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(1) I have usually heard of it referred to as a "Hexagonal Map" or "Hexagonal Grid Map". Both queries turn up a lot of relevant results in Google. Example Link Here: http://anitagraser.com/2012/03/04/mapping-density-with-hexagonal-grids/ The link above also outlines the process that you would use in QGIS. If you want to do it in ArcGIS. This article ...


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Figure 1 is the inset map. An inset is always smaller than the primary map. Inset refers (somewhat obliquely) to a position within the page layout. It is typically completely within (ie set within = inset) the primary map, however it can be partially overlapping or completely outside but still on the same page/layout. If it were on another page/layout (ie, ...


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I suppose FIG.1 is the inset map. FIG.2 is simply a map. Based on ESRI GIS Dictionary,an inset map is: A small map set within a larger map. An inset map might show a detailed part of the map at a larger scale, or the extent of the existing map drawn at a smaller scale within the context of a larger area. According to this definition inset map is the map ...


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No, it does not aggregate adjacent enumeration areas (polygons) into a single dot. If there's a dot to show, it's shown, and if the symbol size is too large or value count too low then the dots will simply overlap/coalesce (potentially leading to a solid polygon shape of the dot color). For areas that don't meet the minimum value, no dot is shown and the ...


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I like to use the .emf format--it is a vector format, so you can resize without any issues with pixelation as you sometimes get with raster formats like png and jpg.


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Something that I use often is to add a gradient background to the bubble circles in the legend: <div class='cartodb-legend bubble'> <ul> <li> 1.46 </li> <li class="graph" style="background: linear-gradient(to right,rgb(253, 141, 60), rgb(252, 78, 42), rgb(177, 0, 38));"> <div class="bubbles"></div> ...


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This is also called "binning", which when applied to hexagon polygons, is referred to as "hexagonal binning" or simply "hex binning". There is a top-notch blog article (Binning in GIS) at GIS Lounge on the subject, which points to an Esri blog that explains how to create the maps in ArcGIS Using a binning technique for point-based multiscale web maps ...


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"Used digitally" is pretty broad, and depending on how they will be used or distributed might make a significant difference. As would the data type (vector or raster) shown in the map. For this answer, since your question title explicitly says PowerPoint and your body mentions that, that's what I'll address. The first thing to determine is whether what ...


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Personally, I use pdf for all maps that will be used digitally. They have the ability to be zoomed in and navigated without losing resolution. There is also a geographic element in Adobe Reader that allows you to display the different layers and information about those layers in a sidebar if needed. I don't know of any general rules, however.


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With some manual work and a Spatial Analyst extension. I assume you have access to Spatial Analyst since you are able to generate contours from DEM? I use a different approach - I show only major contours in areas with slope more that say 30 degrees but it will work the same for thinning contours with some tweaks. Create a slope raster and generalize if ...


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Considering the fact that you are exporting some raster data as well; the best technique, IMHO, is to NOT use the ArcGIS PDF exporter at all but rather export to a high resolution TIFF instead and then convert the tiff using Adobe Acrobat Pro renderer to PDF. (Important note: this only works well with TIFF) You can tweak the rendering options in Adobe if ...



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