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0

I cannot help you explain why the extra digits are truncated. Instead I suggest they do not matter; a decimal co-ordinate with 6 digits is accurate to <0.1m. See this answer: http://gis.stackexchange.com/a/8674/24270 or the wikipedia article: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Decimal_degrees


2

You can use the Feature Vertices to Points tool with BOTH_ENDs option checked, on your lines, that will give you start/end points of the lines. Then Add XY Coordinates to populate the resultant points with Lat / Long values. Another way to go about your workflow.


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Did you take a look at any those lines to see what might be going on? Their start and end points may actually be in the same place, if they were drawn incorrectly. Select one of them and zoom to it. If it shows up as a point, that's why the XY coordinates of the start and end points are the same. Depending on the coordinate system you're using, it's also ...


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A simple pyqgis script will do this but the following approach should also work: use Extract Nodes to get a point layer of all the vertices. add X and Y coordinate columns using $y and $x now you can get the y max coordinate for each polygon. Try the Group Stats plugin to get these values for all the polygons.


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Of course you can. You must translate your string to an array of coordinates readable by your map. Something like that: var polyCoords = []; var coords = "95.61,38.60 95.22,37.98 95.60,37.66 94.97,37.65".split(' '); for (var i in coords) { var c = coords[i].split(','); polyCoords.push(ol.proj.transform([parseFloat(c[0]), parseFloat(c[1])], ...


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It looks like that feature geometry is corrupted, as the coordinates are just the min/max bounding box of the SRID as set by the WMS. (Plus or minus a few significant digits) The problem seems to stem from EPSG:900913 being defined incorrectly. 900913 is no longer in use, it has since been changed to 3857. The bounding box should be +/- 20 million X and +/- ...


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I've used the onFeatureAdded event and added code to pick up the coordinates using the thisevent.layer.name and thisevent.bookmark strTempLayer = thisevent.layer.name application.map.layers(strTempLayer).records.bookmark = thisevent.bookmark set tempShape= application.map.layers(strTempLayer).records.fields.shape ...


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First, it helps to know what you are doing in generally used terms. In this case it is an inverse projection or a reprojection when you go from projected (or plane) coordinates "back" to geographic (or spheroidal) coordinates. Second, you need to know what projected coordinate system you have on your screen, in order to specify the inverse. Not being ...


5

dimension(): refers to the topological dimension (i.e. point/line/area) coordinateDimension(): returns the dimension of the tuple as given (as statet in the OP) spatialDimension(): returns the dimension of the tuple without the measurement part (with "M" being the measurement in a linear reference system) As it's pretty obvious for a 2D or "4D" literal, ...


2

Of the three opinions expressed so far, yours, Benjamin, makes the most sense to me: X, Y and Z are spatial dimensions and M is some other coordinate/dimension. Disclaimer: I've never heard of those function names (coordinateDimension and spatialDimension) before so I'm no authority. And I'm not sure I could claim any bounty if ever I'm proved correct!


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This looks like an encoded polyline to me - for the algorithm to encode/decode, see: https://developers.google.com/maps/documentation/utilities/polylinealgorithm Google also has an online tool that can encode/decode: https://developers.google.com/maps/documentation/utilities/polylineutility As you noted decoding your polyline seems to result in locations ...



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