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Yes, you can run multiprocessing child processes from a toolbox script. Below is some code to demonstrate in a Python Toolbox (*.pyt). There are a number of "gotchas". Some (but not all) will be applicable to Python script tools in a binary toolbox (*.tbx), but I only use Python Toolboxes these days so have not tested. Some "gotchas"/tips: Make sure ...


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I assume you mean to reclassify the data into categories based on specific ranges, thus creating a discrete raster from a continuous raster. Do this... Since you already have the Spatial Analyst extension, go to Spatial Analyst in your toolbox. Click on Reclass, then Reclassify. Here you can add specific ranges and map them each to a new value, then export ...


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I wouldn't do this, especially not with some home-brewed license "server". If you're certain your IP is valuable enough to protect by licensing, you should purchase a commercial licensing solution. But I don't think this is necessarily the best solution as any form of DRM only inconveniences legitimate users and will not stop determined people reverse ...


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You have to remember (store in list) df.scale at each iteration. See if this will work import arcpy mxd = arcpy.mapping.MapDocument(r'd:\scratch\_wbench.mxd') df = arcpy.mapping.ListDataFrames(mxd)[0] listOfScales=[] goodScales=[50,100,200,500,1000,2000,5000,10000,500000] for i in range(1, mxd.dataDrivenPages.pageCount + 1): ...


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I've found this to be a dpi issue, not a font issue. Even using Arial font, the halos are shifted when exported at 300 dpi or less. I bumped the resolution up to 600 dpi using Franklin Gothic Medium Cond font, and the halos print perfectly. This is unfortunate since it greatly increases processing time and triples the file size (in my case), which is ...


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If you have Adobe Illustrator and the MAPublisher plugin, you can open the PDF in Illustrator and then export it as shapefiles for use in ArcMap


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You should just need to add your Excel worksheet as a table. Then as long as that table has a field that is also present in the feature class use ArcMap (or the Join Field tool) to join them.


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You could just create an additional data frame in which you edit you data - leaving the other one as is for layout and export.


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I do not believe that you can break the link between your Data View and its Data Frame on the layout. You could save a bookmark when you have the scale and location you want and use that to get it back. However, a better solution is probably to use Magnifier and/or Viewer windows.


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Your rasters, I guess from your description, are not overlapping. Therfore you should create a raster mosaic (using a gdalbuildvrt or the ArcGIS mosaicing tools) that would behave like a single image. Thenyou can use your tool (extract value to point or extract multivalue to point) only once.


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Extract multiple values to points from Spatial Analyst can deal with multiple raster data as input. But I dont know if it is working with 100 Datasets.


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The method to do this would be: Union county layer with jurisdiction (this will take care of those jurisdictions that overlap multiple counties) Convert those unioned jurisdiction features to a centroid layer, use the Feature to Point tool. Spatial join county layer with centroid layer Export table to xls or csv


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Since you're exporting to spreadsheet anyway, I'd convert the Jurisdiction dataset to centroids and then spatial join to the County polys. Each point would collect the county name that it fell within. Export the centroids to spreadsheet.


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One method would be to split your point file (via a select and export or some other method) into to new files - points within buffers and points that are not. From there you can use a Spatial Join (which doesn't require an Advanced License if you don't have one) to join the points outside the buffers to those inside. With the settings of that tool you can ...


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You could use the Python parser in the Field Calculator and construct this function. This part goes in the pre-logic. Make sure to replace the feature classes with the one from your system. The feature class table called "Temp_Table" is a temporary table and must reside in a geodatabase. It will be deleted as the script completes. def normNum(num): ...


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Using Python would open up some more elegant solutions, but you can do this entirely in ModelBuilder with the use of a couple of temporary tables. The model would look something like this: The Add Field operation adds a new column called [Normalized_Value] to your existing polygon table. A pair of Sort operations create two new tables, one with your ...


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Try layering the TOC something like this (disregarding the label layers) and then use Map to KML: Districts: empty fill, white lines 1pt Constituencies: empty file, black lines 2pt Full Area (run dissolve tool on one of the above layers): red fill, blue outline 3pt It's especially useful to have separate layers because you can toggle them in GE. If you ...


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You could do something like this... [Field2] = (( [Field1] - 0.24 ) / ( 2546 - 0.24 )) Basically you have to find the difference between the [Field1] value and the minimum value and then divide it by the entire range of data. normalized = (value - minimum) / (maximum - minimum)


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for transforming form Swiss-LV95 to WGS84 I currently use arcpy.PointGeometry(arcpy.Point(swissX,swissY),arcpy.SpatialReference(2056)).projectAs(arcpy.SpatialReference(4326)) with ArcGIS 10.1


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You could set up an .mxd that has all of the print symbology and scale bar, etc. You would never open this document, but you'd build a tool/script that would be run from the viewer mxd. That tool could look at that current viewer, take the extent and data sources and feed them into the template mxd (then save it!) and export that mxd to a pdf. Basically, ...


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You can use the gdaltindex command at the command line for this. Here is an example. gdaltindex output.shp folder/*.tif You could also use a QGIS plugin for this as inidicated in this post.


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Try using the Near (analysis) tool. The resulting table will show which point is closest by whatever OBJECTID you specify. Then perform a join and field calculate the values into your previous points.


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In the screen shot you have given I think this can be easily done with a spatial join. You just need to set the match option to HAVE_THEIR_CENTER_IN. Be mindful that if you have tortuous shapes with holes in then this may fail for those scenarios.


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Insert a new data frame, add your layers to that. Don't label any. Set the data frame extent of the new data frame to that of the first one (Data Frame Properties > Data Frame tab > Extent drop down > Other Data Frame). Adjust your layout as desired.


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When you add feature classes into ArcMap map document they become layers. You can define which fields will be visible for the layer in the Layer Properties window or directly in the Attribute table window. It is hard to guess, but they might have re-added feature classes and the settings they had for layers were updated. Esri help page: Setting whether ...


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I am sure all your classes are represented in your feature class. They will be further down in the attribute table. You have more than 200.000 features. As Michael said, when you convert a raster into a Polygon, pixels of the same class, which are not directly connected will be represented in a different class. Try to dissolve you new feature class (data ...


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Using field calculator (or, arcpy.management.CalculateField() if you want): In the code block: def fix_matrix(field_value): if field_value.endswith("A") or field_value.endswith("B"): return field_value[:-1]+"AB" else: return field_value In the expression: fix_matrix(!MATRIX!) + !PLANT! + !PCT! + !SITE!


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Create a Model Parameter. Here is a tutorial.


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You use gdal_translate to convert the format of file to IDRISI (RST). and the data type to byte or 16int. For example: gdal_translate -ot Byte -a_nodata -9999 -scale -0.200000 0.500000 1.000000 255.000000 -of RST input.img output.rst


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If you have the spatial analyst extension you can use the Euclidean Distance tool. 1. Convert the buffer to a raster with the "To Raster" tool (under conversion tools). 2. Then run the Euclidean Distance Tool which will create a raster with values representing distance from the cells that comprised the input raster. 3. Then if necessary, you can extract ...


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In ArcGIS, you can use tabulate area for this. It will give you a table as output with the number of pixels of each class within each polygon. Then you need to divide each column by a the total count and you have the percent. Note that ArcGIS selects a default raster size for internal analysis. So it is better to specify the pixel size in the environment of ...


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After talking to ESRI, 'Show layer at all scales' is the default setting. Currently, there is NO setting via publishing or in the ArcServer manager where you can change the default of a mapping service to be set to 'Don't shower layer zoomed in beyond', so that is set appropriately when you bring it into ArcMap.


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Thank you very much for your rapid reply. In fact, by deleting rows 1, 2, 4, 5 and 6, I want the row 3 to become the first row (headline) of the table (i.e., Au, Pt, pd, SiO2...). The latter contains 150 rows of data below the 6 first rows, that begins with #59101 in the provided example. Thus, I do not want to keep just the row 3, but realy deleting the ...


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I went to the same problem. After checking each layer's coordinate systems, I found out that the problem exists due to the difference in coordinate system. Just simply make sure the layer has the same coordinate with other layers, so the labels will be then displayed.


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just to sum up, each label is a single string that is independant from the others. Therefore the easiest way is to convert your legend to graphic, then you unsplit it and edit the text line by line. However, if you have a very large number of cases, you can create a new field for your legend, based on the concatenation of your input fields. Then you use this ...


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NASA provides some HEG tools for this you can also use gdal for this task (see this answer for the conversion, and below for he reprojection), or use the parameters of the projection to define your custom projection in ArcGIS (using copy and modify from the sphere-based sinusoidal projection to change the radius of the sphere). Note that projection will ...


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This characteristic of transparent symbols(resulting in more opaqueness from continuous overlapping) is a feature with Tableau software. increasing transparency will increase it all symbols and not individually to get this result. Another option would be to use cross hatching fill in ArcMap.


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I was able to find the same answer that @mkennedy wrote as a comment by using Google to search on "arcgis 10.2 vba". The first result was a page entitled Installing ArcGIS for Desktop VBA Compatibility: At ArcGIS 10.2.1 and 10.2.2, the VBA runtime is installed by the setup.exe of the ArcGIS VBA Compatibility setup program. Previous to ArcGIS 10, ...


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If I understand your question I think it is relatively easy to accomplish already: Use Table To Table with an Expression of OID = 0 and a field mapping to only pull through the fields you want into an empty table Use Join Field to join the empty table with the desired new fields (above) using the OID as the join field


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Let me first say I'm not a surveyor or an expert on the use of Parcel Fabrics. A basis of bearing is not a rotation factor for a parcel fabric. It applies individually to each plan/plat/whatever as a source going into the fabric. Old 10.0 help file on the specific tool describes some of it, and portions of that got incorporated into this newer 10.2 help ...


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I'm using 10.2. But you can do the same in 10.1 I just created a LAS dataset. It's under Data Management.


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As suggested by @Martin in a comment, the way to do this is by using Group Values. Here I have selected three values (using Ctrl key to multiple select) and am choosing to have them appear using a single symbol. I can now type whatever Label I want for that grouped value.


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I suggest few modification to your model and it should work, but in general you are on the right way. My data (hopefully as yours) include: Dealers point feature class and Sales point feature class. Each sale row has a dealer ID which relates the sale to its dealer. My modifications are: I used the Iterate by Row. Iterate by feature iterates through ...


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If you want to extract just row 3 and want to keep using ModelBuilder then you'll be wanting something like this: Create a model with your DBF as one of the inputs Use the Make Query Table tool or the Select Layer By Attributes tool with the query "\"COLUMN_A\" = 'Analyte Symbol'" (Substitute the real attribute name for COLUMN_A) Optional: Use Copy Rows to ...


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I would suggest creating a new field and then using 'select by attributes'. Do this for each of your three categories and populate your new field with some common value (ie. 1, 2, or 3). You could then base your symbology on this new field and properly show your three different symbols. Bit of a work around but that is how I would approach this problem.


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No it does not work to set patch size with point layers to adjust legend size; my option is to leave legend as is and add a graphic icon on top of ArcMap's Legend. Odd, I know.


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It looks like you need to do a Viewshed analysis. This can be accomplished using ArcGIS Viewshed (3D): ArcGIS Viewshed


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It turns out the problem was a lingering projection issue. The NDVI scenes were default projecting in Arc as a similar, but different projection (sorry, I can't remember what it was off the top of my head), whereas the assigned projection from USGS was Lambert Azimuth Equal Area. The projection along with a tutorial of how to correct the issues are posted at ...


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I'm not sure if there's anything wrong with the text of the query itself, but, to avoid ModelBuilder freaking out on you, you'll need to set catid as a prerequisite to the Make Query Layer step. If you set up a query or other operation in ModelBuilder that is dependent on a variable generated within the model itself, ModelBuilder will usually try to ...


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Parcel Fabrics add a lot of overhead to manage. I would say it is worth it IF: 1) you need to manage the legal descriptions of the properties 2) you need the accuracy to be survey grade (which it appears you don't) 3) you need to manage parcel changes over time (subdivisions, boundary line adjustments, etc.) From a county government perspective, it is ...



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