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6

Here's a handy list of keyboard shortcuts: http://www.esri.com/library/brochures/pdfs/arcgis-desktop-tips.pdf In an attribute table, Ctrl + Enter will move to the next row and select it. Then Ctrl + Shift + = (the equal key) will zoom to that feature in the map.


6

Here is the arcpy version of zoom to next feature. You may run this in your ArcMap python window: mxd = arcpy.mapping.MapDocument("CURRENT") # currently opened map doc df = arcpy.mapping.ListDataFrames(mxd, "Layers") [0] # define layer you want to iterate and zoom on for lyr in arcpy.mapping.ListLayers(mxd): if lyr.name == 'myTOCLayerNameHere': ...


5

A bit explanation why the OP's function is not working: f1 = a string list= a list When you are iterating over the list, for each member of list you will get either positive or negative response. So your list has nine members; you will get nine responses(+ and -). Then what the calc function will return, whole nine responses or one? Of-course python ...


5

First part is the AddIn, the real work is done on a form: Inherits ESRI.ArcGIS.Desktop.AddIns.Button Private pForm As fFeatureInspector Public Shared IsFormLoaded As Boolean = False Public Sub New() End Sub Protected Overrides Sub OnClick() 'My.ArcMap.Application.CurrentTool = Nothing If Not IsFormLoaded Then pForm = New fFeatureInspector ...


4

You need to create topologies and fix your shapefiles. Here is a guide to create a topology to a layer. In your topology you have to add new rule Must Not Have Dangles. List of rules. Next step is a validation. ArcGIS will locate all of your gaps, and you could fix them.


4

There isn't a 64-bit version although you can add in 64 bit background processing. ESRI released ArcGIS Pro, which is a 64 bit program. Have a look at the site for licensing and other details surrounding the program. It isn't a replacement for ArcMap, but you may find you're able to use a lot of the same functionality in it that you would with ArcMap. ...


4

I believe what you are searching for is called Integrate (ArcGIS Help 10.2 - Integrate (Data Management)): Integrate is used to maintain the integrity of shared feature boundaries by making features coincident if they fall within the specified x,y tolerance. Features that fall within the specified x,y tolerance are considered identical or coincident.


3

You can use a Python numpy array and a .sum() operation to sum all of the floating point values in the array. ArcGIS has an easy interface to convert raster data to a numpy array by using RasterToNumPyArray (arcpy) # Import the arcpy site package import arcpy, numpy # Your input floating point raster raster = r'C:\temp\floating_point_raster.tif' # Convert ...


3

Intersect will output polygons. However it will also only output the lowest order geometry input. Meaning if you give it points and lines, you get points. Lines and polygons, you get lines. One option is to use the select by location tool. You can select all polygons that intersect your points. Then either export to a new file, or invert the selection and ...


3

I would use model builder for this. Use the feature iterator to cycle through each polygon and feed that into the clip raster tool. You would use in-line variable substitution to pass the polygon ID or unique name you used in the iterator to the output name of your new clipped raster. Here is the model: If you don't know anything about model builder, ...


3

The problem is in the arcpy.mapping.UpdateLayer(df, updateLyr, sourceLayer, True) part. Your variable updateLyr is a python list. The documentation says that: ListLayers always returns a Python list object even if only one layer is returned. So, take the first index of the list, and you should be good as long as you have items in there. See the ...


3

You could just check if your field value is in the remove list: def remove_zero(field): remove_list = ['01ST', '02ND', '03RD', '04TH', '05TH', '06TH', '07TH', '08TH', '09TH'] if field in remove_list: field = field.replace('0','') return field else: return field Then you'll want to do: remove_zero(!FIELDNAME!)


3

In this case, the same thing could be accomplished with !FieldName!.lstrip("0").


3

Do you have the Data Reviewer extension? The Data Reviewer allows you to "Browse" through all features with the simple click of the "Next" button (zooms to both spatial location and attribute table record). There's a lot more functionality to Data Reviewer aside from this (such as flagging errors as "fixed", "marked" etc. and running batch jobs). Just an ...


3

You can force all labels to display by changing the placement properties. Go to layer properties > Labels Tab > Placement Properties > Conflict Detection and tick on Place overlapping labels It will look a mess when you zoom out but then you get all labels.


3

The EPSG: 3857, WGS 84 / Pseudo Mercator in QGIS is called WGS84 Web Mercator (Auxiliary Sphere) in ArcGIS. You are simply not using the right projection.


3

Below is some code in VBA that shows how to set the extent of the viewer window to the current map. The key interface is IMapInsetWindow which gives you access to the IMapInset2 and it's read/write properties. Public Sub updateMapView() ' Get map document Dim pMXDoc As IMxDocument Set pMXDoc = ThisDocument ' Get Map Dim pMap As IMap ...


3

You can do this using the Mean Center tool in the Spatial Statistics toolbox, it will compute the average X and Y coordinates for a set of points that you specify and generate an output point. You can specify groups of points in your source data for which individual centers will be computed using the Case Field in the tool, so you would use "Name" as your ...


2

As an alternative to ArcMap, I just installed ArcGIS Pro 1.1 which now supports extent indicators. In my first test of using leader lines I created the style below which I don't think could be done out-of-the-box using ArcMap. There are various other styles and options to experiment with there.


2

Yes, it's possible to fill a polygon with symbols on an angle. It cannot be done with Marker symbol type, only with Picture symbol type. Even with Picture it applies to the symbol as a whole, meaning you'd need to symbolize on your rotation field and set each one to the angle you want - the angle cannot be read automatically from a field (so far as I ...


2

I can think of two things off the top of my head. If you want to stick with an Add-In, you can use the onLinemethod and simply iterate through the line geometry the user creates and pass those points into an array and convert that to a polygon. The can add segments and finishes by double clicking. Or, another option is to make a script tool. With a ...


2

Your code won't work. You loop the cursor until it finishes. At that point pFeature is Nothing. After that you try to access the OID value of pFeature, which is Nothing. If you only select a single building or only want the first building OID of any selection set don't loop the cursor, just get rid of the cursor loop. Then you should make sure you got ...


2

Running SearchFix.zip fixed my issues


2

Even if you could stomach writing 565 AND statements, that wouldn't give you what you wanted. What you're actually seeking to do is known as a table join. You want to select the records of one of your tables that have a match in the other table. Once you have your tables loaded in ArcGIS (and you will probably need to load your CSV to something indexed by ...


2

The functionality that you are describing is known in ArcGIS for Desktop as extent indicators which can be used for overview, locator, inset and index maps. It is well documented in a page entitled Using extent indicators to enhance overview or locator maps: Extent indicators are a way to show the extent of one data frame within another data frame. ...


2

If you right click on the related table, you will find Sort Ascending option as shown below: This should do the job.


2

Having looked into this, you can do this through page definition queries. Add a field to each layer that specifies the page on which it should display. e.g. for Red_Circle open the attribute table and add field "Page". This field name must match the field name used in the index layer of your data driven pages. Edit this field to contain the page number, ...


2

An easier option than creating python addin would be to create a python script tool that uses various arcpy.GetParameterAsText(0) statements that relate to the Create Database Connection arguments, and then using conditional logic (if, else), is directed to open one of two map documents sourced to either test or production (already saved somewhere on your ...


2

I'm not 100% on this but I believe this is a way of transferring your connections. On your old computer navigate to Users > (user_name) > AppData > Roaming > ESRI > Desktop10.1 > ArcCatalog You should see a list of files with varying extensions: I think if you copy the files for the server connections you want to transfer to your new computer ...


2

The script below is using following naming convention of layers in the table of content: "Target" - feature layer with geometries to be replaced "chops" - feature layer with correct geometries It works on selection, i.e. 1 feature selected in each layer. import arcpy, traceback, os, sys try: def showPyMessage(): ...



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