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11

In the Help for Supported raster dataset file formats it says: ArcCatalog only recognizes the .jpg file extension by default. To add .jpeg or .jpe files to ArcMap without renaming them, add those file extensions to ArcCatalog or drag those files from Windows Explorer into your map.


7

Rather than try to use the ArcMap application alone, I have brought ArcPy into the picture. I just tested and achieved what you described using the UniqueValuesSymbology (arcpy.mapping) class which has a writable classDescriptions property which can be set to: A list of strings or numbers that represent the descriptions for each unique value that can ...


7

In Windows explorer copy and paste the following location in the address bar and replace username with your username on the machine with the arcGIS install on it.: C:\Users\username\AppData\Roaming\ESRI\Desktop10.1\ArcMap\Templates Delete normal.mxt (your mxd template) this will restore you mxd to it stock/original format with all your toolbars and windows ...


7

There are two ways to get at the Create Features window from the Editor toolbar: 1) Start Editing. Right-click on toolbar and select "Editor" 2) In the editor toolbar: Editor > Editing Windows > Create Features Alternatively, the right most button on the editor toolbar:


6

You can make ArcCatalog recognize .jpeg files by adding it as a File Type in ArcCatalog options. Inside ArcCatalog: From the main menu choose: Customize Select ArcCatalog Options Under the File Types tab choose New Type... Enter "jpeg" and "JPEG Image" .jpeg images will now display in ArcCatalog. UPDATE: For ArcMap, you have to separately add .jpeg as ...


5

Wikipedia defines sinuosity as: the ratio of the curvilinear length (along the curve) and the distance (straight line) between the end points of the curve So to calculate this in ArcGIS, you would need to determine: the curvilinear length of the line. You can use the Field Calculator the start and end points of the line. See this Stack Exchange ...


5

It has already been created. Try SplitLayerByAttributes


4

You should look into a Spatial Join. There are details here from ESRI. If you follow the steps of to spatial join the locations with the state polygons, you will get a new state polygon with a count field (Join_Count) that will tell you how many points were in that polygon. This is a great tool to get to know in GIS since it can be useful in many ...


3

By using "<FNT name = 'Arial'>" + ' ←' + "</FNT>" + ' Pathway to Moosehide Village ' it came out fine and kept the original font. Thanks for all the suggestions.


3

If you define sinuosity as a measure of the deviation of a line from the shortest path (dividing total length by shortest possible path), on http://www.arcgis.com/home/item.html?id=00e708a448b74810a0e805c4a97f9d46, you can get a python toolbox "Calculate sinuosity" to it. Just download it and load it in ArcToolBox to make the script available. Note that the ...


3

For sizing. It looks like some of the .bmp examples are set up as 16x16. If you look at your folder :\Program Files\ArcGIS\Desktop10.1\Styles\Pictures you can see the other examples of pictures that ESRI uses in ArcMap. You can style your photos similar to that size wise and quality wise. Now that you have an image.... In ArcMap, go into the Symbol ...


3

Joining a table to a shapefile won't change any data in your shapefile's attributes (thankfully!). Once you have the table joined to your shapefile, which you've done successfully, use the Field Calculator to copy the values from the joined table's fields to your shapefile's fields: Right-click the shapefile's field heading (we'll call it Field 1). Click ...


2

You should just remove the square brackets around fClasses in arcpy.Merge_management([fClasses], "Merged"). There are already brackets included in that fClasses list variable. For a reason that is not clear to me, adding these extra brackets selects only the last feature class in the fClasses list.


2

Sounds like a projection issue to me. Your data and analysis is being performed in decimal degrees - implying a geographic coordinate system. And yes, your map units are decimal degrees as evidenced by your screenshots. This is part of the problem. Generally in order to do calcuations related to area and length you want to be in a projected coordinate ...


2

Your method assigns CB as a list not the individual lines in the file. Try opening your file like this: f = open('M:/Elevation_Masks/elevs.txt','r') for line in f: cb = line.strip('\n') # Carry on with the loop


2

To do this: Turn off the layer in your map Save your layer as a layer file Add the layer file to your map - it will come in with the visible property set to False If you want to do all of this from code then setting the visible property on the new layer object to False before you add it to your map will make it just as easy to do.


2

the problem is solved , i described what I did exactly ,in first i change the type of the id from the serial to integer in the table , i tried to load it with defining the OID in querylayer's advanced option, but without defining the srid or the spatial reference ,the result was: the layer appear in the map & i can open my attribute table wothout any ...


2

When performing the attribute join in ArcMap, the joined information (that you can see in the attribute table) is stored within a map document (.mxd) file. In order to save joined fields in the new shapefile (so it will have fields for each year you need), you have to export the joined layer from the table of contents. The result shapefile exported on the ...


2

I am unclear about your function's logic, but I would approach it like this... Expression: autoIncrement(!Munic!, !Point!) Expression Type: PYTHON_9.3 Code Block: rec = 0 def autoIncrement(munic, point) pStart=1 pInterval=1 if(rec==0): rec=pStart else: rec=rec+pInterval return '{0}' "-" '{1}' "-" '{2:03}'.format(munic, point, rec) ...


2

-1.#IND returns when an incorrect mathematical operation is done, like dividing by zero or the square root of a negative number. Maybe GRASS tool used standard deviation of NoData set as -9999. I suggest two solutions: Check your source NoData value, if it is negative, change it to positive. If you cannot change it or if it's positive, you can convert ...


2

Open a new dataframe, don't add a basemap, just the shapefile, move your mouse around on the screen and look at the coordinates towards the middle are they small numbers that look like latitude and longitude? Open windows explorer and navigate to your shapefile... look for a *.prj file, if you don't have one, then you are working with data that no ...


2

Once you get the shapefile/projection problem solved: Kriging is a method of interpolating points to create a continuous surface. I think that you actually want to use graduated colors to modify the symbology of the points, manually setting classification breaks at the values you need.


2

See this question: Event raised when selected layer changes in TOC, but it will unfortunately not be good news for you, as no event of such kind is available in ArcObjects. The answers will provide some hack-ish workarounds which you may find useful.


2

I would use the following workflow to calculate the area within the classes: Reclassify (Spatial Analyst) the kernel density output to whichever classes you are using. By default ArcGIS creates a continuous raster surface for the kernel density output, but reclassifies the legend (which is temporary). Using the reclassify tool will make this permanent. ...


2

Here are a few options for clipping in ArcGIS: Clipping the DataFrame This allows you to draw a shape with the draw tools and "Clip to shape" which may be more what you're looking for. You should be able to draw a shape like a polygon and clip to it using this option. Using the Editor to clip. This is a quick and dirty way to clip your existing dataset, ...


2

You need to remove the trailing colon on the last line. return myText: should be return myText I don't see anything else that jumps out, but that's definitely the cause of the current error you're seeing.


1

Assuming that your kernel density plot is a raster created using the kernel density tool or similar, this is just a matter of using the Raster to Polygon tool. Make sure you specify the field that defines the classification of the raster and it will convert it to polygons. You can then use the Calculate Geometry tool to calculate area.


1

If you have a table with a row for each combination of year and point ID, then you have a many-to-one relationship ... multiple rows (years) for each point. This is always a pain in GIS because you have can't visualize multiple related rows very easily. If you have few enough years you have to deal with, you can work around the problem by creating a column ...


1

I recall having this problem before with ArcMap. In my case it was because I didn't go back in to the definition of query layer to refresh the columns. I don't have ArcMap in front of me so forget where that is. Try doing that or creating a completely new query layer if you haven't tried that already.


1

The problem in your current method, and the reason summarizing afterward as @Branco suggests would not work, is that your spatial join operation creates the first attribute you want (total points per poly) while it destroys/eliminates the second variable (owner) you want to summarize. In order to summarize, you need whatever variables you want in the same ...



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