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4

Couple things wrong in your loop. First you are calling dataset = datasets.Next(); at top and bottom of the loop. Right there you are skipping some feature classes. If your feature classes are nested in a Feature Dataset then you have to iterate through it also. It's a good idea to call IEnumDataset.Reset() before starting the loop to ensure you are at the ...


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The two most likely causes (that I can think of) are; 1) The SDE Geodatabase configuration keyword includes a PRECISION statement and you likely have converted the feature class form high precision to single precision. -- In most storage projections (we use Stateplane, for example) there is insufficient precision to get fine detail so vertices coalesce and ...


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You don't have to worry since the changes you perform in the geodatabase domain will be reflected in all feature classes which has fields using this domain. For instance, you have a gdb domain called StatesNames. It is of coded values type and has a couple of code-value pairs: TX - Texxas CA - Callifornia NY - New YYork When users created features, they ...


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Relational database software generally permits multiple tables with the same name if they are: Owned by different users, or Placed in different databases (for RDBMSes which support multiple containers within an instance) The usual way to distinguish which table is being referenced is by prefixing it with the owner name (and a period separator). The ...


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It had to do with ArcFM, which I had a feeling was the problem. The script needs to checkout a license. They have a sample script available: How-To - Work with ArcFM features in Python Solution As when working with ArcFM features in VBA, ArcGIS for Desktop, or anywhere else, an ArcFM license is required to edit the features...


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I think your best bet would be to create a Python script that takes the inputs and calls the SQL stored procedure through something like pyODBC (or pyMSSQL). Then attach the script to a script tool with the input indexes in the correct order. One missing piece that I can think of would be returning the results to ArcMap directly. Otherwise, you may have ...


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Here's an example you can reference. It prints the results to both the console and to a text file, but you could easily manipulate it to write to a .csv file. Hope this helps. -ST Results : Feature Class Name : CR.CANADA1 Geometry Type : Polygon Has Spatial Index : True Spatial Reference : GCS_North_American_1927 Field Name : ...


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According to this example: public void RegisterDataset(IDataset dataset) { IVersionedObject3 versionedObject = (IVersionedObject3)dataset; bool IsRegistered; bool IsMovingEditsToBase; versionedObject.GetVersionRegistrationInfo(out IsRegistered, out IsMovingEditsToBase); if(IsRegistered) { if(IsMovingEditsToBase) { ...


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A spatial reference is not a nominal metadata property which can be changed at will. Once set, it cannot be changed. Deletion is the only supported mechanism for changing an SRID. Once you register a table with ArcGIS, it should only be deleted with geodatabase-aware tools (Desktop, Python, ArcObjects .Net/Java). When registered only from ArcSDE ...



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