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The vertically separate, but 2-dimensional overlapping parcels have to combine and accumulate both units and occupants. To collapse them to a single 2-D building parcel you need to do the following. Extract the centroid of the parcels with the Feature to Point tool and keep all attributes Use the Spatial Join tool with the parcels as the target and the ...


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Yikes. It's amazing to see the poor practices in place when creating parcel sets. There's a couple easy options here revolving around creating a copy of your feature class. You could make your selection, export to a new FC and then run a merge if you only have to calculate one use. If you need to find the areas for all of your land uses I would still create ...


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Create a new field in your feature class called "Acres". Open the Calculate Field tool. Select "Acres" as the field to calculate. In the expression section, put the following: "!shape.area@acres!". Use the "Select Layer By Attributes" tool to select features that are in your range. An express might look similar to this: "Acres" > 440 AND "Acres" ...


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Doing this kind of processing is pretty straight-forward, but there are some tricks along the way that will determine how accurate your analysis will be. Your data will be generated from a slope raster of the area, and you usually have to build it yourself. The easiest way is to use a DEM raster to calculate the slope, so you should start with that. Step 1: ...


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You can download a European-wide DTM from the European Environmental Agency Or use other open DTMs of Germany like this As your calculations are in SI units, you should probably use a projected grid like ETRS-LAEA (EPSG:3035) which is the scientific standard in the EU. Germany-specific grids will aslo work, as well as global ones, just make sure that all ...


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I would enclose the area in the above picture. In other words make a single polygon surrounding the points. Determine the area of the polygon. Then get a total point count within the area (all colors combined) I would then get a point count for each of the separate colors within that area. Find the percentages of each of the colors from the total point ...


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If the points are regular points having the same distance between each point, you can convert the points to raster instead of polygons. But you need to select the proper cell size, simply by measuring the distance among the points. Then you can Go Raster -> Conversion -> Rasterize. Set a vector layer to process, a field with values and desired raster ...


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Choose a different projection. I'm not as clued up as I should be with map projections, but I seem to remember that utm has a scale attached to. I remember it being in the order of what you mentioned you were getting. It also depends where on the globe your grid is situated and how small the area is covered by your grid. I think Albers Equal Area ...



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