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Step -1 Set SRID to your Table - SELECT UpdateGeometrySRID('Table Name' , 'the_geom' ,32645) Step -2 SELECT *,ST_X(ST_Transform (the_geom, 4326)) AS "Longitude" ,ST_Y(ST_Transform (the_geom, 4326)) AS "Latitude" from "Table Name"


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How are you defining these "Euclidean distances"? Just using lat-long as x-y cartesian coordinates? That will work fairly well for small areas but at some point you have to realise that the X-coordinates are getting closer together at the poles. If I'm standing two metres from the north pole my feet could be at maybe 30W and 30E (perhaps I do the ...


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The coordinates are in MGRS (Military Grid Reference System) which is a projected coordinate system. Those coordinates give you an accuracy of 0.1 meters since there are 10 trailing digits. You can batch convert the coordinates in online websites like this The first 3 charcters are the "grid zone desiganation" : 38R the next two characters are the ...


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This is WKB format wichs is a binary representation of the geometry. To select the geometry in GeoJSON format for example you can use : ST_AsGeoJSON()


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There is a Go To XY tool on the Tools toolbar that lets you enter an XY coordinate and see it as a graphic on the map. The point can be shown by several different graphics (flash, point, labeled point, callout).


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Make sure that you are using an EPSG code of http://www.opengis.net/gml/srs/epsg.xml#4326 instead of epsg:4326 so that the X/Y lat/Lon mapping is fixed rather than variable as it is with epsg:4326. Then make sure you are encoding the geometries that you send in the same order as you have told GeoServer to expect them. See the GeoServer documentation for a ...


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Use two nested loops: for (var i = minLat; i <= maxLat; i+=0.03) { for (var j = minLng; j <= maxLng; j+=0.03) { arr.push([i,j]); } } Also, with a fixed distance between each coordinate pair. keep in mind that the earth is not a flat surface, so a difference of 0.03 degrees of longitude is not the same over different latitudes.


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For an example of how to do this in code (Python/GDAL), look at this example in the GDAL cookbook, in particular the world2Pixel() function. I've added some comments to show what the variables are:- def world2Pixel(geoMatrix, x, y): """ Uses a gdal geomatrix (gdal.GetGeoTransform()) to calculate the pixel location of a geospatial coordinate """ ...


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If you have a source image with these limits φmin, λmin and φmax, λmax that has been warped to target image with these limits Nmin, Emin and Nmax, Emax surely you can do simple bilinear interpolation to map a general point from φ, λ to N, E? Just rearrange (φ - φmin) / (φmax - φmin) = (N - Nmin) / (Nmax ...


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Were the original pre-merge lines all pointing in a sea to source direction? If not then merging multiple lines flowing in opposite directions will cause the problem you are seeing. The solution is before you merge, you flip the lines that need flipping so they all flow from a source to sea direction.


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These are (most probably) NAD83 California State Plane Zone 6 with feet units. I'm attaching a screenshot from QGIS so you can see the EPSG code EDIT: and as mkennedy said, perhaps one of the adjustments.


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San Diego is in the State Plane California Zone VI (6) zone, and the coordinates are in US survey feet. The false easting and false northing values for that zone are 6561666.6667 and 1640416.6667. The false easting/northing values are often excellent indications of what coordinates should look like for that projected coordinate reference system (CRS). A ...


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In QGIS, you'd use Layer > Add delimited text layer



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