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7

Eduard Imhof’s Schweizerischer Mittelschulatlas is probably the best example of applied beautiful cartography ever. Codex99 has a very good presentation of him and his work here: Imhof wie ein Kartographische Rockstar


6

UPDATE The new files are now available and known as "Cartographic Boundary Files". More detail on the other types here http://www.census.gov/geo/maps-data/data/tiger.html The County file discussed above is available here: http://www.census.gov/geo/maps-data/data/cbf/cbf_counties.html The official file is not currently available as of 5-12-2011, but ...


5

Maybe this site may have what you are looking for ?? http://www.gadm.org/ and http://www.gadm.org/country regards Kurt


4

You could find a topological representation of county boundaries, such as the CTA boundary files (another source would be the OpenStreetMap, but that's not as complete) and then pick out all distinct pairs of county IDs on opposing sides of boundary lines - e.g. in the CTA files, there's these two fields in the link entity (as described in the ...


4

For Germany, Austria and Switzerland and other European countries, you can find the data from the Eurostat (different levels of NUTS). Those are the "official ones". You have 1 294 entities at level 3.


4

Follow these steps: Download a us counties shapefile. Here's one that will work. Import the zipped UScounties file into CartoDB as a new table. Change the fips column's data type to number. (click on the word 'string' right below 'fips' and select number). Click the merge tables button on the right side of the tool bar when you are in data view. Choose ...


3

http://www.gadm.org/home has one for whole world in vector format. You download data in several formats. Shp file format may have some problems with column length and local names. But if you use english names that doesnt show up


3

Since you mention you are a programmer, here's some code that works with arcgis 10. Update: If you don't feel like programming, I've posted a zipped shapefile of the graph here. public void TestGetNeighbors() { var fLayer = ArcMap.Document.FocusMap.get_Layer(0) as IFeatureLayer; var dict = GetNeighborsByName((ITopologyClass)fLayer.FeatureClass, "{0} ...


3

UPDATE: Added spatial index to improve performance and brief instructions for using this script on Windows. #------------------------------------------------------------------------------- # This script will build an adjacency table in csv format representing # county polygons that "neighbor" each other. This script is intended # to illustrate the use ...


3

I would look carefully at the data sources listed in The Spirit Level. The authors of this book (who are epidemiologists by training) analyze state and county level socio-economic data for the USA, and compare it to socio-economic data for a selection of OECD countries (23 to be precise). They provide a download link for the data (which requires a form to be ...


3

I don't think BLS unemployment data is available by ZIP. The MelissaData source does not actually report unemployment by ZIP code, it tells you the unemployment of the county in which the entered ZIP code is located. For example, a search for 02451, a small ZIP code in Waltham, MA (population 60k) returns 826k people in the labor force. This number must be ...


3

The easiest way would probably be to use a layer with the city boundary of San Diego. You can obtain this from the SanGIS (San Diego Geographic Information Source) website. Use the boundary layer and do a spatial selection for any census tracts that have their centroid within the city limits. Another option would be to go to the Census.gov website and ...


2

You can also just overlay the areawater layer from the 2010 TIGER files if all you need is a quick way to mask out the water areas. The areawater layer is pretty big and cumbersone, though.


2

Orienteering maps are good example of high scale maps. Very small features are represented on such maps, with a very detailed representation. The way to make such maps is rather well formalised in this document.


2

Regarding the correlation between zips and counties. The zip code boundaries are generally stable, assuming the post office doesn't close a ton of offices like some people think they need to do. The big problem is that many zip code areas cross political boundaries. Some small cities can be entirely within a larger zip code. While it is possible to match ...


2

I am not sure how you are going to know or check the shoreline clipped aspect of your question. Esri has some datasets that are described as detailed (dtl). However you would need to aquire the Data Distribution Application (DDA) [see page 8 of the pdf] to get them into shapefile as they originate as *.sdc format. Data is provided in Esri’s compressed, ...


2

Found the cartographic files here


2

The GADM boundaries are pretty good, however you'd probably want to review them on a country-by-country basis. GADM is agnostic about what the administrative units are called, just referring to them as administrative levels one through N. If your goal is to get roughly 2,500 km^2 units, just divide each country's total area by counts at the different ...


1

You best bet is: http://www.naturalearthdata.com/ Has administrative area shapefiles.


1

Just use a Spatial Join. You can do this with QGIS (free to download; you may already be using it). Here is a tutorial that does exactly what you are trying to do using nursing homes as points (you'd use your GPS locations instead) and boroughs as polygons (you'd use Counties). Tutorial


1

There are a couple of ways to get the data you want. Since your question is asking specifically for coordinates and not actual GIS data (ie a shapefile), this question may be off topic / more appropriate at the Open Data StackExchange. My first suggestion is the second link at http://www.stats.indiana.edu/maptools/ which will give you a coordinate list of ...


1

Free TIGER County Shapefile, not sure what software you use, but Feature to Point in ArcMAP will give you center points from the county shapefile.


1

I can give you 3 more options: 1.- OpenStreetMap. You can export the administrative boundaries with some tools. 2.- Quattroshapes 3.- GeoPlanet (Yahoo) You can download it from these link: http://ydn.zenfs.com/site/geo/geoplanet_data_7.9.0.zip Here you can check the info: http://isithackday.com/geoplanet-explorer/ And, of course, these 2 you already ...


1

I simply did an intersect of census blocks to the various entities in my layers -- aggregating the population figures 'up' rather than slicing them 'down'. More accurate -- larger volume of data, though.


1

The Census Bureau produces a County Adjacency File which is easily parsed.


1

The US Census Bureau publishes tons of spatial maps. One of these that is interesting is the "Counties and Equivalents". These can be downloaded here: http://www.census.gov/cgi-bin/geo/shapefiles2010/main Once you have that, there is a shapefile importer for SQL Server here: ...


1

Hey Glenn where did you find the county file that hugs the land? Did the Census ever release a better file? I'm working with data from 2003, so I'm ok with pre-2010 county lines. County shapefiles still seem to bleed over onto water.


1

You can use the YQL console to find all kinds of concordance for a given WOEID, eg. for Austria the query is 'select * from geo.concordance where namespace="woeid" and text="23424750"', try the following link and click the 'TEST' button. ...


1

You can go the other way with /concordance/fips/{id} according to http://developer.yahoo.com/geo/geoplanet/guide/api-reference.html#api-concordance. Whether this helps probably depends on how many fips labelled objects you have.



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