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The GeometryEngine.project() method is the right method, you just need to ensure your output spatial reference is correct. SpatialReference srFrom = SpatialReference.create(3857) // WGS84 SpatialReference srTo = SpatialReference.create(3168) // Kertau_RSO_RSO_Malaya // convert point Point convertedPoint = GeometryEngine.project(point, srFrom, srTo); A ...


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You will use GDAL to do this from the GDAL command line or OSGeo4W shell. The syntax for inspecting a raster file is: gdalinfo C:\path\to\raster For more advanced use, if you are using Python/C# bindings to do this then you can deserialize the the output into a dict or object.


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EPSG:9806 is the transformation method called Cassini-Soldner, but this is not the kind of EPSG code that includes the transformation parameters which are necessary for QGIS. Usually, shapefile datasets include a .prj file with the CRS information. If you do not have it, you might go back to the place where you got the data from and look for further ...


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You can use the Proj4 converter: http://trac.osgeo.org/proj/ Yes, it is a converter but you can convert bulk coordinates. Create a simple text file (let's say sweref99.txt) with the coordinates, e.g. 606905.22 6970515.93 635765.54 7223101.41 In order to convert all coordinates from this file the command is like this: cs2cs +init=epsg:3006 +no_defs +to ...


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The first (WGS 1984 UTM 33 North) has map units of meters, while the second has decimal degrees. If you're talking about a two-dimensional display, the WGS 1984 (decimal degree) data is often displayed using a "pseudo-Plate Carrée" projection. That is, the decimal degrees are treated as if they're linear units and the features are just displayed. A standard ...


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Thank you very much for your answer, Gabor. I tried applying the code you mentioned, but I can not make it work. This is the javascript code that I have created: proj4.defs('EPSG:1000', "+proj=lcc +lat_1=14.25 +lat_2=13.3166667 +lat_0=13.783333333333333 +lon_0=-89 +x_0=500000.00004 +y_0=295809.17715 +k_0=0.999967040229754 +a=6378206 +rf=294.9786982138982 ...


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After you have added the shapefile, take a look at Rightclick -> SET CRS for Layer. The layer CRS should be either EPSG:102711, or a custom CRS with these parameters: +proj=tmerc +lat_0=38.83333333333334 +lon_0=-74.5 +k=0.9999 +x_0=150000 +y_0=0 +datum=NAD83 +units=us-ft +no_defs You can enable on-the-fly-reprojection, set the project CRS to EPSG:3857, ...


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As @minus34 said above, you almost certainly have latitude and longitude, rather than eastings and northings, so your projection is likely to be WGS84 (or because you're in Australia, GDA94). To do the transformation in pyproj (assuming GDA 94) you can use: import pyproj latitude, longitude = -33.75, 150.0 gda94 = pyproj.Proj(init='epsg:4283') mgaz56 = ...


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It should be the problem that @Jake mentioned. When adding a CSV layer you are creating a temporary layer which do not alter the default on-the-fly CRS (i.e. WGS-84). When adding the shapefile with a different CRS, you do however alter the on-the-fly CRS to NAD1983, which shift and/or distort your original temporary data. Two things you may do: Export ...


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One way is to use the Define Projection Tool in ArcToolbox (or the raster's property page in ArcCatalog). I would pick a related projected coordinate system as a start point. Browse to Projected Coordinate Systems, Continental, Africa and choose Africa Albers Equal Area Conic. Right-click and choose Copy and Modify I would change the PCS name. Update the ...


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Summing up the discussion above: While Winkel Tripel projection is defined in the proj library and can be called from the command line, it can't be used as a custom CRS in QGIS because there's no inverse transformation in the proj library. The enhancement request to add this functionality has been closed since it seems that the inverse transformation ...


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You can define any projection with a valid Proj4 definition in OpenLayers. OpenLayers 3 can use Proj4JS version 2.2+. First, you have to define the custom projection with Proj4JS: proj4.defs("NAMEFORMYCUSTOMPROJ", "+proj=lcc +lat_1=14.25 +lat_2=13.3166667 +lat_0=13.783333333333333" + "+lon_0=-89 +x_0=500000.00004 +y_0=295809.17715 +k_0=0.999967040229754 ...


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It seems you've a problem with the coordinate system. Now you've the same CS for both layers but probably one of them has the wrong one. You should try to check this first, then, if this is the error, you need to define the right projection before reproject for the system you want. If this is not the error, as the shift position is consistent, you can fix ...


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I tried your dataset and: Open the Shapefile with QGIS Set CRS of the layer to "SAD 69 / UTM zone 23 S EPSG 29193" Save layer as Shapefile, with projection "WGS 84 EPSG 4326". After this, we're requested for the datum, choose: "+towgs84=-66..87,4.37,-38.52" It works! :)


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As for other methods there is one called GeographicLib written in C++ and with bindings to Python. Says it does some geodesic conversions including UTM, but have yet to try it out for myself. Link: https://pypi.python.org/pypi/geographiclib/1.34 I would note however, that installing PyProj for Windows should be easy if you use the binary installers from ...


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EDIT - Disclaimer: I would like to refer the readers to the discussion with ChrisW below. It might be that getting an area based upon an OTF CRS is not a bug after all; that is, at least, in arcgis it also being used to allow geoprocessing two layers from different CRS. To elaborate on the issue above. As AndreJ as suggested and show - this is probably a ...


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I can confirm that it seems to be a bug. Create a csv file with the following content: E N 600000 200000 700000 200000 700000 300000 600000 300000 Import it as delimited text with EPSG:21781, enable snapping and draw a polygon shapefile on the four points. Without OTF, the result of $area/1000000.0 is 10000 m² (which is obviously correct). Turning OTF ...


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There is another option than converting in QGIS, which is to add the CRS property to the GeoJSON before uploading to CartoDB, see the GeoJSON spec. This means you need to convert you GeoJSON to a feature collection, which may be of use anyway, if you wish to upload more than one geometry. So, at the start of your GeoJSON, you put the CRS of EPSG:27700 (the ...


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After posting the question I was able to track down a specific article at Geosoft that answers this. Yes, the "Local Datum Transform" is used to convert to WGS84. https://my.geosoft.com/supportcentre?showOverlay=yes&login=ok#kb/kA230000000VFkoCAG See Local Datums


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You have coordinates in DMS (degree minute second) format, and need to get them into DD (decimal degree) to import easily into ArcMap. While in Excel, make a new column. This would be the formula to just convert from DMS to DD: degrees, plus minutes divided by 60, plus seconds divided by 3600. =MID([DMS], 2, 2)+(MID([DMS], 5, 2)/60)+(MID(A6, 8, 4)/3600) ...


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The following ESRI Knowledge Base artcile details the steps to turn your data from Excel into a shapefile. Hopefully you will find this is all you need. http://support.esri.com/en/knowledgebase/techarticles/detail/27589 Note: You will have to convert your coordinates to decimal degrees. Following @Erica's comment, and indeed a re-reading of your ...


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You have to transform the vector layer with a right click on it > "Save as..." You will save a new vector layer (for example "points_21781.shp"). Change the CRS in your 21781, CH1903 / LV03. The new vector layer will have the right CRS.


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You are encountering the difference between a projected coordinate system and a geographic coordinate system. Google Earth reads all coordinates as if they were in Geographic Coordinate System WGS 1984, a.k.a. WGS84. So latitude/longitude coordinates (45.215, -162.6548) will show up correctly (as long as you use the WGS84 datum). Your UTM data, on the ...


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I think I might have a solution. That is if something in your workflow is missing. I have replicated your workflow, but would like to emphasize the following. If this is what you've done, so hopefully the bug report would be useful, otherwise this might help. Note that I have used World_from_space projection, with central meridian set to 0.0, 0.0 ...


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So I finally found the solution to this problem. You have to override the spatialReferences array of the WMSLayer object right before adding it to the map. wmsLayer.spatialReferences[0] = 3857; map.addLayers([wmsLayer]); This worked with a layer using EPSG:3857 and another layer using ESPG:4326.


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So I finally found the solution to this problem. You have to override the spatialReferences array of the WMSLayer object right before adding it to the map. wmsLayer.spatialReferences[0] = 3857; map.addLayers([wmsLayer]); This worked with a layer using EPSG:3857 and another layer using ESPG:4326.


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With 10.2 and above, you can use the Add Geometry Attributes tool to add a field with the length of the features. The tool lets you specify the coordinate system you want to use, in case it is different from the dataset's system. With 10.0, you should work in ArcMap: set the coordinate system of the data frame to WGS 1984 UTM 32N add a field to your ...


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Few things: Starting with the precision of measuring an computing areas and distances based on OSM basemaps. OSM tiles are using a geographic coordinate system which is pseudo-wgs84. That is mainly aimed to speed-up display on computer resolution, while distorting the shape and size of map element, i.e features. Hence using those tiles-base maps to ...


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Until it get fixed You can do as follows with one more step: Calculate heatmap as normal Create new raster with Raster > Projections > Warp(Reproject) - leave the original projection Magic - the new raster is exactly where it belongs :) I got this answer from @Joseph who gave helpful comment in the duplicate thread: QGIS 2.8 Raster Layers Moved and ...


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If shape is important, consider a Lambert conic conformal projection, with two standard latitudes. Distances will be consistent in the vicinity of each of the standard parallels. See wikipedia.org/wiki/Lambert_conformal_conic_projection wired.com/2013/11/projection-lambert-conformal-conic georeference.org/doc/lambert_conformal_conic ...


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I see your code this way : import arcpy arcpy.env.workspace = arcpy.GetParameterAsText(0) fcList = arcpy.ListFeatureClasses() inFolder = arcpy.ListFeatureClasses() template = arcpy.GetParameteAsText(1) outFolder = arcpy.GetParameterAsText(2) srf= arcpy.Describe(template).spatialReference for fc in fcList: if ...


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public static bool CompareSpatialRefs(ISpatialReference sourceSR, ISpatialReference targetSR) { IClone sClone = sourceSR as IClone; IClone tClone = targetSR as IClone; // first level test compares the coordinate system component if (!sClone.IsEqual(tClone)) return false; ...


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Trying to project first; import arcpy arcpy.env.workspace = arcpy.GetParameterAsText(0) fcList = arcpy.ListFeatureClasses() try: inFolder = arcpy.ListFeatureClasses() template = arcpy.GetParameteAsText(1) outFolder = arcpy.GetParameterAsText(2) desc = arcpy.Describe(template).spatialReference arcpy.BatchProject_management(inFolder, ...


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this is how I identified different projections. Keep in mind that depending on different datum you need the right transformation. You would need elif for each transformation. for lyr in lyrlist: if lyr.visible == True: desc = arcpy.Describe(lyr) Ref = desc.spatialreference.name if "ETRS" in Ref: ...


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If those "strange" coordinates do not fit to Gauss-Krueger coordinate systems, they might be similar to the "preußisches Koordinatensystem". You will find some links to that in my answer to Conversion of coordinates of "Bochum coordinate system" You have to put up a custom CRS on the point "Trockenberg" in Cassini-Soldner projection, which was ...


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If the transform is unknown, you could use one of the commonly used models that would estimate your transform. If the speed is an issue, you should start with the most simple solutions, check the precision of your model based on the RMSE (you seem to have a large number of points, so you can have a good estimate of the RMSE) and then increase the complexity ...


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I used qgis to produce a Mercator map. Saved the image. Then use flexify plugin from flaming pear with coral Painstshop(works in Photoshop too) to convert from Mercator to gores. Flexify has lots of conversion options.


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The N or S value of Latitude is whether the location is North or South of the Equator. W or E for Longitude, is W or E of the Prime Meridian. The number that follows the letter is the Degree of Latitude or Longitude, followed by minutes and seconds of Latitude/Longitude displayed as floats. The alpha-numeric values should not be ignored as they are part of ...


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I’m still not quite sure what went wrong when I hit the “Display XY Data” button, but here’s the work-around that fixed it; I made a new map and put the dataframe into WGS 1984. I then added the excel file and selected Display XY Data. Once that came up I exported that into a shapefile. I then opened a new map, set the dataframe to NAD 1983 (the projected ...


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You can obtain the spatial reference of a feature class using the IGeoDataset Interface: ' Spatial reference of a feature class Dim geoDataset As IGeoDataset Set geoDataset = featureLayer.FeatureClass Set spatialReference = geoDataset.SpatialReference http://forums.esri.com/Thread.asp?c=159&f=1707&t=223709 OR '''<summary>Get the spatial ...


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You can do this by going into the catalog and checking the properties window of each feature class under XY Coordinate System. The quickest way would be to compare WKID numbers of each layer. You can also use the Describe function to identify the spatial reference and compare them. see this for more info on this.


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You can use the Describe function to get information about your spatial references. Then simply use logic to screen out the spatial reference you do not want. import arcpy arcpy.env.workspace = r'C:\path\to\your\fgdb.gdb' fcs = arcpy.ListFeatureClasses() for fc in fcs: sr = arcpy.Describe(fc).spatialReference.name # Note that you can add ...



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