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SQL Server Spatial Tools is a CLR assembly that you can add to your database to assist with a number of operations that didn't come built in with the original release of SQL Server spatial objects. It has a set of functions to do similar operations as those found in Oracles SDO_CS. There is a projection example in the source code section, though it doesn't ...


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My initial thought is that your project settings are not in the correct coordinate system, regardless of the layer settings. I would start a blank project and only import a single layer and that is already set at the Hartebeeshoek94 projection. I'm not sure if QGIS takes the projection of the first layer, so maybe right click the layer and choose 'Set ...


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GR refers to the Grid Reference, it's like a lat long intersection. Eastings are grid lines that akin to longitude(lines that increase towards the East) and Northings are like latitude (lines that increase towards the North). The intersection of the two is known as the GR or grid reference.


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Yes. The Coordinates window in the Display ribbon lets you choose common grids like D.d, DMS, UTM, as well as all other projected grids found in Esri platforms. At second glance, it appears as though all these grids get an on-the-fly projection to fit the base system (probably a WGS84/Psuedo Mercator), so while basemap stays the same, the coordinates and ...


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The best thing is to keep things simple. Most of all tile provider use 3857 and the simple way is to publish wms also in 3857. For wms server like geoserver is not big deal, he will give you wms in every projection you want.


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The integrized grid is sparse, in a sense it is a ragged array. Looks like the sinusoidal one really is a full array, albeit with empty tiles. The integrized sinusoidal grid is still used by the ocean colour group for L3BIN MODIS (and VIIRS, SeaWiFS, CZCS etc), recently converted from HDF4 to NetCDF4 (as compound types within groups) fwiw. The bins are ...


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I solved by using conversion functions from proj4js.js


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For proj.4 those two mean exactly the same and conversion from one system to another changes only the EPSG code. If you work with geodetic problems which require accurate ellipsoid model you will need some other tools. # ETRS89 <4258> +proj=longlat +ellps=GRS80 +towgs84=0,0,0,0,0,0,0 +no_defs <> # WGS 84 <4326> +proj=longlat +datum=WGS84 ...


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Doing an ncdump on the data from one of the soest files gives this chunk of metadata for the precipitation flux variable: double pratesfc(time, latitude, longitude) ; pratesfc:_FillValue = -999000000. ; pratesfc:colorBarMaximum = 0.005f ; pratesfc:colorBarMinimum = 0.f ; pratesfc:coordinates = "time_run ...


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Do read the Leaflet tutorial on using WMS - it specifically addresses how to use WMS services in other projections. Also note that you can not have raster layers in different CRSs in Leaflet. It's simply not supported due to the complexity of on-the-fly raster reprojection.


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If you want to change the CRS of the raster, use Raster -> Projections -> Warp(Reproject), choosing a different filename and WGS84 EPSG:4326 as target SRS. DO NOT use Set Layer CRS for this task, it will corrupt your data. To avoid future mistakes, remove the original layer from the canvas, and set the project CRS to WGS84 as well. With the raster ...


3

You should not have to do any particular conversion on your OSM data or Leaflet returned coordinates. There is a high confusion on this subject, but I think it comes down to a simple explanation: OSM data is in WGS84 datum (EPSG 4326). This is how you plot the Earth onto an ellipsoid. Web Mercator (EPSG 3857) is how you project this ellipsoid onto a plane....


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sr.ImportFromEPSG() You have the S and P transposed. For the record, I don't see an entry for EPSG::29613 so that code may be invalid or deprecated. http://epsg.io/?q=29613


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I like JB's answer above but will add two things. If the point locations are for a 'general overview' map then it might suffice to simply pan to each area where the site is located and create a point. At a large scale one point might cover an entire city or town as a visual representation. In that case the exact coordinates are not important at relatively ...


0

I would separate the data into the various coordinate systems first and try to standardize the data in each as much as possible. Create a separate file for each coordinate system. If the data is in a spreadsheet, have a separate sheet for each coordinate system. Then you can use a single sheet to create a layer (shapefile or feature class) for each that is ...


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I usualy search for proper coordinate systems in the web "epsg.io". You can search "Ireland" in that web and you obtain several results. Maybe "IRENET95 / UTM zone 29N" match your needs but I'm not sure because I've never worked with Irish data


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Alternatively to your solution (which seems to work in ARCGIS), you can set up an oblique mercaor projection. This would work in QGIS and GDAL-based software as well: PROJ.4 : +proj=omerc +lat_0=55.102476 +lonc=1.42624 +alpha=-43.22 +k=0 +x_0=0 +y_0=0 +gamma=0 +datum=WGS84 +towgs84=0,0,0,0,0,0,0 +units=m +no_defs OGC WKT : PROJCS["unnamed", GEOGCS["WGS ...


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You probably want to do this: select ST_Intersection( ST_Transform( ST_SetSRID(ST_GeomFromText('POLYGON(( 200000 2900000,250000 3500000,300000 2960000,200000 2967400,200000 2900000))'),96703),4326), ST_Transform(geom, 4326)) from polygon_folder; But, I am quite sure (from Finding all polygons inside of a polygon) that ST_Intersection ...


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It is a pure Python problem With shapely, your 3D point is represented by pt3D = Point(11.52951677300007,0.7729100360000416, -50000) list(pt3D.coords) [(11.52951677300007, 0.7729100360000416, -50000.0)] Using slicing for example (there are others solutions) pt2D = Point(list(pt3D.coords)[0][:2]) print pt2D POINT (11.52951677300007 0.7729100360000416) ...


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I think you have a rather uncommon form of 1m-resolution OS grid coordinates. Here is my interpretation: The first letter, the T, represents a 500km by 500km square in SE England. The second letter, the Q, represents a 100km by 100km square within that (approx. London and and Sussex). The next two digits, the 38, represents a 10km by 10km square within ...


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I just use the wrong coordinate system. The right is UTM 32N!


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Try making adding a new field with a long int as the data type. Right click on the new field and select Calculate Geometry Choose the option (length in meters) select a segment and use the measure tool to make sure it is the same length as it shows in the attribute table.



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