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0

I finally figured that the culprit was my scipy installation and its incompatibilities with the numpy inlcuded with arcpy, etc. Solution: a repair put everything back in order and database connections work perfect. Now my problem is to find a working 64-bit numpy-scipy stack that does plays well with ArcGIS. For 32-bit, the official 32-bit release from here ...


1

Your workflow will not technically be supported, so yes it is dangerous. Consider this documentation: Replication and geodatabase releases (10.2.x) http://resources.arcgis.com/en/help/main/10.2/index.html#//003n000000z3000000 Geodatabases built using previous versions of ArcGIS do not support some of the newer functions of ArcGIS. Consequently, if ...


0

The answer is yes that the number of rows in the sde_state_lineages table directly impacts performance of the geodatabase. 200k rows is not considered "alot" but that is relative to your available resources and assuming there are no versioning issues that would require a diagnose/repair. Continue to compress often. From your naming conventions it looks like ...


0

If you've already compiled the PUBLIC and SDE schema after setting the user library, that error message looks like you do not have the actual EXTPROC_DLLS environment variable on your Oracle server. From your settings it looks like your Oracle is on Windows. Your listener path and user library point to your st_shapelib.dll residing in the ArcSDE home. ...


2

I would suggest you avoid procedures that are documented as being "legacy" when working with new databases. Cross-database queries in SQL-Server are inefficient, and should be avoided as general practice, but if you really want to create such a view, the table should have a native geometry type (GEOMETRY or GEOGRAPHY). Then all you need to do is register ...


2

Well, the answer to that really is "It depends". Both options are very viable solutions for your problem and would likely fully be able to meet your needs. However, some things you should consider when making this decision: Model Builder uses the graphic user interface of the geoprocessing tools you are likely already used to using and the parameters in ...


2

It turns out that it was a problem of tolerance and resolution. When we created the feature datasets in the SDE geodatabase, we were simply accepting the default XY tolerance and XY resolution, which was not as precise as we needed it to be. We created new feature datasets and manually set the tolerance and resolution to match that of the feature class as it ...


3

I agree with ian. Please see below. It seems like you're upgrading an Oracle ArcSDE geodatabase but using the old connection syntax to do so. This would be the 10.0 connection syntax used within ArcGIS Desktop 10.1, which should not be used and will cause an upgrade operation to fail: Here is what it should look like (server/service): You can also ...


-1

Yeah - you can use Model Builder/Python and the "Field Mapping" Technique to accomplish this.


0

Do you really need to connect directly to the database? You can use the harvest from ArcSDE: http://geonetwork-opensource.org/manuals/trunk/eng/users/managing_metadata/harvesting/sde/index.html


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The most important thing 9.x users need to know is that ArcSDE no longer exists. There had been no fundamental changes to the ArcSDE API since 9.0, when XML, INT64, UUID, CLOB, NSTRING and NCLOB types were added. Since then, the only changes have been Projection Engine mods to support newer projections and vertical datums. The API itself is now deprecated ...


1

It had to do with ArcFM, which I had a feeling was the problem. The script needs to checkout a license. They have a sample script available: How-To - Work with ArcFM features in Python Solution As when working with ArcFM features in VBA, ArcGIS for Desktop, or anywhere else, an ArcFM license is required to edit the features...


3

The two most likely causes (that I can think of) are; 1) The SDE Geodatabase configuration keyword includes a PRECISION statement and you likely have converted the feature class form high precision to single precision. -- In most storage projections (we use Stateplane, for example) there is insufficient precision to get fine detail so vertices coalesce and ...


2

Relational database software generally permits multiple tables with the same name if they are: Owned by different users, or Placed in different databases (for RDBMSes which support multiple containers within an instance) The usual way to distinguish which table is being referenced is by prefixing it with the owner name (and a period separator). The ...


2

You don't have to worry since the changes you perform in the geodatabase domain will be reflected in all feature classes which has fields using this domain. For instance, you have a gdb domain called StatesNames. It is of coded values type and has a couple of code-value pairs: TX - Texxas CA - Callifornia NY - New YYork When users created features, they ...


0

We're seeing similar behaviour. In the sense that ArcMap 10.2.1 is significantly slower with select/clip of large oracle spatial datasets. I haven't gotten down to tracing the sql statements, although the query plan looks different for slow/fast performing databases. We suspect it might have something to do with the spatial index parameters. Check the ...


4

Couple things wrong in your loop. First you are calling dataset = datasets.Next(); at top and bottom of the loop. Right there you are skipping some feature classes. If your feature classes are nested in a Feature Dataset then you have to iterate through it also. It's a good idea to call IEnumDataset.Reset() before starting the loop to ensure you are at the ...


0

I stumbled on this thread when I ran into a similar GDB_Release table not found issue with ArcSDE 10.2.2 and SQL express. I just wanted to post what worked for me. In my case, simply stopping and starting the database in ArcCatalog fixed it.


1

Here's an example you can reference. It prints the results to both the console and to a text file, but you could easily manipulate it to write to a .csv file. Hope this helps. -ST Results : Feature Class Name : CR.CANADA1 Geometry Type : Polygon Has Spatial Index : True Spatial Reference : GCS_North_American_1927 Field Name : ...


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Without more information it's difficult to be positive, but the likely cause of your "invalid entity" error is an invalid entity (the geometry scan on the view found a nil or multi-part polygon when your -e parameter only allowed for single-part polygons). The safest way to create views is to look at the properties of the feature class on which the view is ...


1

I think your best bet would be to create a Python script that takes the inputs and calls the SQL stored procedure through something like pyODBC (or pyMSSQL). Then attach the script to a script tool with the input indexes in the correct order. One missing piece that I can think of would be returning the results to ArcMap directly. Otherwise, you may have ...



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