Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

6

I wouldn't do this, especially not if I have ArcMap available or QGIS and want to keep my sanity whilst also having an understandable map! ArcMap and QGIS have some excellent cartographic tools which, in combination with appropriate symbology working directly on the data and what it means geographically (as opposed to merely post-processing an image) allow ...


4

Put the code below as the label expression for your feature in ArcMap. Set the parser to Python and check the Advanced box. Change [yourField] to the field containing the values you want to label. def FindLabel([yourField]): if [yourField] is not None: value = float([yourField]) if value < 1: return round(value, 3) ...


4

For what it's worth, support for these kinds of fills has now been added into QGIS and will be available from version 2.4. You just need to select "Shapeburst fill" as the symbol layer type: Additionally, the line offset algorithm has been improved so you shouldn't see the artifacts you were previously experiencing.


2

There are numerous books on the subject, some very specialized, some very general, and some just examples. One I used in a cartography class, that I would highly recommend for general foundation, is Dent's Cartography: Thematic Map Design.


2

What is it you need to accomplish that you cannot do in ArcMap? There isn't much that cannot be done directly in the ArcMap layout other then special effects on selected graphics (Transparencies, drop shadow, etc.) I would recommend doing all your cartography in ArcMap because, it is much easier, and if you miss some errors during production, it's easy to ...


2

You can try using the Maplex labeling engine which will give you more control than the standard labeling engine. In the labeling toolbar, enable Maplex. There are several options in which you can adjust the settings for feature weights and overlapping labels. See the ESRI documentation. Weights can range from 0 to 1,000. Features with high weights ...


1

Generally speaking, your first step will be to create lines between the origin and destinations. They can be simple straight lines, follow routes, or be representative curved lines - it all depends on how you want the map to look and the legibility of your mapped data. The next step is to get your passenger counts as attributes of the lines you create. ...


1

You can export the file as an EPS (In ArcMap go to File > Export Map and in the drop down just select EPS) and load it into GIMP. As long as you have GhostScript this should preserve each layer -- unlike saving as a JPEG, or PNG which just combines everything into an image -- so you don't have to export each layer/ feature individually. As for actual ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible