Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

4

I think you may need to process this file yourself - either manually, or by writing a script to automate the extraction. If you rename the file GMRT.kmz to GMRT.zip you can open it in WinZip or similar, and see its contents. This includes the file doc.kml, which contains a number of Links - examining the first link shows a URL: <Link> ...


4

I would consider two options: Get ArcGIS Explorer. It is a lightweight ESRI GIS Viewer and offered for free. Since it is by ESRI, you will get file geodatabase support. I don't have much experience with it, but it should offer the ability to export the data in another format.http://www.esri.com/software/arcgis/explorer Get QGIS, an open source and ...


3

To answer the original question, from here, it states: If you do not have ArcInfo Workstation installed, the Coverage toolbox will not appear in the list of available toolboxes. I understand your confusion - search shows it, but it doesn't open. If you expand the toolbox under System Toolboxes or the ArcToolbox window, you don't see the Coverage ...


2

The ST_Polygonize aggregate in PostGIS will return a geometry_dump containing all possible polygons formed by a set of lines. I'm assuming the block IDs shown in your example are not related to the IDs of input linework. If this is the case, you can get your polygons and IDs with: SELECT (st_dump).path[1] as poly_id, (st_dump).geom FROM (SELECT ...


1

The bbox for osmosis should have the order left - right - top - bottom. Note that West of Greenwich has to be negative. Alternatively, you can write something like --bb left=30. right=34. bottom=53. top=57. to avoid any misunderstanding. See http://wiki.openstreetmap.org/wiki/Osmosis/Detailed_Usage_0.44#--bounding-box_.28--bb.29 EDIT The Map-Writer ...


1

That loads two raster layers in Google Earth. I don't think QGIS (through GDAL) supports reading that KMZ (not a KML) because of it. ogrinfo below can't recognize the geometry, even with the libkml (google) driver. ogrinfo -ro -so GMRT.kmz -al ERROR 1: ERROR Parseing kml Style: No id ERROR 1: ERROR Parseing kml Style: No id INFO: Open of `GMRT.kmz' ...


1

You say that you're open to using FME for this but don't want to run in a Windows environment. Good news, as of FME 2014, FME now runs on a Mac as a "technical preview". With FME, you can bypass many of your intermediate steps and go straight from DWG to Google Earth. I would have open a DWG reader and connect it to a Trimble Sketchup Writer. You can ...


1

Once you coverted the DWG to DXF you should be able to use GDAL/OGR. Note that you have to use DXF version 2000 (http://www.gdal.org/ogr/drv_dxf.html). I have recently used ogr2ogr with the -gcp (ground control point) option (http://www.gdal.org/ogr2ogr.html) successfully to geolocate DXFs. Thus, with ogr2ogr you can covert the DXF to Shapefile and ...


1

Converting OSM to PBF is probably not necessary, most tools that can read PBFs can also read OSM XML. If you do need to read the file with osmosis, the issue here is that ogr2osm by default generates files that can be loaded in JOSM and merged with existing OSM data. These files have no timestamp or version attributes as well as having negative IDs, while ...


1

About the DB sizes and Excel import failures: Trying to import the file in XLSX fails after a while. In production we have monitoring services that will kill imports taking too much and/or going out of memory. Importing from Excel is terrible because the internal format forces you to read the whole file into memory before being able to export in CSV (we ...


1

Have you tried doing a PostgreSQL VACUUM? Usually with that you will regain some space, as for performance CartoDB's Postgres does not automatically perform it after actions like column type change*. Importing from XLSX is the same as importing from CSV (in fact, we convert first to CSV and then import), so column types are lost. Other formats like ...


1

If your comfortable on the command line cs2cs is a great way to convert coordinates. You can specify the coordinate system to convert to in from in multiple format, but epsg codes are convenient. To find the EPSG code for your coordinate system of interest look on spatialreference.org, for example see the page for UTM zone 35n. cs2cs +init=epsg:32631 +to ...


1

I created a tiny makefile that might help you install wgrib2 ; get data (you need to add code for your specific data-source) ; convert to csv using @Aragon suggestion ; extract only data using awk (update to your need). Usage First, update the gribFile, csvFile, csvFilteredFile variables to your need. make extract-data Running the extract-data will ...


1

http://support.esri.com/em/knowledgebase/techarticles/detail/41763 For ArcGIS 10.1+ from arcpy import da import os inTable = arcpy.GetParameterAsText(0) fileLocation = arcpy.GetParameterAsText(1) with da.SearchCursor(inTable,['DATA','ATT_NAME']) as cursor: for row in cursor: binaryRep = row[0] fileName = row[1] # save to disk ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible