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I think you want to exclude the intersection of the buffer in the where clause. WITH subq AS ( SELECT p.id, p.name, unnest(ARRAY(SELECT q.name FROM w_point q WHERE p.id != q.id AND NOT ST_Intersects(q.geom, ST_Buffer(p.geom, 0.1)) ORDER BY ST_Buffer(p.geom, 0.1) <#> q.geom LIMIT 5) ) as name FROM w_point p ) SELECT ...


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This can be achieved in several steps. Run a Spatial Join for your buffer polygons and road network layers (right-click the buffer polygons layer in the TOC and choose Join and Relates > Join). You will get an output polygon feature class which contains information on how many road features were located (even partially) within the buffered polygons. ...


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Your buffer distance is given in the units of your dataset. Your coordinate system is lon/lat geographic. Thus 0.01 = 0.01 decimal degrees. To be able to buffer by 1 km (1000 m) you need to reproject your dataset to a projected coordinate system which has units in metres. There are examples in the Python GDAL/OGR Cookbook of how to reproject layers and ...


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The easy way is to use Zonal statistics as a table to extract the mean value for all buffers, then join the table to your shapefile. However, there might be a problem if your buffers overlap : in this case, it gets more difficult because you need to iterate on each polygon (e.g. in model builder). Alternatively, you can use focal statistics with a circular ...



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