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9

The WGS_1984_Web_Mercator_Auxiliary_Sphere coordinate system is a PROJECTED coordinate system, its units are METERS. Your coordinates are read in meters so they fall near the origin of the coordinate system which is the meeting of the equator and the Greenwich meridian. If you want to map Lat/Long coordinates (degrees), use a GEOGRAPHIC coordinate system ...


4

Try using a combination of the Multiple Ring Buffer tool and then the Polygon to Line tool, this should give you what you are looking for.


3

I would use a search cursor to find out if there are any rows in a table with empty string (i.e., ""). fc = r"C:\ArcGIS\Default.gdb\Parcels" with arcpy.da.SearchCursor(fc,"RouteName") as scur: for field in scur: if field[0] == "": #dissolve on one field else: #dissolve on another field


3

You have three options here: Un-check the Add results of geoprocessing operations to display check box (Geoprocessing menu>Geoprocessing Options) By code, use the arcpy RemoveLayer() method. Also by code, use the arcpy Delete (Data Management) Geoprocessing function to remove the layer by name.


3

Here is a piece of code based on @artwork21's proposed workflow. It uses arcpy.da cursors so you need to have at least a 10.1 license. I've assumed the fields have the following format: height: numeric area_id: numeric or text (see comments in code) highest: numeric (short) import arcpy points = r"D:\test.gdb\points" ## make a list of unique area_id ...


3

First, let's clarify a couple of things. When you say that you want to add a table from MS SQL Server Management Studio 2012, what you really want to do is add a table from MS SQL Server. The management studio is simply the user interface for interacting with the database itself. Second, I am going on the assumption that this SQL Server database does not ...


3

I would suggest using arcpy (Python programming) but since you are not comfortable with that, I'd suggest ModelBuilder. It has GUI and the learning curve is not very steep. You will be using several geoprocessing tools within ArcGIS and chain them within a visual canvas (a bit like MS Visio). The result of one tool's run will become an input for the next one ...


2

If you want a new shapefile, containing just some of the existing parcels, but no others, simply query for, or select the ones you want, then right-click on the layer select Data, then Export Data. If you have an existing shapefile follow the advise of @Maksim


2

You should be able to do this through editor tracking: For file and personal geodatabases edited with ArcGIS for Desktop clients, and ArcSDE geodatabases you connect to through operating system authentication, the user name written is the operating system [in your case Windows] login. It sounds like you have previously been using this from the ...


2

ArcGIS makes frequent use of "registered rowid columns". These are INTEGER (32-bit) columns with non-zero positive values (1 - 2^31-1), which are defined to be NOT NULL, contain unique values, and are reproducible on subsequent queries ArcGIS uses these columns to maintain the relationship between rows in tables and the graphics in the map. Whenever ...


1

I would generate a list from the rt_long_nm field with a list comprehension and use that for the logic check. The list comprehension searches for all values except for None and adds those to a list. If the length of the list equals 0, perform some action, else perform another action. import arcpy OutShapesFCname = r'C:\path\to\fc' vals = [row[0] for row ...


1

For a tool, you should be inheriting from BaseTool. If you have developed the tool as a COM object, rather than an add-in, you can pass a reference from the form to the tool via a property or variable on the tool. In the tools OnMouseUp event you can then do what you want to the form through the reference.


1

My first idea was to override your tools OnMouseUp() method and fire an event that you listen for in your form but that might not work (never tried this) The safer way might be to use a windows hook. These are low-level mechanisms to intercept events. You can read more on the windows help page "Hooks Overview". I'd use WH_MOUSE_LL in your case.


1

To identify changes before they are committed to the SDE database it is best to use a check-out replica (see http://resources.arcgis.com/en/help/main/10.1/index.html#//003n000000v5000000). A replica database references a version in the SDE database (see http://resources.arcgis.com/en/help/main/10.1/index.html#/Replicas_and_geodatabases/003n000000vp000000/), ...


1

Are these polygons features (it appears they are)? Is there a unique field of type "Text" (something other than FID)? If so, you could also just use the Split_Analysis tool, and use the featureclass as both the input features and split features, the "Text" field as the split field, and then define your target workspace.


1

Your project (*.mxd) can be projected in any projection you want, but the coordinates of Google Earth are in Geographic (WGS84). So when you plot your points must define the correct projection. Then you can export it to shapefile and reproject to the project projection system.


1

this python code adds FILENAME field to all Featureclasses in a Dataset and populates with featureclass name. # Import standard library modules import arcpy, os, sys from arcpy import env # Allow for file overwrite arcpy.env.overwriteOutput = True # Set the workspace directory env.workspace = r"P:\geodatabase.gdb\filename" # Get the list of the ...


1

Either make a selection of the polygons you need, right click, copy, then paste into your new shapefile in the interactive window. Or, use append, to add the selected polygons to a shapefile of your choosing.



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