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5

I don't believe you can calculate a position from these values. These look to be bearings and distances - a direction around a circle from a known location. The known location could be anywhere in the world, and the boundary lines are drawn in the direction and distance listed from that known location. These are used to create lot boundaries. Basically ...


5

I'm not really sure but maybe check if you meant EPSG 4326 instead of 3857.


2

Just in case you want the distance along the parallel of latitude (and not the shortest distance) between two points at a given latitude, distance = r * (longitude 2 - longitude 1) with longitude in radians and where r, the radius of the parallel of latitude, is r = R * cosine latitude where R is Earth radius.


2

Use the field calculator. If you have a field (like start_x), use the field calculator with the expression !SHAPE!.firstPoint.X, and for a field like end_x you would use !SHAPE!.lastPoint.X. for your Y coordinates, you would use !SHAPE!.firstPoint.Y and !SHAPE!.lastPoint.Y Check out the arcpy geometry documentation(http://desktop.arcgis.com/en/arcmap/10.3/...


2

If you aren't too concerned with a precise location, this is pretty close to the SW corner of the highlighted part of the image you provided: 33.061973, -117.202343 This was found by google map search for "Fortuna Ranch Rd, Encinitas" and then zoom into the property location. I chose the SW corner because of the fence line crossing is a little more ...


2

For javascript you can use proj4.js. Its conversion function is called proj4.


2

Looks like you're using a CRS in metres but trying the style it using a degrees based format. You'll either need to set the grid projection to a geographic one (ie WGS84), or use a different coordinate format.


2

I had the same problem (Arcmap would not import my csv file with headers, instead it would show Field1, Field2, Field3 etc). When I examined the file headers in Excel, I found...decimals numbers, spaces, percent signs etc. After replacing all of that with underscores or text, I had no problems. I dragged the .csv file into arcmap, opened the attribute ...


1

First, when you load the data using shp2gpsql-gui, ensure that you've set the SRID on the data correctly: you have determined your data are EPSG:3763, so use that number in the SRID field of the GUI. Now that your data is correctly loaded, you can get back geographic coordinate by using the ST_Transform function to convert them from their local system into ...


1

In your csv, create a new 'size' field that counts the number of decimals in the lat/long fields. Use that as a sort of key to buffer the points at variable distances (and hence, create your polygons of different sizes). EDIT for less vagueness: In Excel or similar, extract the number of decimal places into a new column (let's call it 'size' since you are ...



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