Tag Info

New answers tagged

0

Right-click the CSRS_0RN_NER_Buffer element and choose "Add To Display" That will work for the dataset if it's written to disk or "in_memory"


1

There are multiple ways to accomplish this, but none of the correct methods involve static conversion of degrees and linear units. In the past I've had to define my own equidistant or equal area coordinate system over each feature, but ArcMap offers a much simpler solution: Use Geoprocessing... Buffer, which invokes Buffer (Analysis), and then specify a ...


1

I don't think it'll show up if it is set to be temporary. I assume you want it temporary so that if another selection is made and the tool is run again, only the new buffer shows. One possibility, you could add a step to your model that, if a buffer exists, deletes the existing buffer before running.


1

After doing a bit of forum research, it appears you might be bumping into a few things. Restart the machine (worth a shot) Turn off background geoprocessing (You've done this) Check the name of any output/input files for any tools I would maybe put a print statement after the assignment of the "outfile" variable print outfile Take a look at the ...


0

You can't. As commenters note, a degree of longitude is a different distance at different latitudes, while a degree of latitude is pretty much constant. When you reproject, as recommended, there may be distance distortion. For example, Mercator projections exaggerate distance at higher latitudes. So if you project to meters, you must also understand how ...


1

You need to set a default value for the Selecting Features Layer. Ideally this would be the layer file the user is going to be selecting the most. Once there's a valid value in the Selecting Features layer variable, that oval should turn a different color and the model should run. It's one of those annoying little idiosyncrasies of ModelBuilder that will ...


1

I guess one way to do it would be to use the field calculator. In the QGIS field calculator, you can create a new attribute containing the area of each census polygon. Just open the field calculator and write $area in it, and set it to create a new column with that (let's call it Area1). Than you can use the intersect tool in the Vector menu on the census ...


1

I believe you can set predetermined variables as values for the input parameters. If you right click on the Buffer tool in Model Builder, and go to Make Variable --> From Parameter --> And then select the parameters which you want the user to set a value for Then set the default values in the Buffer tool properties that should stay constant (Side Type, ...


2

In model builder, you can set variables from a tool's parameter. In model builder, right click the tool, go to 'Make Variable', and click 'From Parameter'. Then you can set that variable to be a 'Model Parameter', which means the user will specify that variable. The other things will stay as you set them for the tool in model builder.


0

Look into Multipart To Singlepart (Data Management) it will break up the roads into single parts, which should make your selection more accurate.


0

first, you don't need spatial analyst for this second, you could have used multiple ring buffer for doing that, but I assume that you need all intermediate feature classes third, there are some indentation issues in your code import arcpy ... k = 2500 ... while k<=8500: ... arcpy.Buffer_analysis("sidla","sidlaBuff"+str(k),k) ... ...


0

Your double 'while' may be the cause. Rather than use two iterators, k and l, just use one. Let i = iteration count. i=0 while i<20 Buffer1=2500+500*i Buffer2=3000+500*i Buffer2-Buffer1=Result i=i+1


1

K and L are held in memory after your script runs. The last K and L will be 9500 and 9000, respectively, as your error suggests because after each buffer it adds 500 to the value of these variables and your erase is only calling the last value as it is outside of the WHILE loop. I would create another iterator and put erase inside of it to function after ...


4

Yes, you can have your buffer in meters just by adding Meters in your field 'BUFFER' like 1000 Meters, 250 Meters.. and so on. This is documented on ArcGIS resources - Buffer (Analysis) Here is the snippet from site stating this capability. If a field from the Input Features is used to obtain buffer distances, the field's values can be either a ...


6

Starting in ArcGIS 10.0, running the Buffer tool on a point or line feature class with a geographic coordinate system (e.g. WGS84, NAD83) results in geodesic buffers that are completely free of distortion. That is probably what happened here, except that your data frame's coordinate system is distorting the area. From the help page (emphasis mine): You ...


2

If you have a license for ArcGIS for Desktop Advanced (formerly ArcInfo license), you can use the Tabulate Intersection tool to do this. First, buffer your lakes, probably with the line_side parameter in the Buffer tool set to OUTSIDE_ONLY so you don't include the body of the lakes themselves. Then, run Tabulate Intersection with the following ...


0

ArcGis attempts to project your data when doing a buffer in inappropriate units, this works for smaller datasets, it cannot do this if the points are dispersed all over the globe as it can't pick one to suit the whole dataset. You are going to need to do each point (or cluster) individually, projecting to an appropriate projected coordinate system. For ...


2

To convert polygons to lines, use the Polygons to Lines Tool. To create random points along the line, use the Create Random Points Tool. To create new buffers, use the Buffer Tool.


1

You can combine the two functions I suppose that the projection of the two shapefiles are the same. 1) spatialRef = inputlyr.GetSpatialRef() gives you the projection of the original shapefile 2) prj = os.path.splitext(outputBufferfn)[0] + ".prj" gives you the name of the prj file of the buffer shapefile outputBufferfn = "a_shapefile.shp" ...


0

If not done already, calculate the area in a field for your polygons Create centroids. Area field should carry over to the points. Create and calculate a radius field that corresponds to a circle of the given area, for each point. The formula for circle area is A = pi*r^2, so r = Sqr(A/pi). Pi = 4*Atn(1). The exact VBScript field calculation is: Sqr ( ...


1

While the buffer wizard is not exposed through ArcPy, geometries do expose the buffer method so the following works to create multiple ring buffers: import arcpy def MultiRingBuffer(ringDistance, ringCount, inputLayer, outputLayer): buffers = [] cursor = arcpy.SearchCursor(inputLayer) for inputFeature in cursor: sourceOid = ...


1

As you have already mentioned in your comment Rudolf, you may have performed a Query which only filters out features, it does not perform any analytics. The Intersect will 'cut' out features which intersect one another and outputs the results in a new layer. The Intersect function can be found in: Vector > Geoprocessing Tools > Intersect


0

You can accomplish this using the following workflow: Add a new field to the multiring buffer "Value". This will be either 1 or 2. Use the Spatial Join (Analysis) tool to transfer the attributes of the buffer to the points.


2

If you're using the multiple ring buffer tool provided by arcgis, it includes a distance column in the output feature class (which you can rename or omit). It should have your 5km buffers listed in the attribute table with a value of 5 (it might be different if your spatial reference doesn't measure things in meters). I would simply select based on ...



Top 50 recent answers are included