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8

Instead of trying to zoom to layer you need to use the georeferencing toolbar to display your .jpg Once you have the .jpg in your table of contents, navigate to where your image will be georeferenced (assuming you have a basemap) you can then open the drop-down and select fit to display: This will center the image on your screen allowing you to start the ...


6

you can use the field calculator with the Python parser sum([!field1!, !field2!, !field3!, !field4!])/4 EDIT: for accounting for null values sum([a for a in [!field1!, !field2!, !field3!, !field4!] if a is not None )/4 not that, in this case, it works as if you assume that null values are ZERO as in your comment. Alternatively, you can IGNORE null ...


5

A shapefile (.shp) is a vector data storage format for storing the location, shape, and attributes of geographic features. A shapefile is stored in a set of related files and contains one feature class. A layer file (.lyr) is a file that stores the path to a source dataset and other layer properties, including symbology. In comparison to a shapefile, a ...


5

Maybe a few pictures would help. A subtype field can be set to categorize the main types (rock, soil, debris); This would correlate to Field_1. Notice the desc field domain is set to rock. Each subtype can set a domain for the desc field. The soil subtype has the soil subtype for the desc field. You will need to make domains for acceptable values for ...


3

You don't need to create an extra field to do this. I can see the arcgis-desktop tag in the question. So the workflow in arcgis desktop is of the following: 1- Make a selection (Dates Over 2013) and export to a separate shape file. 2- Revert the selection and export to a separate shape file. Snapshots in ArcGIS:


3

On the top menu bar of ArcMap in the Layout View, click the Insert menu, and then click Picture. The properties dialog for the picture element will give you a number of options, including a useful option called "Save Image as Part of Document" which stores the image as part of the map document: Best Luck with this.


3

There's probably several methods to achieve this but I will just mention a couple. The first requires several steps. I've created a couple of simple layers with a point layer (1 feature) and a polygon layer (3 features): Use the Polygons to lines tool, I just seach the Processing Toolbox and use all tools from there: Then use Convert lines to points ...


2

I'll assume you have your center points and their XY coordinates in a table. Step 3 requires an ArcGIS Advanced license. Create a point layer using your coordinates as the points. You can do this several ways, one is using the Add XY Data tool in ArcGIS. You just point the tool at your table of points. You'll need to specify which field is the X ...


2

The following (untested) code should do the trick. This first gets the geometry of the points and polygons into dictionaries, then uses the polygon dictionary with the contains method of the arcpy.Polygon to test if the correct point is inside it. If not it is added to a new dict and used to update the point geometry. import arcpy def ...


2

This help topic should get you started -- basically you embed your toolbox in a Python package and install it in your local Python installation. Then your tool should show up automatically under system toolboxes.


2

There is an option to exclude certain data in the layer itself. You could do this, and then it will graph everything else. Select layer-> Options->Symbology-> Charts-> Exclusion-> SQL query "Field" IS NULL This will make it so that all the null values do not appear in the bar graph. let me know if this solved it


1

One approach: You can clip a raster with a tool from your toolboxes, Data Managament -> Raster -> Raster Processing. There are various routes with for getting volume, but if you have raster data you can use this tool. You should also understand the error associated with your lidar derived raster and the estimates of volume and how that impacts your results. ...


1

Well, there very well may be a better method of doing this than comes readily to my mind, but, I do have some thoughts, so, here they are. First thing I would do is make sure you have some fields in your parcels with the X/Y centroid of the polygon, (making sure the point is actually within the polygon for odd-shaped/non-rectangular parcels). Optionally, ...


1

I would use below code- import arcpy,sys summed_total = 0 ## sum of A A = "FMeasu" ## your field to be multiplied B = "Tmeasure" ## fc = r"C:\Users\Winrock\Desktop\d\hi.shp" ##change your path to feature class curS=arcpy.SearchCursor(fc) for i in curS: summed_total = summed_total+i.getValue(A) del i,curS ##Add field which contains result of ...


1

I have found the solution: In the dropdown menu: Customize -> Add-In Manager... And then, highlight add-in and click 'Delete this Add-In'


1

Basically, you need to use a spatial join to extract those values. The main issue is that you want more than one attribute value when it comes to an intersection. If your points are already located at the intersection, you'll need to use the "ONE_TO_MANY" option. After the join, you will end up with duplicate points: summarize the table with "first" and ...


1

You should add the toolbox to the Normal.mxt - and copy this customized Normal.mxt to each user's install files location. See the last section of the Fundamentals of saving your customizations help page for more details. So if I understand correctly (never tried myself): When opening ArcMap, ArcGIS uses the Normal.mxt from the user profile (usually ...


1

ArcGIS for Desktop 10.2.2 is currently supported in multiple languages, which you can access from the My Esri portal. Since your language is not here, you can contact your local Esri distributor. From my experience, most of the countries have local Esri distributors localizing the software into the local language. Even if they don't work with the Esri on ...


1

If your language is on this list you can dopwnload you language package from ESRI. http://support.esri.com/en/downloads/patches-servicepacks/view/productid/18/metaid/1723


1

Tiff doesn't support 'transparent' like GIF. You need to set NoData value, open the raster properties dialog in ArcCatalog (right click on image): In the highlighted line click on the Edit.. button: And enter the value for the background. Then press OK and OK to dismiss both dialogs. Now GeoServer (and ArcMap and QGIS and GRASS...) should know that the ...


1

Depending on which version you have, you can add translation/rotation/scale information to a CAD layer via its layer property page in ArcMap. There's an option to enable an extra transformation. Another possibility is to incorporate the LDP scale factor (LDPSF) into the existing coordinate reference system. If it's Transverse Mercator-based, multiply the ...


1

It is impossible to change the font size of the text (such as layers name) in the Table of Contents in ArcGIS. You cannot do this manually or with ArcPy. It might be possible to do with ArcObjects, but it would involve heavy development effort. Your option is to use Windows settings: Go to Start > Control Panel > Personalization > Window Color and then ...


1

You should be able to do this by using the Project Raster (Data Management) tool to transform your DEM from a Geographic Coordinate System in decimal degrees to a Projected Coordinate System in meters.


1

Since Arc 10.2 doesn't like your font/encoding, QGIS may be able to help get this data into a shapefile format. It has a very similar process to what you are working with already in Arc. I have no idea if it will work better for you, or if it will have the exact same issues. See http://www.qgistutorials.com/en/docs/importing_spreadsheets_csv.html for a ...


1

I use arcpy.mapping all the time to do this kind of batch map export. To get the dynamic text working, you will need to create a text element in your map document. Then right click > Properties > Size and Position tab > Element name, and enter a name for your text element (see screenshot). Then, you just run the Python code, passing in that text element ...


1

Simply indent your second for loop, and it will iterate the twelve months for each iteration of your initial loop. for name in whale_names: arcpy.MakeFeatureLayer_management("Sichtungen95-14", "test-" + name, "SPECIES = '%s'" % (name)) # MakeFeatureLayer_management for each month for month in range (01,12): ...


1

As commented by @Baltok: One method that isn't fully dynamic, is to use a Viewer Window. You could open a viewer on one data frame and zoom around. Then just choose zoom map to viewer to get the other data frame at the same extent. This works alright if the viewer window data frame is only being used for a reference. It also works handy if you ...


1

Yes, you can delete it. It is the index file for the symbology, created when you search for a symbol. It would just be recreated at the next search. This issue (placing a large file in the roaming profile, which is often restricted in size) is known to ESRI but they have not shown any inclination to address it. See https://geonet.esri.com/thread/63346 ...


1

Select a subset of your FIDs, like 20,000 at a time, do the geoprocessing, and then merge the results back together. I believe the geoprocessing tools are getting wound in the spatial tiling algorithm.


1

To do this you can edit the field properties (right click the field in the attribute table) and set the NUMBER FORMAT to RATE (halfway down on the right hand side) and then edit the rate (basically a divide by) and suffix e.g. hec. There are further options for decimal places and justification if you want to further change the display. These options will ...



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