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19

You can use basemap layers to solve this. Once you are happy with the symbology of your layers you can right click the data frame and select New Basemap Layer (see below) which is similar to a group layer. You can then drop the layers into this group, it will redraw them once and then 'store' this view rather than redrawing every time you make a change. If ...


6

The following example shows how to integrate the built-in python method .upper() with the arcpy update cursor. This example first tests if a field is of type String then checks each row within that string for lowercase values. If there are lower case values, the row is updated with all upper case. import arcpy fc = r'C:\temp\test.gdb\yourFC' desc = ...


3

When you bring in a csv, Arc does its best to determine the appropriate field types and as you have found it doesn't always get it right. One solution is to use a schema.ini file (see bottom of page) to explicitly set the field types for your columns. There are several related (duplicate?) questions here on the GIS SE if you search for 'schema.ini'. More ...


2

Yes, absolutely, you can do that. The principle is to define a function-based index. The steps are like this: Assume I have a table like this: create table customers ( id number primary key, name varchar2(30), longitude number, latitude number ); 1) Define a function that transforms the long and lat columns into a geometry: create or replace ...


2

Under the File menu, see the Sign In option: Once you've signed in, you will be able to add data to ArcMap from ArcGIS Online - rather than hitting the + of the Add Data button, use the dropdown beside it: You will also see My Hosted Services in the ArcCatalog window:


2

When you digitize polylines if you want to make polygons from them is to make sure that they are crossing or activate the snapping environment (or directly draw polygons). If it is too late, you can still clean your polylines using the Extend tool but you need standard or advanced licence to use this tool. If you don't, you can try with integrate, which ...


2

Here's what I think you are asking: 1) Open the Attribute Table 2) Export the table to a new table 3) Save the type of table you want in a location you want 4) Edit the new table all you need 5) Join the new table to the old and 6) Calculate the new field values in the old table from those in the joined new table


1

Here's a quick example: fc = "whatever" fields = ("Name", "Addy", "Stuff") with arcpy.da.UpdateCursor(fc, fields) as cursor: for row in cursor: row[0] = row[0].upper() row[1] = row[1].upper() row[2] = row[2].upper() cursor.updateRow(row) And here's the ArcGIS manual for the da.UpdateCursor


1

You could save your functions in a raster function template and apply this template to other rasters using the Edit Raster Function tool (Standard or Advance license needed).


1

You can use Get Raster Properties (Data Management) to extract minimum elevation values. import arcpy inputRaster = r'C:\temp\dem.img' raster = arcpy.GetRasterProperties_management (inputRaster, "MINIMUM") To extract the information so that you can use it in a command such as Con or Reclassify use the following: elevMin = raster.getOutput(0) To put ...



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