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3

Not sure I am understanding the workflow correctly but like Beck said I think this is does the trick. Foo is the original shapefile you are deleting all the features from, Bar is the layer you are copying features from. import arcpy # Data foo = r'C:\Path\to\layer\that\will\be\blank.shp' bar = r'C:\Path\to\layer\that\gets\copied.shp' # Delete Features ...


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I realize this question is old but maybe someone will benefit from my contribution. I encountered same problem while working on Add-In for ArcMap 10.0. There is documented bug for 10.0 regarding IGPToolCommandHelper2 described here. I found workaround how to open tool's dialog and avoid "Failed to open tool SomeTool (SomeToolbox.tbx)" error. Here is the ...


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This help topic should get you started -- basically you embed your toolbox in a Python package and install it in your local Python installation. Then your tool should show up automatically under system toolboxes.


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You should add the toolbox to the Normal.mxt - and copy this customized Normal.mxt to each user's install files location. See the last section of the Fundamentals of saving your customizations help page for more details. So if I understand correctly (never tried myself): When opening ArcMap, ArcGIS uses the Normal.mxt from the user profile (usually ...


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yes, this is feasible. yes, here is an example: https://developers.arcgis.com/javascript/jssamples/portal_addshapefile.html rather than esriRequest, you will need to pass the zipped file as one of your inputParameters when calling Geoprocessor.execute()


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These 17 NDVI layers contains values range from -1 to 1. If you want to see the spatial variation i.e. where is the high/low vegetation then you need spatial analyst extension. Workflow for high vegetation is as below. 1.Load all 17 layers in the arc map and Cell Statistics Tool 2.Go to Toolbox>Spatial Analyst>Local>Cell Statistics 3.Set overlay ...


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Sorry,My English is not so good.But it may be useful to you. You can use [Make Query Table] Tool in ArcToolBox: Add feature class and table to the input table. Select the required field in the field list(eg.table.trip,table.datetime...),Most important point is you must select your featrue class's shape field too. If you forget it,the result be a TableView ...


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I think the problem is with what you are setting the output data type as. Here is a model that achieves the same thing as you are doing without the need of a separate python script! The Calculate Value tool is a model only tool which can use python if you need it.


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In your python script file you should replace output = where with : arcpy.SetParameter(1, where) Then in your script tool's properties edit the parameters so that your output where clause parameter has a 'Data Type' equal to SQL Expression and a 'Direction' equal to Output (see image). Save your .py file and the new script tool properties and remove and ...



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