New answers tagged

4

In the attribute view create your new columns as decimal (floats). Then enable editing, and use expressions to update the columns. To get the latitude (x-coordinate) of the start of a line feature, use the expression x_at(0). To get the end of a line feature use x_at(-1). Repeat for your longitudes (y-coordinates). You select the column, type in the ...


4

You have your four columns: X-start; Y-start; X-end; Y-end. Using the field calculator for each column update using: $x_at(0) $x_at(-1) $y_at(0) $y_at(-1) This asks for the coordinate at the start of the line (the zero) and the end of the line (the negative one). This will provide you with a decimal latitude and longitude, so ensure the columns are ...


1

Use label expression: def FindLabel ( [OID] ): mxd = arcpy.mapping.MapDocument("CURRENT") lr=arcpy.mapping.ListLayers(mxd)[0] with arcpy.da.UpdateCursor(lr, ('Shape@','POINT_X','POINT_Y'),r'"OID"='+str( [OID] )) as cursor: for row in cursor: row[1]=row[0].firstPoint.X row[2]=row[0].firstPoint.Y cursor.updateRow(row) ...


0

Read the JSON standard and GeoJSON standard - they specify everything from commas to brackets to property fields in the geographical data.


1

The points look like this, when drawn in a cartesian coordinate system:


-1

The reason was that the turf.bboxPolygon takes a list of floats/numbers and not a string


1

Alternatively to your solution (which seems to work in ARCGIS), you can set up an oblique mercaor projection. This would work in QGIS and GDAL-based software as well: PROJ.4 : +proj=omerc +lat_0=55.102476 +lonc=1.42624 +alpha=-43.22 +k=0 +x_0=0 +y_0=0 +gamma=0 +datum=WGS84 +towgs84=0,0,0,0,0,0,0 +units=m +no_defs OGC WKT : PROJCS["unnamed", GEOGCS["WGS ...


-2

WGS 84 is not a projection. It is just a coordinate reference for the ellipsoid shape of the earth. The next step is to choose a projection for Cartesian representation. WGS 84 UTM 32N is a projection.(Using UTM) There lies the discrepancy.


1

As a first guess, you can create a custom transverse mercator projection on one of you coresponding points. Preferably the one closest to the DXF origin: +proj=tmerc +lat_0=41.045452 +lon_0=28.895929 +k=1 +x_0=1.03521 +y_0=-6.34918 +ellps=GRS80 +towgs84=0,0,0,0,0,0,0 +units=m +no_defs lon_0 and lat_0 are the degree coordinates in WGS84, and x_0 and y_0 ...


2

Have a look at How to georeference a vector layer with control points?, in particular the answer concerning the Vector Bender plugin for QGIS. Watch the video and try the plugin, report back if you encounter any issues.


1

I think you have to carry out three transformations, wich are all affine transformations: scale, rotate and translate. I suggest reading about affine transformation on wikipedia: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Affine_transformation If you basically can carry out an affine transformation, then this might help you to determine the correct parameters: http://...


1

The plugin in the accepted answer is not available anymore. The Affine Transformations is available and is very useful. With this plugin you can create a formula. In the screenshot I shifted all cells with 17.396 (meters) to the north.


0

The problem here is that you have THREE coordinate systems.... The lat-long coordinates you get from a GPS, also known as WGS 84 or EPSG:4326 The transformed coordinates of the projection. Often these are in metres or kilometres on the ground in an approximate cartesian (ie right-rectangular) coordinates. What are the units of these? Is the detailed ...


0

You must convert the "description" field of your csv file into label annotation following the DGAL OGR Feature Style specification http://www.gdal.org/ogr_feature_style.html. See a text label example from the section 2.1 A text label, taking the text string from the "text_string" attribute field: "LABEL(f:"Times New Roman",s:12pt,t:{text_string})...


0

Set quantize to false before adding featureLayer to map. featureLayer.quantize = false;


0

Extending Allison's answer, which will insert a CSV into QGIS, you can then use "Vector > Geoprocessing Tools > Convex hull". The convex hull tool will create a minimum boundary polygon around a group of points. You have the option to create this polygon around all points, or create several polygons around point clusters that share common attributes ( ...


0

Step -1 Set SRID to your Table - SELECT UpdateGeometrySRID('Table Name' , 'the_geom' ,32645) Step -2 SELECT *,ST_X(ST_Transform (the_geom, 4326)) AS "Longitude" ,ST_Y(ST_Transform (the_geom, 4326)) AS "Latitude" from "Table Name"



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