Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

10

Google Earth uses WGS84 as its reference standard. The latest version was created in, you guessed it, 1984. So, we know that your original points utilize a different reference system. You need to find out what that is in order to apply a transformation to your points if you would like to view them accurately in Google Earth. EDIT: As others have mentioned - ...


6

There is a nice tutorial on segmentation of spatial lines which you can find here, and you could make use of CreateSegment to achieve your goal. But first of all, let's create some sample data. ## german borders library(rgdal) library(rworldmap) data(countriesCoarse) spy_germany <- subset(countriesCoarse, GEOUNIT == "Germany") ## polygons to lines ...


5

This function will create a systematic point sample of a SpatialLinesDataFrame. The LID column in the results corresponds to the row.names of the source line object and can be used to relate the points to the lines. # Function for creating a systematic point sample of a SpatialLinesDataFrame # x SpatialLinesDataFrame # sdist ...


3

I did some reformating to your data: N, E, height -15.04074, 34.71926, 1037 -15.05633, 34.71407, 1053 -15.03052, 34.70221, 1165 -15.03939, 34.69643, 1334 and it loads perfectly as delimited text inside Malawi: Note that QGIS always wants coordinates in East - North order, unless you specfiy it in the header. Southern and western coordinates require a ...


2

Depending on how the coordinates were sourced (say, off a 1:25k topographical map), 100m error is quite likely. Getting accurate geographical coordinates in the 1960s was a lot more complex operation than it is now. At that time in the UK there is a good chance your coordinates are unprojected UK National Grid coordinates, most topographic mapping at this ...


2

You can create a custom CRS with these parameters: +proj=omerc +lat_0= -22.5 +lonc=25.09 +alpha=0.910238 +k=0.99977264 +x_0=0 +y_0=0 +gamma=0 +a=6378249.145 +b=6356514.966398753 +towgs84=-143,-90,-294,0,0,0,0 +no_defs +to_meter=10000 And you get the 10km-grid as described: I took the old ARC 1950 datum from EPSG:4209 as base, which was common in ...


2

If you want to replicate the status bar shown in the image, do this: Add a QMainWindow in Qt-Designer. A QStatusBar is added by default. Add widgets (2 QLabel) to the status bar in your Python class: self.lblXY = QLabel() self.lblXY.setFrameStyle( QFrame.Box ) self.lblXY.setMinimumWidth( 170 ) self.lblXY.setAlignment( Qt.AlignCenter ) ...


2

Seeing as though you have no matching attributes to join you will need to perform a spatial join. This is under Vector>Data Management Tools>Join Attributes by Location


1

The SpatStat package has a function for creating points along lines at specified intervals. # maptools to read shapefile require(maptools) require(spatstat) # Load a line shapefile myLine <- readShapeLines("~/workspace/TEMP/myLine.shp") plot(myLine) # create a PSP object to use with spatstat myPSP <- as.psp(myLine) # Create points at 10 km ...


1

A UTM projection uses eastings and northings with units of metres, which look like the ones you have shown. To get Latitude and Longitude, you need to reproject it. In the ArcToolbox: Data Management Tools > Projections and Transformations > Feature > Project And for the Output Coordinate System, choose: Geographic Coordinate Systems > World > WGS ...


1

From the GeoTools Referencing FAQ - Can I just use Referencing without the rest of GeoTools? Yes, you will need to use the metadata module, and one of the epsg modules. Along with their dependencies such as units. Then all you need to do is: CoordinateReferenceSystem sourceCRS = CRS.decode("EPSG:4326"); MathTransform transform = ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible