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20

You can use basemap layers to solve this. Once you are happy with the symbology of your layers you can right click the data frame and select New Basemap Layer (see below) which is similar to a group layer. You can then drop the layers into this group, it will redraw them once and then 'store' this view rather than redrawing every time you make a change. If ...


16

Use the Erase (Analysis) Tool:


14

The easiest way to do this is to add a new integer field to the attribute table of the parcels layer. Then, run field calculator with the following expression: !Shape!.pointCount-!Shape!.partCount The !Shape!.pointCount returns the total number of vertices in the feature. However, the first vertex of each part is repeated at the end, in order to close the ...


11

In the Help for Supported raster dataset file formats it says: ArcCatalog only recognizes the .jpg file extension by default. To add .jpeg or .jpe files to ArcMap without renaming them, add those file extensions to ArcCatalog or drag those files from Windows Explorer into your map.


10

you can right click on the field name, click Properties, then press the ... next to Numeric and finally "rounding". You will then be able to format your number as you wish (well, it will be 2.61). EDIT: Just to make things clear, my initial answer is for visual rounding because field calculator was not mentioned in the question (I've added the tag). Now I ...


9

dmahr provided a good solution to count vertices. For a non-programmatic way to label each point with the XY coords, try the following workflow: Feature Vertices to Points Add two new fields (type: double) in the new point FC "X", "Y" Calculate geometry. Right click field > Calculate Geometry... > X Coordinate of Point (repeat for Y field) Add another ...


9

The WGS_1984_Web_Mercator_Auxiliary_Sphere coordinate system is a PROJECTED coordinate system, its units are METERS. Your coordinates are read in meters so they fall near the origin of the coordinate system which is the meeting of the equator and the Greenwich meridian. If you want to map Lat/Long coordinates (degrees), use a GEOGRAPHIC coordinate system ...


9

A "feature class" is an abstract name for source data for mapping. The origin of that data can be shapefile, file geodatabase, enterprise geodatabase, or any number of other sources (feature class factories). File and enterprise geodatabase sources are tables, with naming constraints that include: The initial character must be alphabetic The remaining ...


8

Since Erase (as @Jens linked) only is available with an Advanced license, you can download ET Geowizards. It can be installed as an Arcmap toolbox. Although you have to pay for the full suite, there's a free part of the program and the Erase function is included there (Overlay group).


8

You can put this as the label expression for the feature: def FindLabel(yourField): if yourField is not None: split_field = yourField.split(" ")[0] return str(split_field) else: return None Using Python as the parser and checking the Advanced box. Replace yourField with whatever field you are using to label.


8

The following example shows how to integrate the built-in python method .upper() with the arcpy update cursor. This example first tests if a field is of type String then checks each row within that string for lowercase values. If there are lower case values, the row is updated with all upper case. import arcpy fc = r'C:\temp\test.gdb\yourFC' desc = ...


8

You can use this command to replace all comas in the fields of your Species column with spaces: regexp_replace( "Species", ',', ' ' ) In this post answered by Nathan, the regex_replace function is described by : regexp_replace(string,regex,after) So in your case: 'string' is your column (species) 'regex' is the character you want changed (coma) ...


7

When opening Field Calculator, if using the VB Script parser (the default) you can use the Abs() function around your field name. Similarly, if using Python, use abs() around your field name.


7

The only way I know of to do this without creating many feature layers (one for each level of transparency) is to create a raster with an alpha channel. Here is one possible workflow you can try: Use Polygon to Raster to convert your polygon features to a raster. Reclassify the data as desired (using 8-bit unsigned integer with values from 0-255 works ...


7

Many thanks to @Erica for the reply, which for some reason didn't work for me. But it did put me on the right track to finding a solution, which was to use the Minimum/Maximum Stretch, in combination with the Edit High/Low Values option: Importing this symbology into the other rasters caused the correct stretch to be applied to all images.


7

Rather than try to use the ArcMap application alone, I have brought ArcPy into the picture. I just tested and achieved what you described using the UniqueValuesSymbology (arcpy.mapping) class which has a writable classDescriptions property which can be set to: A list of strings or numbers that represent the descriptions for each unique value that can ...


7

You can make ArcCatalog recognize .jpeg files by adding it as a File Type in ArcCatalog options. Inside ArcCatalog: From the main menu choose: Customize Select ArcCatalog Options Under the File Types tab choose New Type... Enter "jpeg" and "JPEG Image" .jpeg images will now display in ArcCatalog. UPDATE: For ArcMap, you have to separately add .jpeg as ...


7

There are two ways to get at the Create Features window from the Editor toolbar: 1) Start Editing. Right-click on toolbar and select "Editor" 2) In the editor toolbar: Editor > Editing Windows > Create Features Alternatively, the right most button on the editor toolbar:


7

In Windows explorer copy and paste the following location in the address bar and replace username with your username on the machine with the arcGIS install on it.: C:\Users\username\AppData\Roaming\ESRI\Desktop10.1\ArcMap\Templates Delete normal.mxt (your mxd template) this will restore you mxd to it stock/original format with all your toolbars and windows ...


7

As troubleshot by @Paul, the error message is being triggered because you have placed your *.gsg file inside of a file geodatabase folder (*.gdb). It seems like the Maximum Likelihood Classification tool is getting confused by this. However, the error can be easily avoided by ensuring that your *.gsg file is NOT inside of a file geodatabase folder (*.gdb). ...


7

Yes, but sort of. ArcGis no longer has line-node topology that enables the user to tell how many arcs (lines) are connected at their ends (nodes). To check is one thing, but how about to fix instead? If you open the feature class in ArcMap and then use planarize lines (give a tolerance) and the lines will be snapped and split at intersection - saves a lot ...


7

Building on Michael's excellent answer, I would recommend using the Con (Spatial Analyst) tool to take a "slice" out of your DEM. The first screenshot shows the parameters you would likely want to use. The second screenshot shows the results of the Con function (as stylized MDOW hillshades) derived from the resulting DEM's.


7

ArcMap respects the default font size of the operating system. You can change the font size in your control panel. You can also turn on magnification to make all "Classic" Windows apps larger and more readable.


6

Speaking from personal experience, it is easy to corrupt a GDB if you manipulate the files individually outside of ArcGIS (i.e. ArcMap or ArcCatalog) with something like Windows Explorer. The individual files that you describe make up the guts of a GDB. Instead of adding these individually to a folder, you should be able to locate, view and utilize the GDB ...


6

You can use the symbology option 'multiple attributes' and set the size min/max for the symbol to the same, and it will create a dot in the middle of each polygon. also, you could probably do the same with maplex labeling to place a '.' label at the centroid of each shape


6

An alterntive to ian's suggestion, you can change your label expression to something like the following. By importing the regular expression module, you can create function to only display numbers at the beginning of a string. def NumberLabel(addressField): import re return re.search('^\d*', addressField).group() As per Ian's example, use python ...


6

I think what you are actually trying/wanting to do is create subtypes as shown in the graphic here. You can then apply domains by subtype. In your example type would be a domain of plastic and metal, which in turn would be subtypes, and then metal would have a domain of yes/no for rusted, but plastic would have a domain of N/A or whatever other option. ...


6

Wikipedia defines sinuosity as: the ratio of the curvilinear length (along the curve) and the distance (straight line) between the end points of the curve So to calculate this in ArcGIS, you would need to determine: the curvilinear length of the line. You can use the Field Calculator the start and end points of the line. See this Stack Exchange ...


6

There is two ways of doing this, the best is with Spatial Analyst using Extract by Attributes using the query value < 1.5, this will put NODATA in the areas where the height is greater than 1.5m. If you want to cap the raster to 1.5 so that the values are 1.5 where the raster exceeds 1.5 then use con: Con(InRaster,InRaster,1.5,"value <= 1.5") will ...


6

You could calculate the field beforehand in Excel, or you can also do this in ArcMap. You need to add a field to your table (make sure you aren't in an edit session, thanks Sara). This will be for the % change. calculate the percent change in that field, using the Field Calculator. Possibly something like: ((table.INCOME_2005 - table.INCOME_1995)/ ...



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