does not affect existing installations. The GDBT installer is hard coded to look for version 10.0 and all the hack does is to direct the install to your ArcMap location. So add to this to your registry and you are good to go. ...


0

This is classical field calculator task. Take 1st point. Add it to empty list. Get next point and compare it to last point in list. Add to list if it meet condition. Convert list to polyline using return arcpy.Polyline(arcpy.Array(thelist)) Take expression from Update Z values on a line feature and modify it slightly


6

You don't need arcpy for this. In Arcmap open the Attribute table click on the context menu and select Add Field Type in the name of your new field and make sure the field type is set to "Short Integer" and add a Default Vaule of 0 and click OK. This will add the new field to your attribute table. Note that this Default Value will not ...


0

License queries need to go through to whoever issued your license. This would normally be Esri or one of their distributors. Contact details for Esri and their distributors can be found on the Esri Contact Us page.


0

It depends on what coordinate system you're using. If you are using a projected coordinate system (with units in meters or feet), you can use the field calculator (use the Python parser) with this expression: math.hypot(!SHAPE!.firstPoint.X-!SHAPE!.lastPoint.X, !SHAPE!.firstPoint.Y-!SHAPE!.lastPoint.Y) Or if you want distance on the earth's ...


1

You can use Feature Vertices to Points tool with the option to put the points at the Start and End of the line. Then use the Near tool or the Point Distance tool, this will then give you the linear distance between the end and start point. This can be added to a model to automate it. ...


0

Same thing happened to me, and the same solution worked. I am in ArcMap 10.3.1 and both running Select by Location in a model in Model Builder, and running a Select by Location manually would only select some of the features that fell within the parameters. Closing ArcMap and reopening did the trick! So buggy!!!


1

Two things to check: Add a crossdomain.xml file to the web server.ArcGIS API for Flex - Crossdomain usage documentation Use the unsecured version of the the map service since HTTPS is not turned on by default for most versions of ArcGIS for Server. (Substitute localhost with the server name if needed.)


-2

try this to use readkml2 in Tbn2cad, Available at autodesk exchange apps : https://apps.autodesk.com/ACD/pt/Detail/Index?id=525570879147558726&appLang=pt&os=Win32_64


4

I run into this alot with construction plans (black lines and polygons on white backgrounds). There are a couple things you can do to fix this. The first thing is when you export that image from GIMP, set it to grayscale and here's the key: remove the alpha layer. You can do this by Layer>Transparency>Remove Alpha Layer. The alpha layer can cause issues ...


0

The MXD file's layer seemed to have something wrong with it so I couldn't simply just publish it. Also doing that didn't allow me edit some information regarding the layers. I ended up finding a gdb file which allowed me to add the layers and edit them as I saw fit.


2

The link you post it brings me to a Catalogue Service where the metadata of a cartographic resource is located. This kind of Services are useful to share the information about geographic resources like who's the owner of the data, the extension, where you can download it or buy it, contact point and more other INSPIRE parameters. The XML download option of ...


0

Based on your comment that refines your goal, I would rather suggest to project all your polygons in a single, equal area, coordinate system (e.g. Lambert Azimuthal Equal Area considering that you work in Europe), then you can shift your polygons for the comparison. Note that this projection will affect the shape of your polygons, but it should remain ...


0

Due to projection issues this approach is not 100% exactly. See notes at the end. Initial Situation: Feature class A: UTM 29N, showing polygon in Dublin Feature class B: UTM 32N, showing polygon in Oslo I would try this to compare the polygons visually: Add Feature class A to data frame a. Coordinate system of data frame a is UTM 29N. Zoom to the ...


-2

You could try using 'Feature Class to Feature Class'. You can copy over a dataset and set the field map. I can't test this now for you but I hope it helps.


0

The answer is to do both. First, create a copy cat layer, making the point symbols in your legend larger. Bring your good map layer to the front so the second map (with the large icons) is hidden. Create the legend for the second map so in the legend the symbols are big. Convert that legend to a graphic. Remove the layer (bad map). The legend will still ...


3

The only thing that would change the size of the PNG by that magnitude, assuming your DPI has always been 220, and the vectors are generally similar, would be the page size being larger. 1-4MB is typical for an 8.5"x11" paper, but something larger like 14" x 22" could conceivably generate a PNG around 20MB. If the page size is the same, then I'd try out the ...


6

I added aerial imagery from GIS server and created fishnet over the area of interest: I use fishnet as index layer for my data driven pages, making sure the sorting order coincides with record order in fishnet table. I applied script (see below) to travel through pages, export them to temp raster, clip it to PNG raster named after page name. Result shows ...


2

Join the larger table to the smaller table via the common field, selecting Keep All Records. Sort the joined table to see which ones are in one but not the other, export those records. Then append the missing records to Table A


0

The issue (after removing all the ":" from column names) is the column named "natural", which apparently causes problems because it is a reserved word. I changed the column name to "nat" and now can view the data in ArcGIS without errors. The ArcGIS OSM extension recommended above seems to have a way around this (see ...


0

I actually found an answer, The "Point File Information" tool does exactly what I wanted: "Generates statistical information about one or more point files in a polygon or multipatch output." - From ESRI resources. If anyone runs into a similar situation, check out the tool mentioned above! ^


1

One way to do this would be to add an attribute to your polygon layer, say "VALUE", and assign it numeric value of 1000 or more. Then convert the polygon layer to a raster. In arcpy using the spatial analyst module these rasters can be multiplied easily. elevRast = arcpy.Raster("path/elevrast") polyRast = arcpy.Raster("path/polygonraster") resultRast = ...


1

If you edit the image in Photoshop you can use the magic eraser tool to remove the white background. Any white space will become transparent so make sure you use the paint bucket tool in photoshop to color any white space you want to show as white as a slightly off-white color that won't be noticeable. Save the Image as a BMP. Insert the image as a marker. ...


1

If those lines are vector lines (and not graphic lines as well) and you want to places those pictures onto them you can just add a point layer and put points where you need the symbol. Then you use your picture as a picture-marker-symbol where you can set the background or transparent-color to no-color. If you need special rotations you can put the angle ...


5

This is a known issue with ESRI. Their Page suggests these following workarounds (quoted from ESRI): Use one of the following two solutions to solve this issue. It is highly recommended to download and use ArcGIS Pro to perform all printing and exporting functions. ArcGIS Pro is not limited by the graphical device interface (GDI) ...


0

Adapt the GIS Tools for Hadoop samples of Point-in-Polygon join, to output the desired info, rather than output counts. Something to the effect of the following untested query: SELECT earthquakes.*, counties.* from earthquakes, counties WHERE ST_Contains(counties.boundaryshape, ST_Point(earthquakes.longitude, earthquakes.latitude)); [disclosure: ...


3

Create a field containing only the Year by slicing the existing field, and then symbolize using that field.


1

Field in the Feature to Raster tool must be exposed as a model variable. Right click on the Feature to Raster tool >> Make Variable >> From Parameter >> Field Once you have done that you can then set Raster_%Field%


0

I'm sure this was solved already one way or the other, but I was having the same problem. I imported an XY Event layer and was unable to select any of the points from that layer. The data was all there and the points located correctly, so it was a puzzler. My solution was to reproject the new XY layer into the coordinate system being used in the current ...


2

What you have is a hillshade surface built from a LiDAR point cloud. According to ESRI: A hillshade is a grayscale 3D representation of the surface, with the sun's relative position taken into account for shading the image. So each pixel of your .tif raster has an hypothetical illumination value given a reference position of the sun. What you want is ...


2

This can be done with a bit of trial-and-error in the Legend settings. In your Layer Properties Symbology tab, right-click on each symbol category and select Edit Description and enter the text you want on the second line eg (-102.12 - 17.92) and remove this text from the symbol label. Second create your Legend. Once it's created double-click on it to ...


1

I think you can make this raster dataset to export it into other formats like image formats (.tif,.png,.sid) and then, you can add all these images into mosaic dataset and run "manage tile cache" to use as like base map or backfill layer.


4

To make changes in the legend, first you will have to enable editing, right click the legend -> convert to graphics , then select the labels you want to edit and right click -> ungroup. Now you can manually move them around as much as you want and edit any individual parts, just move the lines with the text under the label. When you are satisfied with what ...


0

Whilst searching for an answer to this question I also found the VBScript solution to be a good option. I have a table that contains up to 20 links to pdfs with field names such as ReportLnk01, ReportLnk02 etc. I also have a single field (LnkPath) that contains a relative path to the documents for each record. The following script was used to open multiple ...


4

You'll want to use a cursor to figure out the rows that have values that have already occurred four times. Then you can create an SQL and a feature layer or table view with the SQL applied. Finally you can delete rows from the feature layer or table view. Sample code: #Table/shapefile table = r"C:\Users\e1b8\Desktop\E1B8\Workspace\Workspace.gdb\abc123" ...


1

A couple things might be happening here. You have a transparency on the layer (unlikely). You have a stretch type defined in the symbology for the raster. This might be standard deviation: Set it to None and see if that makes any difference.


1

This is Linear Referencing task, however Python makes it much easier. Solution below assumes your points and line are in projected coordinate system. Add your line to mxd, call layer "line". Add numeric field to your points table, use advanced mode in field calculator, python and this expression to polulate it: def Chainage(shp): mxd = ...


2

Not that I'm aware of in modelbuilder as a setting. The only way I can see calling that action would be calling a python script at the end of the model that makes the .net arcobject call to open said layer/table.


0

I am not sure if this is exactly what you are trying to accomplish, because your question is a little vague, but using TableView, this will allow you to add an attribute table to your map after it has been run. quoted from ESRI The full page with all the syntax, properties, etc... is available here ...


0

This did help me. Just run the toolbox (It's python script, but at least already have GUI, I don't have to build it my self).


1

Try using the "Create "Index Grid Features" You can specify the size of the grid, and this way your data becomes indexed and can provide a performance boost when you have a large dataset like yours. Make sure you check this box as well: Now, all this will do is create a grid, so you can cut the polygons and join them to each grid. Couple of links about ...


1

With ArcMap, there is no way I know of to bump up the resolution. For "transparency" of background, you could make the background a bright color, and then in Photoshop, replace the color with transparency and export to PNG. That could be a lot of work depending on how many photos you have. There might be a way to automate that process in Photoshop, depending ...


1

There appears to be an ArcMap 10.3.1 tool available on this page: http://www.umesc.usgs.gov/management/dss/split_by_attribute_tool.html This is the direct link to the tool: http://www.umesc.usgs.gov/management/dss/split_by_attribute/FoxSplitByAttributeAddin10_3_1.zip


0

The old-school version of the update cursor will do what you want pretty easily. I'm guessing you're working in ArcGIS? If so, here's what you do. Open ArcMap, add your city layer into your mxd, and create a field for the sort order, if it doesn't already exist. (And maybe start an edit session in case something goes wrong and you want to undo it.) You'll ...


1

Run the data through the SORT tool, sorting by your random number field, sorting in an ascending sequence, send the output into IN_MEMORY. For example input data is: The sort tool creates an FID field which is sequential, so all you need to so is select rows where FID <= 10 as shown below: If you need the lowest 20 then select FID <= 20. This ...


3

The tool does not carry over source point layer field/attributes. You will have to apply other tools/methods (e.g. spatial join) to bring over those attributes.


-1

I find the answer : Need to do MakeFeatureLayer_management dataFrame = arcpy.mapping.ListDataFrames(Mxd)[0] Layers=arcpy.mapping.ListLayers(Mxd, "", dataFrame)[0] for layer in dataFrame: Layers=arcpy.mapping.ListLayers(Mxd, "", dataFrame)[0] if Layers.name=="Signs": arcpy.MakeFeatureLayer_management(layer,"Signs_Shape_layer") ...



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