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Just as said in other answer, you can't change order in the framework itself. An alternate syntax to revert your coordinates order could be: var a = [ [-21.929054, 64.127985], [-21.912918, 64.134726] ]; var b = a.map(function(coord) { return [coord[1],coord[0]] }) var lineString = new ol.geom.LineString(b); You can see that coordinates order ...


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The order of Lat/Lng is fairly embedded in the framework with no configuration entry. You can have a look at the code on github if you're interested: https://github.com/openlayers/ol3/tree/master/src/ol/geom Unless you want to rewrite the parts of code that influence this, your only option is to format the data appropriately. You might try something like ...


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The following Overpass API Query will return the center of your building: [out:json]; way(292833530); out center meta;


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I have found the solution on this stackoverflow topic .So here how I did it. i request every node of the building using this: http://api.openstreetmap.org/api/0.6/node/ + one of the node and then the formule: latitude1 = the lowest latitude latitude2 = the hightest latitude longitude1 = the lowest longitude longitude2 = the highest longitude ...


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Connected to my database world_borders, I did (the first and the last point must be equal): CREATE TABLE geometries (name varchar, geom geometry); INSERT INTO geometries VALUES ('Polygon', 'POLYGON((50.488453280451964 30.816523649043251, 50.227886556627098 31.15709614260982, 50.227886335531331 31.157096406770776, 50.227468173402542 31.157506958998855, ...


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In the question, you state that the coordinates are in Lat/Long, but you later say that you define the coordinate system of the file as being British National Grid. Might you have defined the file as BNG (a projected system) when the data is actually in a geographic format? This might explain the points not showing up anywhere in the data frame.


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Some people use rotated spheres as a basis for further mapping. I turned up a blog post about the capabilities of D3 here with has examples and here's another page about the some of the math behind it, although from a graphics perspective. For earth solutions, usually a sphere is rotated rather than an ellipsoid because of the simpler mathematics. Not ...


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Because the Earth is not a sphere, measuring the latitude from the equator plane is the only way to have circular parallels. Therefore I think that any geographic coordinate system that would not use the equator plane as a reference would have more disadvantages than advantages. If you need a specific coordinate system, I would therefore rather suggest ...


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Actually the answer is very easy 1) Calculate XMax XMin YMax YMin in Field Calculator with Python !shape.extent.XMax! Create 2 Fields where you calculate the difference between XMax and XMin, same for Y. Calculate Ratio All bigger than 1 is landscape, all smaller than 1 is portrait


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Michael Miles-Stimson had the same idea as me, but since you aren't familiar with coding, here's another (similar) option. Turns out this is pretty easy to do using Field Calculator. Create a field called something like "Orientation" and make it a text type. Open the field calculator and set the parser to Python. Tick the "Show Codeblock" box and enter ...


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If JavaScript is an option for you, you can use the geocoding service of Google maps API. When you send a geocoding request, you get in response a GeocoderResults object. One if its properties is a geometry object, which in turn has a property called bounds. This is actually a LatLngBounds object, that represnts the area of the geocoding result. This ...


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You can calculate RMSE of geographic coordinates the same way you would calculate it in a projected coordinate system. The only catch is that if you're using decimal degrees, the RMSE will be in decimal degrees as well. In geographic coordinates, decimal degrees is far better than degrees-minutes-seconds, in my opinion. You have to make two columns each for ...


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When geographic coordinates are plotted "without projection", they are really being projected via the Simple Cylindrical (aka, Equirectangular, or Plate CarrĂ©e) projection. (It goes by many different names.) Geographic coordinates, as latitudes and longitudes, are said to be unprojected because they define positions on a (curved) sphere or ellipsoid – ...


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0.01192239336492888 is your pixel size see more information on world files so you can work this out if you know the number of pixels your image is http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/World_file you only need your top left for images in ArcGIS TO SAVE TIME: you know you can use Build Footprints (Data Management) ...


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I will calculate the intersection of two paths, one starting at Point A using the bearing from Point A to Point B, and the other path starting at 89.99999N, 179.99999E bearing 180 degrees. That will give me the approximate point on the 180.



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