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4

Use the Raster|Rasterize|Conversion (Vector to Raster) menu. Choose an appropriate resolution for the raster you need:


2

you could also do the conversion from degrees to meters which changes depending on the coordenates , on my case NE of Spain 0.000004°=0.9 mts approx. There are on line calculators like http://msi.nga.mil/MSISiteContent/StaticFiles/Calculators/degree.html


2

The solution was: Right-Click on the Layer > Save As > Change the CRS to (NC State Plane) > New Project > Project > Project Properties > On the Fly > NC State Plane > Vector > Geoprocessing Tools > Buffer > Unit = 98.424 (30 * 3.2808)


2

Try adding sr to arcpy.Polygon(polygon, sr)Here is the reason why: I sometimes see significant coordinate movement when I do not supply a Spatial Reference to an Arcpy Geometry object such as a Polygon or Polyline. Through research I've learned the default XY Resolution (significant digits) is .0001. This is correct for Projected data but much too large for ...


2

In your case, it is not necessary to create polygon buffers for your points. The raster::extract function has a buffer argument that will do exactly what you are after. library(raster) r <- raster(ncol=36, nrow=18) r[] <- 1:ncell(r) xy <- SpatialPoints(cbind(-50, seq(-80, 80, by=20))) extract(r, xy, buffer=1000000, fun=mean) For future ...


2

Why do you want to create a point output? Do the following: add a field and calculate the length of the "fligth line" intersect the "flight line" with the "buffer polygon" dissolve the "flight line buffer polygon line" depending on the "buffer polygon" calculate the length of the "flight line buffer polygon dissolve line" devide the length of the "flight ...


2

Instead of using QgsGeometryAnalyser, you could try calling the Processing function: import processing radiouses = [10.0, 13.0, 15.0] for r in radouses: shapeout = 'c:\\temp\\point_buf_%s' % r processing.runalg("qgis:fixeddistancebuffer", iface.activeLayer(), r, 99, False, shapeout )


1

I think the solution to what you call "buffer" is to create a MASK raster in GRASS. Then the r.neighbors analysis (and all other raster analyses) will be limited to the area covered by the mask. You would do that in GRASS by converting the polygon to a raster, and naming it MASK: v.to.rast input=<your polygon> output=MASK use=value


1

Here is an approach. Some example data: library(dismo) # points n <- 10 set.seed(123) xy <- cbind(runif(n, -150, 150), runif(n, -50, 50)) # polygons p1 <- rbind(c(-180,-20), c(-140,55), c(10, 0), c(-140,-60), c(-180,-20)) p2 <- rbind(c(-10,0), c(140,60), c(160,0), c(140,-55), c(-10,0)) p3 <- rbind(c(-125,0), c(0,60), c(40,5), c(15,-45), c(-...


1

I would suggest opening a bug report. In the mean time, try performing the buffer using the QGIS Geoalgorithms -> Vector geometry tools -> Fixed distance buffer in the processing toolbox, or from some other provider/plugin.


1

I imagine that this might be what you are after: If so, I think you have to first break up your polylines into lines, e.g. using the 'Explode lines' processing tool. Then, applying v.buffer as you mention above might leed to success. update What I just saw is that the 'Explode lines' tool shoots a little over the target, because it explodes each ...



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