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6

You may have some "unnecessary" files being created but ArcMap requires 3 files at a minimum for a shapefile to be usable. The absolute minimum is: SHP, SHX and DBF. The PRJ is also very helpful because it defines what coordinates system your shapefile is in. Some of the others are related to spatial features and are not strictly necessary, but ArcMap ...


4

that's nearly it, but the referencing of the field should be done on the field list, not the field name fieldList = arcpy.ListFields(r"C:\your.shp") for field in fieldList[19:]: print field.name


4

Could you do something like: Pre-Logic Script code: def mathFunction(y1, y2, x1, x2): return math.Atan(math.fabs(y2-y1) / math.fabs(x2-x1)) * (180/math.pi) Field = (on the bottom)...populate with your fields for y1,y2,x1,x2 mathFunction(!FIELDY1!, !FIELDY2!,!FIELDX1!,!FIELDX2!) See Python doc on the math module.


3

One of multiple solutions. Create points inside polygon, fishnet will do. Add vertices of polygons to this set. Create TIN. Export tin triangles and clip them: Updated answer on points creation. Script below works from ArcGIS and takes 3 parameters: Layer in TOC. Used to define extent. Distance between points, type double Points layer (empty) import ...


3

That's just the way shapefiles are. Each of those extra files contains data that is pertinent to how the shapefile is read by the GIS software. For example the .prj file stores the projection information for the shapefile, if you delete it the GIS software will see your shapefile as unprojected. Another is the .dbf file - this stores all the attribute ...


3

You should just need to add your Excel worksheet as a table. Then as long as that table has a field that is also present in the feature class use ArcMap (or the Join Field tool) to join them.


2

Both Chris W's comment and mr.adam's answer employed pairs of mxd's or multiple data frames to hold pairs of symbology. This got me to thinking about a similar approach. Multiple layer groups could be used to hold multiple symbologies (eg a "design" group and a "print" group). The user could enable the "design" group while doing design work. When the design ...


2

As mentioned by @nicholaschris, Zhu et al's paper is nice, and they have a tool associated with it. Note that the shift is a function of 1) the position of the sun (doesn't vary on one image), 2) the position (XYZ) of the cloud and 3) the elevation of the ground (2 and 3 do vary). So that a unique shift could not be enough. To answer the question with ...


2

This is potentially a very difficult problem when the borders are ragged. A brute-force search of the optimum could require computational time that is proportional to the square of the number of cells in the image (a value that often will be in the billions, trillions, or greater). One promising approach is to relax the conditions a little bit and actually ...


2

You could Use the Densify tool and set as parameter the distance you want between the point. Then you do a polygon to point processing


2

You can obtain the spatial reference of a feature class using the IGeoDataset Interface: ' Spatial reference of a feature class Dim geoDataset As IGeoDataset Set geoDataset = featureLayer.FeatureClass Set spatialReference = geoDataset.SpatialReference http://forums.esri.com/Thread.asp?c=159&f=1707&t=223709 OR '''<summary>Get the spatial ...


2

It depends which tool you're using, but in my experience (I haven't used every single ArcGIS tool), the output units are usually the same as the units used in whatever the source layer is for your calculation. So for your example, if your polygons are in a coordinate system that uses meters as the linear unit, the polygon volumes will be in cubic meters. The ...


2

Model builder, to my knowledge, does not expose the data driven pages functionality that you access on the toolbar. If you want to automate map output with data driven pages then you must use python and arcpy. Search help for DataDrivenPages (arcpy.mapping). From this page there is also a link to building map books.


2

You can do this in two steps. First, use Con (Spatial Analyst) to convert cells > 50 to 1 and all other cells to 0. Then use Zonal Statistics as Table (Spatial Analyst) to count the number of "1" cells within your polygon.


2

You can use the Feature Vertices to Points tool with BOTH_ENDs option checked, on your lines, that will give you start/end points of the lines. Then Add XY Coordinates to populate the resultant points with Lat / Long values. Another way to go about your workflow.


2

Did you take a look at any those lines to see what might be going on? Their start and end points may actually be in the same place, if they were drawn incorrectly. Select one of them and zoom to it. If it shows up as a point, that's why the XY coordinates of the start and end points are the same. Depending on the coordinate system you're using, it's also ...


2

You have coordinates in DMS (degree minute second) format, and need to get them into DD (decimal degree) to import easily into ArcMap. While in Excel, make a new column. This would be the formula to just convert from DMS to DD: degrees, plus minutes divided by 60, plus seconds divided by 3600. =MID([DMS], 2, 2)+(MID([DMS], 5, 2)/60)+(MID(A6, 8, 4)/3600) ...


2

This is a great example of how relatively simple arcpy.mapping scripts can offer more functionality than Data Driven Pages. First, if you haven't already, run a Spatial Join with your trees as your target layer and your districts as your point layer using the INTERSECT match option. It's better practice to perform a spatial join and apply a definition query ...


1

The following ESRI Knowledge Base artcile details the steps to turn your data from Excel into a shapefile. Hopefully you will find this is all you need. http://support.esri.com/en/knowledgebase/techarticles/detail/27589 Note: You will have to convert your coordinates to decimal degrees. Following @Erica's comment, and indeed a re-reading of your ...


1

Hornbydd is correct. There's an out of the box tool to do this called data driven pages. Data driven pages is based on the old school DS Map Book. It gives you the ability to make a map book series and strip maps. There's a handy cartography tool box with a tool for building a polygon index grid over data (like your lines), this in turn can be used in data ...


1

The only way that I know of to do this, requires spatial Analyst so perhaps I'll write it up as such and if it is possible another way, someone else will write that up as a separate answer. With the Spatial Analyst Extension, the tool to use is Zonal Statistics. I typically use Zonal Statistics As Table. I typically use a projected coordinate system ...


1

The problem with this statement is the parenthesis.. Compound statements need to be enclosed in a 'block': Con((Condition1) | (Condition2),True_value,False_value) The correct syntax for the field calculation is: Con(("%DEM_Aspect%" <= 90) | ("%DEM_Aspect%" >= 270),1,0)


1

I have done this in the past, though it is exactly the reason I began to store annotation as feature classes as @Chris W suggests. I strongly recommend that you try that out, because before you know it, you're going to have 3 data frames to deal with... and then the client will want to change the scale... However, I was able to get this to work just now ...


1

Here is a python solution (in field calculator). I give an example with a polygon layer. Each one holds a name value in its name Field, e.g.: "A" and "B". After creating representaion for this layer, I have got this image: Namely, I have created a 1-rule representation, using red stroke line with width 1. Than I would like to change "all" the strokes ...


1

You can do this by going into the catalog and checking the properties window of each feature class under XY Coordinate System. The quickest way would be to compare WKID numbers of each layer. You can also use the Describe function to identify the spatial reference and compare them. see this for more info on this.


1

The problem is partially going to be a function of scale. Depending on the scale of your map, any given texture might look incorrect because of the pattern/detail it's trying to represent. Easiest to see just by going to Google maps and turning on sat imagery and zooming in and out and noting how crops just become a blur. In your example, if you like the ...


1

Not only does a registered rowid column need to be INTEGER (32-bit), POSITIVE, NON-ZERO, NOT NULL and UNIQUE, it also needs to be reproducible on subsequent invocations. It is not possible to manufacture a field on the fly which meets this reproducibility requirement. Therefore the only way to generate a rowid for such a non-unique view is to populate a ...


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I have seen this with detailed vector data. Basically it leaks out. Polygons with duplicate vertices. Or even self intersecting. When I would use a fill or especially a hatch fill it would 'leak' out. Try running the repair geometry (i assume shape file data type) also as suggested the dissolve and or simplify would be worth looking at the results


1

The aesthetics might look better if you used colors that are more similar to one another, so you wouldn't get such an affront to your eyes. If you look inside national geographic, they often have basemap features in dark grays and blacks, with dividing lines in white, with a single color representing the variable they are showing. Usually a muted red. Using ...


1

You could set up an .mxd that has all of the print symbology and scale bar, etc. You would never open this document, but you'd build a tool/script that would be run from the viewer mxd. That tool could look at that current viewer, take the extent and data sources and feed them into the template mxd (then save it!) and export that mxd to a pdf. Basically, ...



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