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21

There are only a few options to get attributes from ANY gis system into autocad. use FME (safe software) and export to autocad map / with object data. This would require the dwg be used in autocad map3d. and procedures below would apply from the open new blank drawing on. Use autocad map 3d to import the shapefile (or other gis format) and select ...


10

You can analyze polylines in amazing ways by using buffers. This is usually inefficient--buffers create many additional vertices--but (a) it is a technique available in many GISes (vector or raster based) and (b) it sometimes can produce information that is otherwise hard to get. In this case, buffering the road by a small amount and then buffering by the ...


8

If you have the roads in a spatial form, such as a Shapefile, you can load them into PostGIS and have it automatically find those using an SQL query. I've done this before - the SQL statement is designed to find for each road those that intersect geographically and create a nodal point for each crossing. I will try to clean this up later, but here is the ...


8

Expanding a bit on Marinheiro's answer: Even if the CAD data is georeferenced, there might still be some significant work to do to make it useable. I've often recieved CAD data that has georeferencing info in it, but the draftsman (or whoever produced it) simply ignored that and drew features all over the place. Then I have to manually align the features ...


7

You can do this in the Data Frame Properties for the inset window, under the Frame tab, use the Rounding setting. For a circle, just start with a square data frame and then set the rounding to 100%.


6

if they are drawing in just autocad, you will be relegated (restricted) to planar equal area coordinate systems as the output. if they are drawing using autocad map3d then there is at least a chance that the drawing is in an actual crs to start with. if 1 then you wil need to move, rotate, scale the dwg using a known point as "base point". I ussually do ...


6

Yes, you could do this with FME for sure. There are many "transformers" that handle cleanup, intersections, and topology; I would try the TopologyBuilder transformer in this case. Any scripting is all done in a graphic environment, so it is very simple to do. You can always get a trial version from www.safe.com (Disclosure: Mark Ireland, aka FME ...


6

All depends on your data. If your data is unstructured in dwg, then converting into shapefile will fail. For example, if you have polygons that are not polygons (closed polylines), but lines and polylines, then you will not be able to export them into polygons in shapefile. In that case you would have to create topology in AutoCAD Map which is out of the ...


6

Given that your autocad version is 12+ years old it may be an issue with autocad dwg or dxf file format version (major format version: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/.dwg#Version_history). You should try to open it in a newer version of ACAD, or try saving it into an older format.


5

Draftsight http://www.3ds.com/products/draftsight/draftsight-overview/ or even better DoubleCAD http://www.doublecad.com/Products/DoubleCADXTv3/tabid/1100/Default.aspx


5

Yes (if you have time to watch the video) "Show me how to bring in data and reproject it" (video at the bottom) http://docs.autodesk.com/MAP/2010/ENU/AutoCAD%20Map%203D%202010%20User%20Documentation/HTML%20Help/index.html?url=WS73099cc142f48755156818d10b290e6faa-7fe1.htm,topicNumber=d0e206720 video link ...


4

Perfect job for FME (www.safe.com) and with it you could also split your data in grid. It's very easy if you use the TILER transformer. You would have many DXF, but at least they would be workable. And FME is less subject to crash for this kind of job. Note that FME has a demo version.


4

if the data from your autocad file are georeferenced, when you convert from autocad to ArcMap, each layer results in a shape, and all the data in your shapes are automatically georeferenced


4

I agree with @whuber's comment that moving parcel geometry to try to match area values is a bad idea. Since GIS features and layers are only representative of "the real world" it is often difficult to make the digital geometry match the on-the-ground features. To me, your best bet is to stick with the geometries that are provided in the DWG (which were ...


4

You can use the query to report, or the export functions. I will wait on your reply to the comment question and fill in more detail.


4

QGIS does not manage Z coordinates importing CSV files. You can convert the CSV to DXF using ogr2ogr from the command-line shell. This should be already installed since QGIS uses OGR too. You need to create a .vrt file along your CSV. This is a plain-text file that you can create with any text editor. It is really easy in your case: ...


4

the two things you are asking for don't go together. If you want the layout it will ONLY have paper coordinates. If you want real world coordinates it will never know the orientation of your paper (or layout). The work around would be to get the data in the dataframe exported (using the export to cad function for each data layer you want in the drawing. (you ...


4

I do not think there is a easy way to do this since the geometry types are different. You have two options though: Model/create the symbol in ArcMap Symbol Property Editor. You really can almost make any symbol by stacking/rotating/sizing various symbols together, see e.g. below You could also just take a screen capture of the polyline graphic, ...


4

I have an answer, thanks to the insightful comment by FelixIP. Felix suggested exploding the linework might fix this issue. I passed this suggestion to the client, who said the following in reply: The original boundary was a closed shape which I have dropped (exploded) to individual line segments. This change fixed the issue. The engineer noted that he ...


4

reaname world file to .pgw from .pnwx. keep both image and world in same directory with same name.


4

First, when you bring your DWG into ArcMap, there is no need to convert it to another file type, unless you are trying to edit the linework. You can view the file and change the way it looks without doing any conversion. (If you do need to edit it, right-click on the Polyline layer in the DWG and choose "Data" and "Export Data." You can then export it ...


4

you should use the merge tool (or the append tool) to copy your points from one dataset to the other dataset. Launched from ArcGIS, the selection will be honored + this will reproject on the fly. Your points are probably moving because their projection was not defined. This can be done using the define tool. At the end, only one coordinate system is possible ...


4

you can use the dxf interchange format for CAD to export your data. This conversion tool is available in ArcMap (Conversion toolbox/to cad/ export to cad, then choose dxf as output format). from the other side, shapefiles can be imported in AutoCAD MAP 3D using insert > import panel > map import


4

AutoCAD is a vector drafting software so it doesn't have attributes in the traditional GIS sense like ArcGIS or other GIS's do. Its attributes are meant for the vector (line) parameters such as colour, line thickness, etc. You can add CAD fields to your shapefile and populate those fields with attributes prior to exporting to CAD which will control the ...


3

If you have ArcGIS available (I'm using 9.3.1), the easiest way will be to: Convert\export your shapefile into any file geodatabase and add it to your Arcgis Project; Label it using the attributes you need to show in CAD; Right-click the Layer Name in the content table and use the Convert labels to annotations option. Make sure you save the annotations in ...


3

Have you tried using ogr2ogr to convert the shapefile to DXF? It is quite powerful, writes to DXF, and is free to use. Supported formats You can download FWTools to make the install process a breeze.


3

Try this to import .SHP to AutoCAD and separate distinct attributes onto different CAD layers... In AutoCAD : Map-->Tools-->Import (or at the command line type MAPIMPORT) Select your .SHP (or .SHPs – you can bulk import) In the Drawing Layer column of the Import window, click the ellipses on the right-hand side of the box... Use the ‘Use data field ...


3

try FME , costs , but manages all your conversion problems For me it has been the best spatial tool in my job, i do file type conversion, i reproject data with it, i do some spatial db stuff with it. http://www.safe.com/


3

Older versions of CAD often would give you errors of drawing outside the limits. I found the LIMCHECK command would allow me to extend the limits of the drawing area. In newer versions of CAD though, this is not required.


3

As a person with this background I can talk directly to that topic. What employers are often looking for is people that have production linework experience; or the ability to do solid and consistent data creation work. CAD is often a lot less subjective; whereas GIS with is background in Enviro/Planning arenas has less of a rigid expectation.CAD shops often ...



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