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4

Could you do something like: Pre-Logic Script code: def mathFunction(y1, y2, x1, x2): return math.Atan(math.fabs(y2-y1) / math.fabs(x2-x1)) * (180/math.pi) Field = (on the bottom)...populate with your fields for y1,y2,x1,x2 mathFunction(!FIELDY1!, !FIELDY2!,!FIELDX1!,!FIELDX2!) See Python doc on the math module.


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One of multiple solutions. Create points inside polygon, fishnet will do. Add vertices of polygons to this set. Create TIN. Export tin triangles and clip them: Updated answer on points creation. Script below works from ArcGIS and takes 3 parameters: Layer in TOC. Used to define extent. Distance between points, type double Points layer (empty) import ...


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As mentioned by @nicholaschris, Zhu et al's paper is nice, and they have a tool associated with it. Note that the shift is a function of 1) the position of the sun (doesn't vary on one image), 2) the position (XYZ) of the cloud and 3) the elevation of the ground (2 and 3 do vary). So that a unique shift could not be enough. To answer the question with ...


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Model builder, to my knowledge, does not expose the data driven pages functionality that you access on the toolbar. If you want to automate map output with data driven pages then you must use python and arcpy. Search help for DataDrivenPages (arcpy.mapping). From this page there is also a link to building map books.


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You can do this in two steps. First, use Con (Spatial Analyst) to convert cells > 50 to 1 and all other cells to 0. Then use Zonal Statistics as Table (Spatial Analyst) to count the number of "1" cells within your polygon.


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You can use the Feature Vertices to Points tool with BOTH_ENDs option checked, on your lines, that will give you start/end points of the lines. Then Add XY Coordinates to populate the resultant points with Lat / Long values. Another way to go about your workflow.


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Did you take a look at any those lines to see what might be going on? Their start and end points may actually be in the same place, if they were drawn incorrectly. Select one of them and zoom to it. If it shows up as a point, that's why the XY coordinates of the start and end points are the same. Depending on the coordinate system you're using, it's also ...


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You have coordinates in DMS (degree minute second) format, and need to get them into DD (decimal degree) to import easily into ArcMap. While in Excel, make a new column. This would be the formula to just convert from DMS to DD: degrees, plus minutes divided by 60, plus seconds divided by 3600. =MID([DMS], 2, 2)+(MID([DMS], 5, 2)/60)+(MID(A6, 8, 4)/3600) ...


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The following ESRI Knowledge Base artcile details the steps to turn your data from Excel into a shapefile. Hopefully you will find this is all you need. http://support.esri.com/en/knowledgebase/techarticles/detail/27589 Note: You will have to convert your coordinates to decimal degrees. Following @Erica's comment, and indeed a re-reading of your ...


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Hornbydd is correct. There's an out of the box tool to do this called data driven pages. Data driven pages is based on the old school DS Map Book. It gives you the ability to make a map book series and strip maps. There's a handy cartography tool box with a tool for building a polygon index grid over data (like your lines), this in turn can be used in data ...


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The only way that I know of to do this, requires spatial Analyst so perhaps I'll write it up as such and if it is possible another way, someone else will write that up as a separate answer. With the Spatial Analyst Extension, the tool to use is Zonal Statistics. I typically use Zonal Statistics As Table. I typically use a projected coordinate system ...


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The problem with this statement is the parenthesis.. Compound statements need to be enclosed in a 'block': Con((Condition1) | (Condition2),True_value,False_value) The correct syntax for the field calculation is: Con(("%DEM_Aspect%" <= 90) | ("%DEM_Aspect%" >= 270),1,0)



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