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0

Yes, it is possible and easy. But you must remember that if you want to: a) select any parcel, just use the original layer with the associated non-spatial tables, and you will get the desired results; b) search any parcel, you must save the original layer with the associated non-spatial tables under a new name and then make the query in this new layer.


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http://resources.arcgis.com/en/help/arcgis-rest-api/index.html#/Dynamic_Layer_Table/02r3000000q0000000/ supportsAdvancedQueries would return false in the following scenarios: The layer / table resides in a workspace other than an enterprise database or File Geodatabase. The layer / table is joined with another layer / table from a different workspace. We ...


1

Since I can't comment due to not enough reputation points, I wanted to mention that I was trying to deal with a similar issue (for anyone else that finds this page useful). I had been using Python and made a nice for loop that ran fine, however it did not update my symbology. I did find that you need to first open the .mdx document, set the df, update the ...


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There are many methods available and they all have pluses and minuses. See http://resources.arcgis.com/en/help/main/10.2/index.html#//01m800000015000000 for some but not all. The advantage of the Integrate tool (or Validation of two layers in a topology) is that it happens with little work, but only if the differences are within the tolerance. You can ...


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I believe what you are searching for is called Integrate (ArcGIS Help 10.2 - Integrate (Data Management)): Integrate is used to maintain the integrity of shared feature boundaries by making features coincident if they fall within the specified x,y tolerance. Features that fall within the specified x,y tolerance are considered identical or coincident.


-1

click and drag the toolbox and/or any floated windows to desired position (could be left or right) automatically the arrow direction to desired position appear, then double click on the floated windows.. the window menu will attached on the arcview side panel bar...


0

If you use Maplex labeling, you can check the remove duplicates box, under the label density tab, in placement properties. This will label each classification in your feature once and only once.


3

You can do this using the Mean Center tool in the Spatial Statistics toolbox, it will compute the average X and Y coordinates for a set of points that you specify and generate an output point. You can specify groups of points in your source data for which individual centers will be computed using the Case Field in the tool, so you would use "Name" as your ...


2

I am not sure if this is the best way to do it. But you could create polygons around the points, either draw them or use something like bounding container. Then calculate the centroid of the polygon. Then create the labels for the polygon feature and turn the labels on. Symbolize the poly feature with no color and no outline so only the label appears. You ...


1

The method that you used for 'excluding' data only applies to the symbology. So you are not really modifying the data, just what you see. I would create a new raster that removes the data from the waterbodies. More than one way to go about this. It also depends on your area of interest. You could use the Set Null tool to remove the values of the water ...


0

What you are looking for is the Cell Statistics tool. This can calculate the sum of a bunch of rasters. You can find it in the 'Spatial Analyst' - 'Local' toolbox. This tool can also work around NoData values in your dataset.


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I would use ET GEOWOZARD. You can split by equal parts in this tool. This tool tracks attributes too. Or If you need just splitting by equal size the try the following code. import arcpy arcpy.env.overwriteOutput = 1 in_fc = r'C:\Users\USER_NAME\Documents\ArcGIS\centerline1.shp' out_fc = r'C:\Users\USER_NAME\Documents\ArcGIS\split_eq.shp' out_count = ...


1

Here's the arcpy script. It will take a while to run, but should print out the information you need. On the desktop, create a new text file call "script.py" (rename the extension to .py instead of .txt), right-click, Edit in IDLE, paste in the following code, change the paths, and then hit F5 to run it. import arcpy shp = r"C:\path\to\shapefile.shp" ...


3

Below is some code in VBA that shows how to set the extent of the viewer window to the current map. The key interface is IMapInsetWindow which gives you access to the IMapInset2 and it's read/write properties. Public Sub updateMapView() ' Get map document Dim pMXDoc As IMxDocument Set pMXDoc = ThisDocument ' Get Map Dim pMap As IMap ...


2

I set the data frame projection to WGS84 Web Mercator (Auxiliary Sphere) as suggested by Nahas and this didn't change the end result. However looking at the previous thread supplied by Vince (QPJ files on ESRI software) the answer at the bottom suggested deleting the prj. and .qpjs files then bringing the data in. I did this, assigned projection to WGS84 ...


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The EPSG: 3857, WGS 84 / Pseudo Mercator in QGIS is called WGS84 Web Mercator (Auxiliary Sphere) in ArcGIS. You are simply not using the right projection.


1

Using the WMS tile service from http://lasigpublic.nerc-lancaster.ac.uk/arcgis/services/LandCoverMap/LCM2007_GB_25m_V2/MapServer/WMSServer can load the Landcover tiles in with QGIS You can save out for local files or create vector file from raster using the grass tools (r.to.vect)


1

I feel your question is poorly titled. Your features are labeled but you are concerned that at certain scales the labels are suppressed. The common way that this is acheived (to prevent clutter like @Hornbydd says) is by setting minimum and maximum scales at which those labels are displayed:


1

The CEH data is a single band greyscale Tiff that has an Esri .lyr file associated with it to style it with the appropriate colours. This is not the most straightforward option for this dataset but it is consistent with other datasets that have multiple colour schemes. Digimap now provide a QML file along with the Layer file to make the data more ...


3

Do you have the Data Reviewer extension? The Data Reviewer allows you to "Browse" through all features with the simple click of the "Next" button (zooms to both spatial location and attribute table record). There's a lot more functionality to Data Reviewer aside from this (such as flagging errors as "fixed", "marked" etc. and running batch jobs). Just an ...


3

You can force all labels to display by changing the placement properties. Go to layer properties > Labels Tab > Placement Properties > Conflict Detection and tick on Place overlapping labels It will look a mess when you zoom out but then you get all labels.


0

You can get your desired data after making a free account on this website earthexplorer.usgs.gov You can download landsat7 as well as landsat8 satellite imageries from this site and can perform image classification in order to get required land cover.


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Here is the arcpy version of zoom to next feature. You may run this in your ArcMap python window: mxd = arcpy.mapping.MapDocument("CURRENT") # currently opened map doc df = arcpy.mapping.ListDataFrames(mxd, "Layers") [0] # define layer you want to iterate and zoom on for lyr in arcpy.mapping.ListLayers(mxd): if lyr.name == 'myTOCLayerNameHere': ...


5

First part is the AddIn, the real work is done on a form: Inherits ESRI.ArcGIS.Desktop.AddIns.Button Private pForm As fFeatureInspector Public Shared IsFormLoaded As Boolean = False Public Sub New() End Sub Protected Overrides Sub OnClick() 'My.ArcMap.Application.CurrentTool = Nothing If Not IsFormLoaded Then pForm = New fFeatureInspector ...


3

In this case, the same thing could be accomplished with !FieldName!.lstrip("0").


5

A bit explanation why the OP's function is not working: f1 = a string list= a list When you are iterating over the list, for each member of list you will get either positive or negative response. So your list has nine members; you will get nine responses(+ and -). Then what the calc function will return, whole nine responses or one? Of-course python ...


3

You could just check if your field value is in the remove list: def remove_zero(field): remove_list = ['01ST', '02ND', '03RD', '04TH', '05TH', '06TH', '07TH', '08TH', '09TH'] if field in remove_list: field = field.replace('0','') return field else: return field Then you'll want to do: remove_zero(!FIELDNAME!)


1

One solution (and a great chance to implement itertools) would be: import arcpy, os, itertools infc = r"C:\MyFolder\MyGDB\MyInputFeatureClass" # Replace with the path to your input feature class outfc = r"C:\MyFolder\MyGDB\MyOutputFeatureClass" # Replace with the path to your output feature class spatialref = arcpy.Describe(infc).spatialReference if not ...


2

To simply state your problem, you have one set of points with a value but those points/values apply to both ends of a line; you want to add two different point values as separate attributes to one line. There are (at least) two ways to do this. The first is to extract the start and end nodes of all your lines as points. Since you have an Advanced license, ...


0

You will not be able to align these rasters in different coordinate systems especially since they are built from different datum. In the screen capture here, I have taken a raster with UTM projected coordinates and reprojected to GCS WGS 84. You can see the difference in linear shift of the corner of roughly 60m. Unless all of your rasters are projected in ...


0

Are the raster pixel sizes the same? If one is 3m and the other is 10m then there is no way that they can correctly overlap. I would look into that first. Second, if there is a common raster that you can clip it to outside of the ones you are using that shares that same cell size, then I would use that. Double check on the cell sizes to make sure that there ...


1

So with the help of Branco and FelixIP I repaired my code. Actually I did not need the update layer to be a list at all and I also needed to add the buffer with an arcpy.mapping.AddLayer to be later seen on the layout: if "something.mxd" in path or "otherthing.mxd" in path: if len(arcpy.Describe("myLayer").FIDSet.split('; ')) == 1: mxd ...


1

The following python script (which requires ArcGIS 10.1 or later) utilizes arcpy.da to take a shapefile as an input and create a spreadsheet with an entry for each vertex in each polygon present in the .shp (and I believe it works with lower level arcgis licenses). Object and sequence id's tie the points back to a specific position in a specific polygon. ...


3

The problem is in the arcpy.mapping.UpdateLayer(df, updateLyr, sourceLayer, True) part. Your variable updateLyr is a python list. The documentation says that: ListLayers always returns a Python list object even if only one layer is returned. So, take the first index of the list, and you should be good as long as you have items in there. See the ...


0

FelixIP,Thank you. You provides a good solution to solve the problem with the script, I tried to write a script that has achieved the functionality I want to achieve. import arcpy,os.path as op,arcpy.mapping as arcmap mxd=arcmap.MapDocument("CURRENT") lyr=arcmap.ListLayers(mxd,"Target")[0] workspace=op.dirname(lyr.dataSource) ...


2

You can insert pictures as symbols using the "Marker Symbol" in the style manager. In the Style Manager, after you have created your new style, you need to locate the Marker Symbols folder. You left-click with the mouse once and then move to the blank zone on the right. Here you right-click with the mouse, choose "new" and then "Marker Symbols". In ...


1

To my knowledge No. You can embed the fonts to an exported map if the build-in security flag of the font file allows it.


2

The script below is using following naming convention of layers in the table of content: "Target" - feature layer with geometries to be replaced "chops" - feature layer with correct geometries It works on selection, i.e. 1 feature selected in each layer. import arcpy, traceback, os, sys try: def showPyMessage(): ...


0

Try this field calculator (Python) on a new text field: def CN(nCols,nRows,j): nR=divmod(j,nCols)[0] nC=divmod(j-nR*nCols,nRows)[1] theDiv = divmod(nC,26); SecondL = theDiv[1] FirstL = theDiv[0]; aLetter = chr(65 + FirstL) + chr(65 + SecondL) aLabel = aLetter + str(nR).zfill(2) return aLabel CN(42,47, !PageNumber! ) If you want to see this:


1

Not that I can find. I've played with it a bit and you're right, the polygon/feature creation/construction tools don't seem to be accessible from within Replace Geometry. I can think of a couple of alternatives. Create a new feature, drawing your circle so that it completely covers the poly you want to replace, then choose Edit > Merge and pick the ...


2

Split raster does this, even keeps polygon geometry it chops single raster into bits and uses polygon geometry. Output base name is updated by seq.number, as always it is a 'bad' numbering i.e. image1, image2 etc while it should be image01, image02 etc if number of polygons > 9 and < 100. Would be helpful with sorting by name. Apart from this - great ...


3

I would use model builder for this. Use the feature iterator to cycle through each polygon and feed that into the clip raster tool. You would use in-line variable substitution to pass the polygon ID or unique name you used in the iterator to the output name of your new clipped raster. Here is the model: If you don't know anything about model builder, ...


2

An easier option than creating python addin would be to create a python script tool that uses various arcpy.GetParameterAsText(0) statements that relate to the Create Database Connection arguments, and then using conditional logic (if, else), is directed to open one of two map documents sourced to either test or production (already saved somewhere on your ...


1

Non-Arcpy If you don't want to go for arcpy, one solution is to create two separate Mxds. Right Click your original mxd in ArcCatalog and then click "Set Data Source...". In this way you can instantly create a new mxd file which points to your new connection file (e.g. ProductionDatabaseConnectionFile.sde). It takes about 10 seconds. If your original ...


1

Below is some code extracted from one of my training courses that should be adaptable to your situation: # Add field to Map Grid to hold grid references created by concatenating # outputs from looping values 1 to 8 from North to South and A to H from # West to East e.g. 1A to 8H for each of 64 maps ...


0

@Michael is probably be right. Your point feature class has M-values enabled, but you haven't set the M-value for each point. In fact, if you're not using the feature class for routing or reckoning distances (like mileposts), you don't need M-values enabled. An alternative to using the "Add Geometry" tool is to make two new fields called "X" and "Y" and ...


2

As an alternative to ArcMap, I just installed ArcGIS Pro 1.1 which now supports extent indicators. In my first test of using leader lines I created the style below which I don't think could be done out-of-the-box using ArcMap. There are various other styles and options to experiment with there.


0

I have same problem, I also did everything that you did - nothing works. Thank you for your research, I just installed VS2012 and it works fine, good enough for now. If you ever will find the solution - please write it here)


3

Intersect will output polygons. However it will also only output the lowest order geometry input. Meaning if you give it points and lines, you get points. Lines and polygons, you get lines. One option is to use the select by location tool. You can select all polygons that intersect your points. Then either export to a new file, or invert the selection and ...


1

Here's a very simple version I've made: Google Street View Python Add-in Unlike the SIGGIS version, it doesn't show the Street View in a window in ArcMap. It just opens the location in your internet browser.



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