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7

ArcMap respects the default font size of the operating system. You can change the font size in your control panel. You can also turn on magnification to make all "Classic" Windows apps larger and more readable.


6

You could calculate the field beforehand in Excel, or you can also do this in ArcMap. You need to add a field to your table (make sure you aren't in an edit session, thanks Sara). This will be for the % change. calculate the percent change in that field, using the Field Calculator. Possibly something like: ((table.INCOME_2005 - table.INCOME_1995)/ ...


6

Here's a go at it. Use Python as the parser and check show Codeblock. Enter this in the top Pre-Logic Script Code box: def getints(field): integers = [] for char in field: try: value = int(char) integers.append(str(value)) except ValueError: break return "".join(integers) And put ...


5

I think it may be as simple as changing this line: describe = arcpy.Describe(parameters[0].value) or maybe describe = arcpy.Describe(parameters[0].valueAsText)


5

I don't know what you've read, but if you convert your legend to a graphic you can only edit graphic properties. It's no longer a legend object. ESRI help on converting map elements to graphics (bottom of page). Edit: First, you have to do this in a new legend. You can't edit a graphic in the way you're thinking. Anyway, there are two methods. One, in the ...


5

Exp( 3.394 + ( 4.717 * "elev" ) + ( -2.602 * ("elev" ^ 2) ) ) In Raster Calculator syntax, the '^' operator is for 'Boolean XOr', not 'raise to power of' (see Raster Calculator operators here). Instead, you could use: Exp( 3.394 + ( 4.717 * "elev" ) + ( -2.602 * ("elev" ** 2) ) ) or Exp( 3.394 + ( 4.717 * "elev" ) + ( -2.602 * ("elev" * "elev") ) ) ...


4

There is a tool called Find Identical (Data Management) that does exactly what you are after. The tool adds a new field to the output feature class indicating the status.


4

Yes, if you just want to do it with selections you need to run multiple selections and change the method/initial set. First Select by Location using within your smallest boundary. Or if you've got two that overlap somewhat, you select everything within one then run another selection using the method 'select from currently selected features in', as discussed ...


3

Use the Delete Identical tool. In the syntax you specify the field you want to look for duplicates in and ArcMap deletes all but one of them automatically. You can also use the Find Identical tool to just find the identical features and delete them manually if you would like to check the results yourself.


3

You can georeference a JPG image if you can identify parts of the image in another basemap or geo-referenced dataset of any kind. Get the georeferencing toolbar from the Customize Menu. When you bring the image in (add it like you would any other data) it won't match anything spatially so you will need to match areas in the JPEG with areas in your basemap ...


3

You will want to create a ToolControl button that allows you to click on a map as opposed to a button which does something when you click on it. Then grab the point, create a spatialfilter and query your polygon layer, this returns a Feature object which you can return the various address components and populate some form that you created. The bold words ...


3

In his comment, @ian is correct about AddWarning() being useless outside of a tool's execute() method. I think the method you do want is setWarningMessage(). Try this: describe = arcpy.Describe(parameters[0].value) if describe.shapeType in ('Point', 'Multipoint'): # catch point & multipoint parameters[0].setWarningMessage('This is a point feature ...


3

No. ArcObjects will not be the development model for ArcGIS Pro. Your two development options in ArcGIS Pro are either via a new set of .Net APIs or via Python.


3

It sounds you are after automatic raster to vector conversion and the extension to ArcGIS for Desktop that does that (as mentioned in a comment by @radouxju) is ArcScan: ArcScan provides tools that allow you to convert scanned images into vector-based feature layers. The process of converting raster data to vector features is known as vectorization. ...


3

Here is a field calculator method that incorporates itertools.takewhile. While ian's solution writes the new values to a text field, this is suited for writing to a numeric field. import itertools def convert(x): try: return int("".join(itertools.takewhile(str.isdigit, str(x)))) except: pass convert(!OriginalString!)


3

You mention Python scripting, which would be a good way to approach this. However, if you're not already familiar with Python you could look at Model Builder, as this will give an easier GUI to get you started. Here is a quick example of a model which uses Select By Attributes to narrow down a layer, then uses the output of this to Select By Location: ...


3

If your bathymetric data are current in the form of survey points then you should interpolate them onto a raster grid of the same resolution and extent as your LiDAR data. There are several methods for interpolating these points available in ArcGIS such as splining, IDW and kriging. The most appropriate method to use will depend on your data characteristics ...


2

When you Display X/Y Data, setting the Coordinate System to GCS_WGS_1984 should give you values in decimal degrees.


2

If you have a Spatial Analyst license, then you can Reclassify the slope raster into five classes (0-3, 3-15, etc.). Then, the raster's attribute table will show how many cells are in each class and the area can be easily calculated. If you don't have the license or don't want to make a new raster, then Calavin's suggested method is ideal.


2

One way to get an area by doing a little manual work is to open up your DEM properties window on the symbology tab. Click on Classify... and click on your class break values in the window on the right. There will be an "Elements in Class" number on the bottom right of the window which is the number of pixels in that class. You can then multiply that number ...


2

I think your proposed solution may be too complicated. I don't think there really is any such thing as a "non-spatial database". In my view, there's just data, some of which happens to have geometry, and some of which doesn't happen to have direct relationship to geometry (in the end, most data is at least somewhat spatial). Best practice for integration ...


2

I've always get the failed to load table error when dragging or trying to access xlxs sheet in ArcGIS. One option that works for xlsx is the Excel to Table tool.


2

The image needs to be cut apart and re-mosaiced after adjusting the colors in each piece. This can be done. As an example, I extracted the green band of the image. To make my work simple (the computing platform I am using, Mathematica 9, does not easily extract pixels along arbitrary polylines), I rotated it to make some of the image boundaries perfectly ...


2

Histogram matching works by forcing the histogram of one image to match as closely as possible the histogram of a second target image. I'm afraid that it won't work on a single image. (There is the exception of using Histogram Matching to force an image to theoretical distribution, like the Gaussian, but that won't help in this case either.) Also, I'm not ...


2

Right clic the Feature class in ArcCatalog and go to the Properties. In the Feature Extent tab, clic on Recalculate. And voilĂ ! I'm using ArcGIS 10.2.1


2

If I understand well, what you want is smooth boundaries. Therefore you should use focal statistics with the MEAN value and a small (3*3) window. Low pass filter could also help. As a remark, this function will not "add" pixels between each class. It will create a gradient of 3 3 3 2.66 2.33 2 2 2 from 3 3 3 3 2 2 2 2. If you want a value between your ...


2

You could try this in two different ways, either rotating your symbology (mark each location with a symbol that points at ), or rotating a label (each location has a static point symbol, and label rotated). Here's the Esri help page for each method: Rotate the label: Setting label rotation using a numeric field. I think this would work better for your ...


2

If you do not want to create new features, but just get a fast count, you can perform Select By Location twice. The trick is to use a different Selection Method the second time: select from the currently selected features in. In other words, first Select By Location to find what intersects your polygon (using the regular "select features from" selection ...


2

If the Excel sheet contains point coordinates and you want to make a shp, you first need to create an event layer. File, Add Data, Add XY data. Then you can go to Data, Export Data to create your shp.


2

when you are at the step of exporting, look at the bottom of the dialogue box and make sure the type is set to shapefile, sometimes it defaults to dbf. Hope that helps.



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