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0

I believe that's because your Python is using ArcPy to call Geoprocessing tasks, which are running in 64-bit processes. ArcObjects happens in 32-bit processes.


1

The solution is so simple. All you need is a Cost Distance Raster from the start point as well as from the stop point. Just use the Raster Calculator to add these two together and you will get a raster where the value of each cell representing the length of the shortest Cost Path it belongs to. So it is also possible to derive the area of self-defined ...


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I could finally solve the problem by running PathDistance from the command line as described here : PathDistance example 1 (Python window) http://desktop.arcgis.com/en/arcmap/latest/tools/spatial-analyst-toolbox/path-distance.htm. I do not get the evenly fairly spaced lines even if I do not use a cost surface but only the SRTM DEM as surface raster and ...


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Using Excel I computed speed of travel (V, km/hour) vs slope (degrees) using Tobler’s formulae: Defined time (T, seconds) needed to cross single cell in my DEM (2 m in my case): T=3600*2/V/1000 For every slope in range (-80,80,1) and exported results into 2 columns text file (abcd.txt): Placed point (centres) in the middle of my DEM and computed Path ...


2

The tool you are looking for is the SAGA tool Accumulated Cost (isotropic). To calculate the accumulated costs, you will need a "destination" point and the cost raster as input. Note that the destination point is needed as a raster cell, so you need to convert shape points (using e.g. the GDAL rasterize tool). From there on, if you want, you can use the ...



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