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@ChrisW said: As far as I know and can find evidence for, you cannot set a classification range below the minimum value in the data. This got me thinking, and I actually found a way to set the classification range below the minimum value. My original issue was built around the fact that the lowest classification range was required to contain the ...


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I believe this is about feature legend but not rasters. If this is about rasters disregard my suggestion. I usually use these: Merge 2 (or more shapefiles) CHILDS into one, let's call it FAMILY create legend for FAMILY import symbology for every CHILD from FAMILY Hope it helps, FP


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While the classification uses similar ranges, the data don't share a range. I think the solution here is to solve it in the legend and color assignments, and not the actual classification. Start with your lower left result, and convert that legend to a graphic. Edit the text to get the ranges you want. I notice all your other images have a 10 unit range, ...


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The only way I know to do this would be union or intersect all three of your layers to one. If you have an Advanced license this could be done in one step, otherwise you are limited to two inputs at a time. This should create a single layer that looks like the district polygons, but each polygon would have a country and division attribute. The problem is ...


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I may have a solution for you. If flow in one direction is consistently lower than in the other direction, this would work. I think you have much of the answer included in the question. I would attempt to duplicate the layer and draw the limited flow on top of the greater flow and have them both symbolized by the flow value.


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Yes, there is a Flicker group. See also, the Screenshots page on the QGIS.org site for latest samples of maps. Not sure about the Chugach State Park map. Generally, the splash screen map is of a specific area, but not necessarily produced with QGIS.


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I think I know what you're trying to do, because I'm trying the same thing. I've got eight maps I want to create. I want the map title to be whatever layer is visible at the time. All the maps are the same, but only one of the eight layers will be visible. I didn't find an elegant solution but I found a work-around. I basically just hid the stuff I didn't ...


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The Mercator projection, is a conformal map projection so any angles measured on the map are the same as if measured on the globe. It also has the property that all straight lines on the map represent loxodromes, or lines of constant azimuth. Those are useful properties in surveying and navigation. Beyond that, however -- and especially when mapping very ...


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Orthographic projection is able to show the poles, which mercator can not do. Furthermore, the projection looks like the view from outer space, which feels kind of natural. It only shows half of the worlds surface, but that's what you see from outer space. An even more "natural" view would have resulted from a perspective projection, which looks like the ...


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Additional option is to use MapSurfer.NET (C#, VB.NET) framework for styling and rendering maps in raster or vector format. You can fully automate the process of producing maps using the built-in style editor (similar to TileMill) and its functionality, or even use SDK to built your own chain of operations you want to perform. Note, if you really need not ...


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You don't say what scripting language, so I've assumed python. Have you considered the arcpy.mapping module? Another option is the Mapnik library.


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The world.dat file is a file format specifically for GnuPlot. I haven't heard of it in use anywhere else and I couldn't find anything. In a more recent blog post on that same site, the author talks about updating the world.dat file with better data - specifically from Natural Earth. Since the author starts with shape files, this same data flow could be ...


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I have worked with staff and students from ITC am have been impressed with them. I don't know much about the BSc program but I'm fairly sure it's in english.


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I can suggest obtaining a BSc on a remote basis, there is a good programme in Lund (LUMA GIS), Sweden. Another one is offered by University of Gävle (Sweden), you will get Degree of Bachelor of Arts/Science. The program is 3 years long: Study Programme in Computer Science and Geographical Information Technology, 180 cr. You could also search a bit more on ...


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There is an existing ArcGIS Idea titled Circular callout backgrounds to: Add circular text callout backgrounds in addition to the default rectangular box callout backgrounds. If you have not already done so, I recommend that you add your vote to that.


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You definitely need coordinates or to join that data with existing polygons/points. A quick look at your data shows that it is broken down into boroughs or district numbers. My next step would be to join this data in ArcGIs or QGIS (whatever solution you have available to you) to either the boroughs or districts. This will allow you to visualize the ...


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Working from PolyGeo's code, here's what I came up with to work around the problem of having to have an exact number of items and identical order match between lookup values and the description. The full working script is here. # name and path of the lookup table lookup_table = r"..\default.gdb\vegMajorComm_Lookup" # change these to match the relevant ...


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What you're trying to create is known as a bivariate map. There's a couple of ways to do this, but since you've already got raster data that leans toward certain methods. The big thing is going to be your color selections, and I'm not sure exactly how to get the blending you desire. Typically this is done with two colors, one for each variable. So A 0 = ...


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After you export your map to a tiff with world file, you can use the free program OKMap to convert it to a kmz file. You would use the Utilities-MapTiling/Garmin Custom Maps menu option. This file can then be used as a custom map in Garmin GPS units that allow custom maps, such as the 62. We do it all the time with our cruise maps.


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There is a path to making true Garmin .img maps using free tools. It's explained over at GPSFileDepot. The description is for making topos, but you can generalize the steps to make anything you want. Specifically, if you have shapefiles, you can just focus on the few steps involving shapefiles. Be warned, this process is not for the faint of heart. It relies ...


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It does really depend on the project and what type of data you're using (and what you know how to use) but Tom Macwright made this handy simple Map Makers cheat sheet: https://github.com/tmcw/mapmakers-cheatsheet



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