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14

It means that the field is indexed. You can change the character used to indicate whether a field is indexed under the Table Options > Appearance menu:


8

The asterisk means that the field has an index. A Shapefile does not have any indexed fields by default, you need to add them. A GeoDatabase Featureclass always has a spatial index on the Shape field and attribute index on the ObjectID.


5

You can calculate natural break values using the PySAL library, then Reclassify or use those values as you choose. import arcpy, pysal from pysal.esda.mapclassify import Natural_Breaks as nb myArray = arcpy.RasterToNumPyArray(<PATH TO RASTER HERE>) breaks = nb(myArray.ravel(),k=<NUMBER OF CLASSES HERE>,initial=20)


3

The error you're getting is because the function is called SearchCursor(), with capital S and C.


2

Sorry. Wildcards are for use in strings, and unfortunately the double quotes around a column name don't mean that it's a string. Column names are "identifiers", which I think are basically object names, but I'm no expert. That doesn't mean that there is no way to do what you're asking, but it won't be happening in field calculator.


2

Just wanted to provide an update to this question, I know it was awhile back. So, yes, it is now possible to add a field to an already existing table in ArcGIS Online. Just open the attribute table, click on Table Options on the right hand-side, and then select Add Field.


2

The way I would go about doing this would be something similar to this in the Interactive Window... rowCounter = 0 #used for your row count comparisonCounter = 0 #used for your not identical count rows = arcpy.SearchCursor("YOURLAYERHERE") #creating the search cursor for row in rows: #go through the layer's records if row.FieldName1 == row.FieldName2: ...


2

Sorry, The solution was very simple, I needed to convert to character before converting to numeric: commune_5m@data$NUMERO2 = as.numeric(as.character(commune_5m@data$NUMERO)) ### Create numeric attribute from factor


2

Most likely the issue that is causing the "invalid field" error happens during the join. When you join two tables togeather in Arc, the field name will change. The alias of each field will stay the same (example: ossz). The actual field names however will change to a combined name based on the two table's names (example ossz.c) Check the real names out, ...


2

I found my answer here: As Jason sugested, just replacing /n, /r using they char. value will do the trick. And it did. !FieldName!.replace(chr(10), "").replace(chr(13), "") In field calculator returned the full value.


2

I would use below code-- If you have access to "Data Access Module" import arcpy,os,sys pattern = 'fish_46.shp' folder = 'C:\Users\USER_NAME\Desktop\delete'## root folder field = 'Id' ## your field where calculation to be applied files_process = [] for root,dirs,files in os.walk('C:\Users\USER_NAME\Desktop\delete'): for filenames in files: if ...


2

Go to View>Toolbar>Check Attribute. Then you will get an info icon in the toolbar. Now load a vector layer and start editing and double click on any feature.


1

This is a know bug and already has a ticket: https://hub.qgis.org/issues/10976 Hopefully it can be resolved for QGIS 2.8 which will be out soon.


1

And your licensing level. The "Generate Near table" tool in the ArcGIS analysis toolbox sounds like the one you need but this is "advanced" level. These tools also specify a maximum distance around which to search for near features, rather than a number of near features. If you specify no distance, all features will be compared. Bear in mind that this will ...


1

It is possible that you have a definition query on that feature class or shapefile in ArcMap. Right click the layer in ArcMap, and go to Properties. Then select the Definition Query tab. Make sure that this field is empty if you want no restrictions on what data you see. All of the data that you entered might be there, just not visible in arc. Good Luck!


1

One option is to first use the Join Field tool. Joins the contents of a table to another table based on a common attribute field. The input table is updated to contain the fields from the join table. You can select which fields from the join table will be added to the input table. But, beware because this actually alters the input table- it's not ...


1

This seems to be answered by the Calculate Field (Data Management) documentation: When calculating joined data, you cannot calculate the joined columns directly. However, you can directly calculate the columns of the origin table. To calculate the joined data, you must first add the joined tables or layers to ArcMap. You can then perform ...


1

I just realized that one of my column headers was solely a number -- which I thought I'd fixed. Sorry about that! If you're ever having this problem, please make sure none of your column headers are numbers; it makes QGIS assume it's a value instead of a header.


1

Use the Add Delimited Text Layer add option. It has much better handling of CSV then what OGR has via the Add Vector Layer add option.


1

I can't explain why your original raster does not have a populated count field - I thought it appeared by default for integer rasters. In any case, you can get those values by: Create a new integer raster, from your original, using Int. This will create a copy of the raster with Value and Count fields. Join the new raster back to the original raster based ...



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