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When geographic coordinates are plotted "without projection", they are really being projected via the Simple Cylindrical (aka, Equirectangular, or Plate CarrĂ©e) projection. (It goes by many different names.) Geographic coordinates, as latitudes and longitudes, are said to be unprojected because they define positions on a (curved) sphere or ellipsoid – ...


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Michael Miles-Stimson had the same idea as me, but since you aren't familiar with coding, here's another (similar) option. Turns out this is pretty easy to do using Field Calculator. Create a field called something like "Orientation" and make it a text type. Open the field calculator and set the parser to Python. Tick the "Show Codeblock" box and enter ...


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The following Overpass API Query will return the center of your building: [out:json]; way(292833530); out center meta;


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Because the Earth is not a sphere, measuring the latitude from the equator plane is the only way to have circular parallels. Therefore I think that any geographic coordinate system that would not use the equator plane as a reference would have more disadvantages than advantages. If you need a specific coordinate system, I would therefore rather suggest ...


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The order of Lat/Lng is fairly embedded in the framework with no configuration entry. You can have a look at the code on github if you're interested: https://github.com/openlayers/ol3/tree/master/src/ol/geom Unless you want to rewrite the parts of code that influence this, your only option is to format the data appropriately. You might try something like ...


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You can calculate RMSE of geographic coordinates the same way you would calculate it in a projected coordinate system. The only catch is that if you're using decimal degrees, the RMSE will be in decimal degrees as well. In geographic coordinates, decimal degrees is far better than degrees-minutes-seconds, in my opinion. You have to make two columns each for ...


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0.01192239336492888 is your pixel size see more information on world files so you can work this out if you know the number of pixels your image is http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/World_file you only need your top left for images in ArcGIS TO SAVE TIME: you know you can use Build Footprints (Data Management) ...



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