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-1

I solved this problem with Java + Ibatis implementing the interface TypeHandlerCallback. You need to add postgis.jar lib; Create a handle class implement TypeHandlerCallback from Ibatis;


4

When you read the CSV file into a Qgis layer, you can iterate over the features and apply some processing like this: # path to CSV file filename = 'e:/gps2geometry.csv' # connection string for CSV file reader, \t: separated by tabs uri = 'file:///%s?crs=%s&delimiter=%s&xField=%s&yField=%s&decimal=%s' % (filename, 'EPSG:4326', '\t', 'X', ...


3

You can copy the gps data to an excel-file (or any othe similar program). It will look samething like this: ID A B 1 Lat Long 2 50.123 7.123 3 50.321 7.321 If it only contains the lat/long in one column ("51.123N7.123E") you have to devide that value to two columns. Than you insert a new column C with the header "wkt" (=well known text) and in ...


0

There is the paper "Transformations between NAD83 (2011) and WGS84 (G1674)" from the US NGS detailing the process of converting NAD83 data to WGS84 data.


1

If you use QGIS, download the plug-in named MMQGIS. There's is an option to Google Maps KML export. It is quite simple.


6

Short answer is yes. You need to convert from your coordinates' native reference frame to the NAD83 realization's reference frame, then possibly add an adjustment. In the case of NAD83(CSRS), which I use, there are 3 steps: Native RF -> ITRF96(1997.0) ITRF96 (1997.0) -> NAD83(CSRS) Grid shift Steps 1 and 2 require the Helmert transformation. Step 3 uses ...


2

If you have TransCAD, you can use the Caliper Python module that lets you access TransCAD and it's programming language GISDK via a program written in Python. With it, you can write a Python program like the one below: import sys, traceback, caliper dk = caliper.Gisdk("TransCAD") rh = dk.GetFirstRecord(view_set) for row in ...


2

Oh well, answering my own question again; hoping someone else finds it useful! Using Windows Powershell, the below. Place the source images (jpeg image files in my example) in directory foo, the create the outputdir directory. Then execute this command: dir -recurse -include *.jpeg | %{convert $._FullName -crop 50x50@ +repage +adjoin ...


2

The *.osm file is a *.xml file. There is no need to convert it. Open the file within an editor of your choice and you will see the xml structure. If your application needs a file with *.xml ending simply rename it or use the *.osm file as an input. Both should be fine.


0

From within ArcMap you can manually save your map view to Tiff, Bmp, Pdf, etc. File, Export Map, Save as type.


0

The answer to the question is there's no need to convert the data to a bitmap format at run time. You can pass the data obtained by the RasterIO function to your opencv functions. This question is for when I worked in a company as an apprentice. The time when I didn't know anything about GDAL. So I've asked the question generally and it did not receive much ...


1

I don't use libgeotiff directly, but use GDAL which uses libgeotiff under the hood, but you should be able to find the pixel dimensions using the ModelPixelScaleTag OR extract them from the ModelTransformationTag. See the documentation for more info. You'll need to determine whether the raster is projected and what the horizontal units are (i.e metres, ...


1

How big are the pixels on a side? This seems like a simple calculation if you know the number of pixels and their size i.e. A single 30m pixel (on each side) = 900 Square Meters = 0.2223945 acres (1 square meter = 0.000247105 acres). Am I misunderstanding something? Try using the gdalinfo command to determine cell size and projection information.


4

You can render your data from PostgreSQL directly. Documentation here. PostgreSQL layer example: LAYER NAME "province" STATUS ON TYPE POLYGON CONNECTIONTYPE POSTGIS CONNECTION "host=127.0.0.1 port=5432 dbname=xyz user=postgres password=postgres" DATA "the_geom from xyz" CLASS STYLE COLOR 128 128 128 ANTIALIAS true END ...



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