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2

See my solution for QGIS: Export your projects to shape, and load them to qgis. If you want to use meter for your buffer distances, you have to transform your layer to meter coordinate system. The Best would be the local (country-national) coordinate systems. So save as your layers again to shape but in the CRS section choose selected CRS and load your new ...


2

Unless you really need ~millimeter accuracy you do not need a custom local system. Just use the appropriate UTM zone. UTM is metric and projected, so you will get proper distances. You can find some examples for calculating the distortion from going away from the central meridian of an UTM zone. You can keep your source data as WGS84 but be aware that at ...


1

I guess your data have lat/long coordinates ("Geographic coordinate systems" in ArcGis), so that coordinates are stored in degrees (e.g. decimal degrees). For this kind of analysis I think the use of a "Projected coordinate systems" is recommended. You can refer to the following image (Wikipedia) to find the UTM zone where your project data belongs: ...


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This is my command (for PostgreSQL): ogr2ogr -a_srs epsg:4326 -f "PostgreSQL" PG:"dbname=world_borders host=localhost user=zeito password=my_password port=5432" CCPP_CAPITAL.shp and it works nicely. See how is the SRS definition.


2

It seems the first dataset (vista_nicosia_links.shp) is using a different projection, most likely UTM (the zone depending on your data's location - for Nicosia, it is most likely UTM Zone 36 North). To match the coordinates properly, you have to correctly determine and define the shapefile's coordinate system (using Define Projection or changing the ...


0

The formula for calculating grid convergence (sometimes called meridian convergence) for spherical UTM projections was given (very incorrectly until just now) at How to Calculate North? In case that is not clear γ = arctan [tan (λ - λ0) × sin φ] where γ is grid convergence, λ0 is longitude of UTM zone's central ...


2

So I got it to work finally. The image was read only so I couldn't define spatial reference. Having fixed that the only work to be done with the available image was to define its coordinates and projection. So had to create a custom coordinate system with GCS Moon 2000 and Mercator projection (sphere). And voila no need for tedious georeference or Project ...


0

In QGIS 2.8 it is possible to load it with Add Delimited Text Layer and check the DMS Coordinates checkbox next to the X field and Y field combo boxes.


3

According to the metadata on the data's source webpage, there are latitude and longitude values for the image which means you need to georeference it (if it isn't already) using those values. For the longitude values, I would switch to a +/-180 range, rather than a 0 to 360 range. So for the upper left longitude of 332.26, I would use -27.74 instead. ...


2

As AndreJ assumed, I'm believe you meant EPSG::32632, WGS 1984 / UTM Zone 32 North. It's a projected coordinate reference system and its unit of measure is the meter, not decimal degrees. If your lat/lon coordinates fall within that zone, the values should range between: Easting: 200 km to 800 km Northing: 0 km to 10000 km


2

International 1924 is an ellipsoid (spheroid, in ArcGIS), not a true geodetic datum nor geographic coordinate reference system. EPSG has defined many geographic coordinate reference systems that are based on an ellipsoid, rather than on a true datum. This was done for data where the datum is not known but the ellipsoid is. If you know that a dataset is ...


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Some people use rotated spheres as a basis for further mapping. I turned up a blog post about the capabilities of D3 here with has examples and here's another page about the some of the math behind it, although from a graphics perspective. For earth solutions, usually a sphere is rotated rather than an ellipsoid because of the simpler mathematics. Not ...


-2

I'm not sure if 'EPSG:36232' exists, but if does it is most likely to produce incorrect outputs. I'd advice you to use 'ESPG:4326' and transform it to 'EPSG:3857'.


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EPSG 36232 is not a valid EPSG code: http://epsg.io/?q=36232 Why not just use EPSG:4326 if you want WGS 84.


2

Because the Earth is not a sphere, measuring the latitude from the equator plane is the only way to have circular parallels. Therefore I think that any geographic coordinate system that would not use the equator plane as a reference would have more disadvantages than advantages. If you need a specific coordinate system, I would therefore rather suggest ...


1

It turns out the Centroid(X) and Centroid(Y) in MapInfo are not the line centre point coordinates in BNG. (However to get around the rounding problem I exported the table as a DBF). Instead, I generated these in ArcGIS instead and got perfect results. I achieved my desired result by calculating differences in X and Y values between subsections and taking the ...


0

A shapefile should usually have a .prj file with the projection information. For GDA94, there are different projections available: EPSG:3577 Australian Albers EPSG:3112 Geoscience Australia Lambert EPSG:3308 NSW Lambert EPSG:3107 SA Lambert EPSG:3111 Vicgrid94 EPSG:3113 BCSG02 and GDA94/MGA zone 48 to 58. From those, zone 55 should be the best choice. ...


2

The coordinate system might be EPSG:2412 Beijing 1954 / 3-degree Gauss-Kruger zone 36 with the Proj.4 definition +proj=tmerc +lat_0=0 +lon_0=108 +k=1 +x_0=36500000 +y_0=0 +ellps=krass +towgs84=15.8,-154.4,-82.3,0,0,0,0 +units=m +no_defs You can use that in GDAL ogr2ogr or cs2cs, or within the QGIS GUI to display the data, and convert to any other CRS. ...


3

Yes. Double-click the dataframe name in the Table of Contents, or right-click it and choose Properties. On the Coordinate System tab, at the bottom, click the Transformations button. This will bring up the same dialog as when you add the layers. Here you can select the CRS of the layers present in the top box, the CRS you want to specify them to (your ...


4

When geographic coordinates are plotted "without projection", they are really being projected via the Simple Cylindrical (aka, Equirectangular, or Plate Carrée) projection. (It goes by many different names.) Geographic coordinates, as latitudes and longitudes, are said to be unprojected because they define positions on a (curved) sphere or ellipsoid – ...


0

The GeometryEngine.project() method is the right method, you just need to ensure your output spatial reference is correct. SpatialReference srFrom = SpatialReference.create(3857) // WGS84 SpatialReference srTo = SpatialReference.create(3168) // Kertau_RSO_RSO_Malaya // convert point Point convertedPoint = GeometryEngine.project(point, srFrom, srTo); A ...


0

You will use GDAL to do this from the GDAL command line or OSGeo4W shell. The syntax for inspecting a raster file is: gdalinfo C:\path\to\raster For more advanced use, if you are using Python/C# bindings to do this then you can deserialize the the output into a dict or object.


3

EPSG:9806 is the transformation method called Cassini-Soldner, but this is not the kind of EPSG code that includes the transformation parameters which are necessary for QGIS. Usually, shapefile datasets include a .prj file with the CRS information. If you do not have it, you might go back to the place where you got the data from and look for further ...


2

You can use the Proj4 converter: http://trac.osgeo.org/proj/ Yes, it is a converter but you can convert bulk coordinates. Create a simple text file (let's say sweref99.txt) with the coordinates, e.g. 606905.22 6970515.93 635765.54 7223101.41 In order to convert all coordinates from this file the command is like this: cs2cs +init=epsg:3006 +no_defs +to ...


4

The first (WGS 1984 UTM 33 North) has map units of meters, while the second has decimal degrees. If you're talking about a two-dimensional display, the WGS 1984 (decimal degree) data is often displayed using a "pseudo-Plate Carrée" projection. That is, the decimal degrees are treated as if they're linear units and the features are just displayed. A standard ...


0

Thank you very much for your answer, Gabor. I tried applying the code you mentioned, but I can not make it work. This is the javascript code that I have created: proj4.defs('EPSG:1000', "+proj=lcc +lat_1=14.25 +lat_2=13.3166667 +lat_0=13.783333333333333 +lon_0=-89 +x_0=500000.00004 +y_0=295809.17715 +k_0=0.999967040229754 +a=6378206 +rf=294.9786982138982 ...


1

After you have added the shapefile, take a look at Rightclick -> SET CRS for Layer. The layer CRS should be either EPSG:102711, or a custom CRS with these parameters: +proj=tmerc +lat_0=38.83333333333334 +lon_0=-74.5 +k=0.9999 +x_0=150000 +y_0=0 +datum=NAD83 +units=us-ft +no_defs You can enable on-the-fly-reprojection, set the project CRS to EPSG:3857, ...


6

As @minus34 said above, you almost certainly have latitude and longitude, rather than eastings and northings, so your projection is likely to be WGS84 (or because you're in Australia, GDA94). To do the transformation in pyproj (assuming GDA 94) you can use: import pyproj latitude, longitude = -33.75, 150.0 gda94 = pyproj.Proj(init='epsg:4283') mgaz56 = ...


0

It should be the problem that @Jake mentioned. When adding a CSV layer you are creating a temporary layer which do not alter the default on-the-fly CRS (i.e. WGS-84). When adding the shapefile with a different CRS, you do however alter the on-the-fly CRS to NAD1983, which shift and/or distort your original temporary data. Two things you may do: Export ...


2

One way is to use the Define Projection Tool in ArcToolbox (or the raster's property page in ArcCatalog). I would pick a related projected coordinate system as a start point. Browse to Projected Coordinate Systems, Continental, Africa and choose Africa Albers Equal Area Conic. Right-click and choose Copy and Modify I would change the PCS name. Update the ...


0

Summing up the discussion above: While Winkel Tripel projection is defined in the proj library and can be called from the command line, it can't be used as a custom CRS in QGIS because there's no inverse transformation in the proj library. The enhancement request to add this functionality has been closed since it seems that the inverse transformation ...


0

You can define any projection with a valid Proj4 definition in OpenLayers. OpenLayers 3 can use Proj4JS version 2.2+. First, you have to define the custom projection with Proj4JS: proj4.defs("NAMEFORMYCUSTOMPROJ", "+proj=lcc +lat_1=14.25 +lat_2=13.3166667 +lat_0=13.783333333333333" + "+lon_0=-89 +x_0=500000.00004 +y_0=295809.17715 +k_0=0.999967040229754 ...


0

It seems you've a problem with the coordinate system. Now you've the same CS for both layers but probably one of them has the wrong one. You should try to check this first, then, if this is the error, you need to define the right projection before reproject for the system you want. If this is not the error, as the shift position is consistent, you can fix ...


1

I tried your dataset and: Open the Shapefile with QGIS Set CRS of the layer to "SAD 69 / UTM zone 23 S EPSG 29193" Save layer as Shapefile, with projection "WGS 84 EPSG 4326". After this, we're requested for the datum, choose: "+towgs84=-66..87,4.37,-38.52" It works! :)


0

As for other methods there is one called GeographicLib written in C++ and with bindings to Python. Says it does some geodesic conversions including UTM, but have yet to try it out for myself. Link: https://pypi.python.org/pypi/geographiclib/1.34 I would note however, that installing PyProj for Windows should be easy if you use the binary installers from ...



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