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Your coastlines screenshot shows coordinate x=704137, y=9324475. I guess this could be EPSG:32748 "WGS 84 / UTM Zone 48S". Change the CRS in the layer properties from layer coastlines, on tab "General" and check if both layers line up.


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Short answer: Go to this layer's symbology and under Categories pick a unique Value Field, push "Add All Values" and OK. Long Answer: In the Table Of Contents (the window on the left that contains the XY points layer), right click the layer of XY points and push "Open Attribute Table". Here you need to find a field with a unique value for each row, which ...


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UPDATE brb_point SET geography = way::geography;


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ST_Intersection(geomA, geomB) returns a geometry, then calculate areas with ST_Area.


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As you've probably discovered, copying tables from a PDF and pasting into a spreadsheet doesn't work very reliably; Libreoffice seems to have a better chance of parsing the table and creating a usable spreadsheet (that you could then save as CSV or open directly in QGIS). More reliably, use SmallPDF.com's PDF to Excel converter (or PDF to Word for ...


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Yes, you can do that. You might want to look into spherical trigonometry for that. Though i personally find it much harder to interpret the results this way and would project the data into a metric-based crs like utm before doing any arithmetics.


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Try something like that, where dx,dy are number of indexes: from osgeo import gdal file = gdal.Open( ’file.tif ’) def pixel(dx,dy): px = file.GetGeoTransform()[0] py = file.GetGeoTransform()[3] rx = file.GetGeoTransform()[1] ry = file.GetGeoTransform()[5] x = dx/rx + px y = dy/ry + py return x,y GetGeoTransform() function ...


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Gdal probably has a handy function. Have you looked at these links? But knowing that the header of the image contains the bounding coordinates and projection information, you could calculate them yourself (not recommended unless you enjoy learning things the hard way). EX: I knew my pixel size was 30m. For point 3,4 from the origin it's simple algebra: 3x30 ...


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This sounds like a fun problem. I would consider: Read the land boundary shp file using one of these recipes: How to install Fiona to read Shapefile attributes with OSGeo4W?. It would probably be good to read it into a Shapely geometry. I like using ogr to read shapefiles: import ogr import shapely driver = ogr.GetDriverByName('ESRI Shapefile') ...


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you might want to try Overpass Turbo to extract villages from OpenStreetMap (see license). I tend to find OSM has better detail in some countries than Google Maps. And they should be more accurate than 1 minute resolution of Geonames. Zoom the map to the extent you want, and use this query. This will return Geojson [out:json][timeout:25]; // gather results ...


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You can download any dataformat, such as a shapefile, of the borders. Then open that dataset in QGIS, and export it to GeoJSON (or download GeoJSON right away). Then right-click that .geojson file and open it in any text-editor, such as Notepad++. You will now see each vertex (i.e. coordinate) in that dataset (attention: the coordinates are in the coordinate ...


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You could take a look at the Global Administrative Boundaries project. Several different formats to choose from, and you can select the level at which you'd like boundaries (for states, you might just need level 0). When I ran through this workflow, I selected KMZ format and level 2, extracted the KML file via 7-zip, and used this service to get the ...


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The OSM boundaries application https://osm.wno-edv-service.de/boundaries/ provides downloads of borders of administrative units that are mappen in OpenStreetMap. Maybe that will be of use to you.


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Importing Data There is a very extensive technical article, that can be found at the ESRI Knowledge Base. The article covers version 9.x to 10.x: "Import XY data tables to ArcMap and convert the data to a shapefile" As mentioned above, starting with ArcGIS 10 just use the "Add Data" tool from the main menu: Adding Data For your second question please ...


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In ArcGis 9.3 Adding x,y coordinate data as a layer Click the Tools menu and click Add XY Data. Choose a table that contains x,y coordinate data. If the table is not on the map, click the Browse button to access it from disk. Click the X Field drop-down arrow and click the field containing x-coordinate values. Click the Y Field drop-down arrow and ...


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If you loaded your data into something like PostGIS, and your Hexagons had a unique ID or similar unique value, you could use the ST_Intersects function to intersect the hexagons and the Cities. Then use a row_number function with a partition and order clause to essentially group the Cities by the Hexagon ID they fall within and order them in descending ...


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This is quick and dirty. Most of this was adapted from the following website: http://www.movable-type.co.uk/scripts/latlong.html I haven't tested this too much but it seemed to work after initial testing. It will return a list of lat, long coordinate pairs along a line at a specified interval. I wrote it in python since I don't know php very well. from ...


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I managed to solve the problem by converting all of the coordinates to contain in the formula to SWEREF99TM before I calculated the closest point. Then, I converted the closest point found with the formula, back to WGS84. I used SWEREF99TM because it is a grid system, so the formula will work correctly. Note that this will probably not work outside of ...


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self.coordTransform = self.coordinateTransformation(4326,3309) It looks like you have your source and destination coordinate systems mixed up.


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you can't really convert convert distances in degrees into meters as the size of a degree varies as you approach the poles. convert your locations into a projected coordinate system, then calculate your distances.



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