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5

ArcScene is the ESRI approach to doing this. It is likely installed with ArcGIS so you should find it in the start menu. This is a typical ArcScene map. Basically your attribute value can become the extrusion, you often need to normalize data.


4

The CartoDB code is available on GitHub and you can run it on your own server but if that's what you want or need you should really look at the enterprise options Radek mentioned. If you absolutely must host it yourself you will need a specific version of Ubuntu and very specific versions of Ruby, Python, Node, Postgres and GIS libraries. It's a huge ...


3

pseudocode for your problem would be: for point1 in csv: for point2 in csv: distance = haversine(point1, point2) where haversine is defined as (from e.g. http://gis.stackexchange.com/a/56589/15183) : def haversine(lon1, lat1, lon2, lat2): """ Calculate the great circle distance between two points on the earth (specified in decimal ...


2

I came across this same problem, I think.... If I understand it right you had two (or more) datasets and you need to get the dataset scale ranges to match so that comparisons can be made. I solved it by: Create you're first dataset as you want it to appear. Ideally with the largest data range just so that symbols can be copied over easier to the second ...


2

One presumes you are already familiar with Section508.gov but those who may find this later may not be. For general accessibility resources see The Accessibility Project although that is primarily focused on web accessibility. For more cartographic specific accessibility tests consider the Colour Contrast Analyser and Vischeck.


2

CartoDB is primarly offered as SAAS (Software as a Service) and their basic offerings are hosted. This means that if you have any of these accounts: http://cartodb.com/pricing/ then you cannot host it on your own server. However if you'd purchase Enterprise edition http://cartodb.com/enterprise/, then it is possible to host CartoDB on your own machine. This ...


1

in GRASS you can do that (extract rivers) from a DEM (which gives you informations only regarding "height" of the single pixel - there are not rivers "included" in this kind of information). You can use GRASS by Qgis too (there is a useful GRASS plugin) and the tool to extract rivers is called "r.watershed". As rightly @underdark said, you need to decide ...


1

If you want to create a map, forget GRASS and use QGIS instead. Load both the rivers and the elevation data. Double-click on the layer names and go to the Style section to change the colors and you are all set.


1

You can try free and open OpenStreetMap data. For NYC-data in various formats see this link: http://download.geofabrik.de/north-america/us/new-york.html. However, keep in mind that OSM data is gathered by thousands of volunteers around the world and there is no guarantee of completeness and thematic accuracy but the data is very good for larger and populous ...


1

Try the following steps: Highlight layer in the Layers table of contents (TOC), then using the Select Features tool select only the features you want to convert Next, right click layer name in TOC and select Save Selection As and define the format drop down to AutoCAD DXF Repeat steps 1 and 2 for all other layers


1

As far as I can tell, you'll need to just zoom in on the selected area and print it, assuming you're using the Print Task found here: https://developers.arcgis.com/javascript/jsapi/printtask-amd.html. It doesn't look like there's an option to print only part of what's visible. Note: The PrintTask requires an ArcGIS Server 10.1 Export Web Map Task. So make ...



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