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10

There are thousands of coordinate systems so it can be hard to tell which one is being used by just looking at the number of digits. However, 6-7 digits looks a lot like UTM coordinates, which are very widely used. In your example that is the case, indeed. You can find this out by looking closely at the following line: <gmlLineString ...


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You should be able to do this in ArcGIS Pro 1.0 by using the ANALYSIS tab to click the Tools button and open the Geoprocessing pane to find and load the Define Projection tool: This tool overwrites the coordinate system information (map projection and datum) stored with a dataset. The only use for this tool is for datsets that have an unknown or ...


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Use the rgdal package. If the shapefiles have a projection defined rgdal::readOGR() is recommended. This package provides bindings to the GDAL library (Geospatial Data Abstraction Library) and access to projection/transformation operations from the PROJ.4 library. This supersedes the shapefile read/write functionality in maptools.


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You do not need to transform the points. The projection applies to the location, not to the attributes (which could be in knots, or ms-1, or nothing to do with any units, like the colour of the soil). The only potential case where this could be a problem is where the target CRS is rotated from the source CRS. Then you'd may need to project u and v into the ...


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Have you tried looking at a software package like pix4dmapper? There is a free trial available with a fair amount of functionality called pix4dmapper discovery: https://pix4d.com/download/ I use this software a lot for mosaicing UAV acquired imagery and it may be worth your while to give it a shot. For images without georeferencing, you could look at ...


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The conditions that you describe would be a special case of the usual problem (slightly more simple because some of the parameter are known), but it will not remove the distortions of the image itself (in a ideal case, central projection, note the larger angle yield larger distortions). If you want to create mosaics the fast way, you could also assume that ...


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This sounds like an image registration followed by a mosaicing procedure to me. There are a few ways but here's 2 that I'll do: 1) Use Ground control points (same location across different photos) and then link them together. This linking can be done in a GIS software or MATLAB(imregister). This is somewhat a manual approach of doing things. 2) Use an ...


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I created a fork of your JSFiddle that implements what I've suggested in my comment: http://jsfiddle.net/jLndtt8z/. The key piece of information you were missing is that the axisOrientation property of the projection is just a hint to format parsers and serializers, but it does not actually cause any coordinates to be transformed. To flip the y-axis, you ...


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This is standardized ;-) See this explanation in German: http://www.lgn.niedersachsen.de/download/71484/Massgeschneiderte_EPSG-Codes_fuer_GIS-Anwendungen.pdf The official code for UTM 32N is EPSG:25832 +proj=utm +zone=32 +ellps=GRS80 +towgs84=0,0,0,0,0,0,0 +units=m +no_defs The German Surveying authorities have requested special EPSG codes with the ...


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Maybe you don't have to redigitize your points. Once you are able to reference your png you can also transform the points you digitized so far. First you have to check, which projection your png file resembles. Depending on the projection that had been used to produce your png ireland could look quite differently. Next thing you need are at least two pairs ...


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@Michael is guiding you to the right directions. To extend his answer, The coordinate system of online maps such as Google Maps are Web Mercator. ArcGIS fully supports this coordinate system. Exact name in ArcGIS is: "WGS 1984 Web Mercator (Auxiliary Sphere)" To convert from WGS84 to this coordniate system, there is valid transformation in ArcGIS for ...


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Given the definition of the MGRS from wikipedia we know that your example 4QFJ123678 can be split up as follows: 4Q is the Grid Zone (columns in a range of 1-60 and rows in the range C-X omitting I and O). As rows increase go further east, as columns increase go further North. FJ is the Grid Square (columns in the range A-Z and rows range A-V, both ...


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See Georeferencing Topo Sheets and Scanned Maps.


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Up to now, the EPSG database has no CRS for Cyprus. There is an open ticket for it since November 2014 EPSG::2014.091. The code you mention is from ESRI, and according to http://help.arcgis.com/en/arcims/10.0/mainhelp/mergedProjects/ArcXMLGuide/elements/pcs.htm#102319 the values are: PROJCS["CGRS_1993_LTM", GEOGCS["GCS_CGRS_1993", ...


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I realized I needed to set the coordinate system of shp to WGS84, then write out to a new file and specify the local coordinate system - then add that layer to the map and buffer it. Worked! Here is my updated code: from qgis.core import * from qgis.analysis import * from PyQt4.QtCore import * from PyQt4.QtGui import QInputDialog from qgis.utils import ...


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You don't have a problem. Using decimal degrees is tantamount to computing in a Plate Carree projection, which distorts distances (and areas) greatly at points away from the Equator. However, within any 3000 m region the change in distortion is inconsequential (unless that region is extremely close to one of the poles). Suppose, then, that the area of any ...


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Start a new, blank map or in your current map go to step 2. Double-click or right-click > properties on the dataframe (named Layers by default) in the Table of Contents (ToC). Go to the Coordinate System Tab, drill down through folder tree to Projected Coordinate Systems > UTM > Europe > European Datum 1950 UTM Zone 31N and highlight it, then click Ok. ...


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Google Maps Engine works with WGS84 EPSG-Code 4326, so you'll need to project the shapefile into the correct projection. ArcGIS: http://help.arcgis.com/en/arcgisdesktop/10.0/help/index.html#//00170000007m000000 QGIS: http://docs.qgis.org/2.2/de/docs/training_manual/vector_analysis/reproject_transform.html?highlight=transformation


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Have you heard of OpenDroneMap? I was at the FOSS4GNA 2015 Conference and saw a very impressive session regarding the tool. From the Session: OpenDroneMap is fully Open Source postprocessing tool for highly overlapping unreferenced imagery, turning the unstructured data (simple photos) into structured data: colorized point clouds, digital surface models, ...


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If all you are looking to do is stitch your images together and save them off to a single image, then Irfanview (excellent freeware image mgr) does that. Go to Image > Create Panorama Image... and set up your grid. Apologies if I am over-simplifying your issue, but it seems a straight image manipulation thing, rather than a GIS thing.



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