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4

there are several categories in the utm section of esri crs projected. go to the projected coordinate systems. then to UTM, Then look at the nad83 BLM (US Feet). That should work in both autodesk and esri. (EPSG) 32165


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I can tell you from experience using GPS enabled cameras, and doing research on handheld GPS accuracy, there is a portion of your data that will be completely wrong (I had photos collected in Qatar showing up in Brazil). Additionally, the accuracy of the photo will be dependent on the surrounding (forest cover, buildings, etc.). Consumer grade cameras are ...


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Try .. 70 deg 25' 42.8" N 67 deg 47' 52.8" E From Here


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Approach #2 seems to be the more comfortable one. You should have a look at natural earth data for a shp ( www.naturalearthdata.com/downloads/10m-cultural-vectors/10m-admin-0-countries/). Regarding the flight path I am not sure if it is always a straight line. You should consider that.


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Have you tried making a custom projection? Here is a walkthrough from esri knowledgebase.


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I'm not sure who you consulted, but this doesn't seem like great advice. The problem seems to be not one of negative values but more the order of x and y co-ordinates. A latitude (y) can only be in the range of -90 to +90. Longitude (x) can be -180 to +180, broadly speaking. These co-ordinates are from the equator and the Greenwich meridian, respectively. ...


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When you say that you have imported your CAD drawings into ArcGIS, I am assuming that you now have either file geodatabase feature classes or shapefiles. Consequently you should be able to perform a spatial adjustment transformation on them: Transformations move or shift data within a coordinate system. They are often used to convert data from unknown ...


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Haversine is used for the great circle distance (shortest distance following the sphere curvature). So it does not take the height into account. For straight line distance, I would first convert your lat/long/radius+alt triplets to XYZ in a 3D cartesian system (see here). Then you can apply your equation. Because your points are very close from each ...


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I guess the bogus coordinates are set to what they are because HTC is a smartphone made in Taiwan, and the coordinates they are set with are either those at their factory, or from the store from which the phone was sold (the map did show two "HTC"s close by). To prove that something like that is the case, I checked another photo which I know was taken in ...


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For Openstreetmap, the parameters are quite simple: http://www.openstreetmap.org/#map=10/47.1911/2.4884 http://www.openstreetmap.org/#map= : base url 10/ : zoom level 47.1911/ : latitude of center, North positive 2.4884 : longitude of center, East positive ...


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If you are working with anything but points, you need to convert your shapes to WKT (well known text) columns, and then save that as csv. There is an expression in qgis 2.2 field calculator, it is in a geometry branch, named - geomtoWKT. Haven't tried it. If that doesn't work for you, try searching for other ways to get WKT columns. Just saving layer as csv ...


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Import of coordinates from a CSV table can be done with Add delimited text. To create a line from them, use the Points2One plugin. Or use the MMQGIS plugin to do both steps together.


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try this: cur = arcpy.UpdateCursor(in_featureClass) for row in cur: row.xDD = row.SHAPE.extent.XMin row.yDD = row.SHAPE.extent.YMin cur.updateRow(row) It doesn't matter if you use XMin or XMax - as these are the same for points.


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Whenever you're checking if 2 strings are equal, it's usually best to ensure that case sensitivity won't impact your results. As it so happens, the string returned by arcpy.Describe().shapetype is not in uppercase; it's actually in title case. But since you're not interested in the case of either, just convert the type to upper case: type = ...


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There are a couple of ways to get the data you want. Since your question is asking specifically for coordinates and not actual GIS data (ie a shapefile), this question may be off topic / more appropriate at the Open Data StackExchange. My first suggestion is the second link at http://www.stats.indiana.edu/maptools/ which will give you a coordinate list of ...


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Free TIGER County Shapefile, not sure what software you use, but Feature to Point in ArcMAP will give you center points from the county shapefile.


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Short answer The containerPoint methods date from a feature request back in 2012, and today, they're a bit confusing. The best answer is Leaflet maintainer Vladimir Agafonkin's description: "layerPoint is actually a point relative to the map layer (the div which contains tiles and markers), not the outer map container. What you need is ...



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