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Well I did find a solution where I can just change the blank cells in my Excel file to zeroes (http://www.extendoffice.com/documents/excel/772-excel-fill-blank-cells-with-0-or-specific-value.html#a1). I was hoping to not have to go back to Excel though.


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You can do a spatial join between the two layers. This joins the two layers based on a spatial rule you can define. For ArcMap For QGIS


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Similar to what the other posters have said. Use arcpy.da.searchcursor and use the where clause. You can then set the where clause to be "where accuarcy > 80" or whatever you want. check out this resource http://resources.arcgis.com/en/help/main/10.1/index.html#//002z0000001r000000


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You can do this by looping through the shapefile first with a SearchCursor, creating a dictionary item for each "Key" field, where the value is a list of the "Accuracy" field values. Then loop through again with a UpdateCursor, compare with the maximum accuracy value from the dictionary, and delete the row as appropriate. import arcpy # Create dictionary d ...


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Your 'ENGL_NAME' shouldn't be abbreviated at all (less than 10 characters), but writeOGR has its own will, it seems. Instead of writeOGR(shp, "PolygonsV2", speciesname, driver="ESRI Shapefile") you might try currdir <- getwd() #store your current working directory setwd(paste(currdir,"PolygonsV2",sep="/")) #switch to your desired folder ...


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In geology, a common way to represent boreholes could be: borehole x y top thickness pH-Value 1 .. .. 0 20 4 1 .. .. 20 20 5 1 .. .. 40 20 7 2 ... ... 0 30 3 ..... This allows to represent vertical boreholes in 3D (with GRASS GIS here)


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Actually, in order to be most useful you probably want to keep the tabular data as you have it with a separate record (or attribute) for each depth. Combining the data from each depth into a single field will limit the use or make it much more difficult. With it separate you can look at each depth as a different surface in interpolation or perform any other ...


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Slightly off-topic, if you have gdal, you can also merge any number of shapefiles as follows on the command line: ogr2ogr -update -append ab.shp a.shp -f "esri shapefile" -nln ab ogr2ogr -update -append ab.shp b.shp -f "esri shapefile" -nln ab


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I would suggest using Vector/Data management Tools/Merge Shapefiles to One. I did a quick test using the data you supplied above, and also some of my own data, and both times it seemed to achieve what you wanted. Hopefully this helps you.



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