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4

QGIS has its own internal handling of layers and features. Different data "providers" are used to pull layers in from a variety of sources (eg PostGIS, OGR file types, WFS servers, etc) and translate them into QGIS' own internal formats. Once you have a project fully loaded, including a .shp file plus a .dbf, plus another CSV joined, are all the data in ...


4

Editing CSV files inside QGIS, AFAIK, is not possible. Never the less, while importing the CSV with the add delimited text tool, you have a option to choose what characters to ignore. If your data does not have any ' beside the ones on your problematic strings, you can simply add that characther to that option and it will never be imported in qgis in the ...


3

Uncheck the "Coordinate GMS" option which I believe in English is "DMS coordinates". The csv file you linked to is not in degrees/minutues/seconds but in XY coordinates. Unchecking this option should let you import the csv as a point shapefile.


3

The problem may be with the way you are referencing the CSV file and how python interprets a slash symbol. You have: HRU06 = "F:\Users\User\River\HRU06.csv" It should be: HRU06 = r"F:\Users\User\River\HRU06.csv" Python should then interpret the text as raw text and it should work, assuming the comments above are valid. As a side note you should ...


2

For the first part of your question, you could use a Custom script in your model to fetch and write the raster statistics to a csv. This would replace your Step 4. Raster Layer Statistics. To do this, go to Processing Toolbox > Scripts > Tools > Create new script and copy the following (note: change the path of the text_file_path): ##Raster statistics=name ...


2

If you have TransCAD, you can use the Caliper Python module that lets you access TransCAD and it's programming language GISDK via a program written in Python. With it, you can write a Python program like the one below: import sys, traceback, caliper dk = caliper.Gisdk("TransCAD") rh = dk.GetFirstRecord(view_set) for row in ...


2

Yes you will need a different layer per projection. Each layer can only have one projection in QGIS and QGIS will reproject them together for display.


2

After displaying your points as X,Y data you need to save the layer to a spatial format that is useable in the ArcMap geoprocessing tools. You can right-click on the points in your table of contents and choose to export them to a shapefile (or other format). Once this has completed, choose the option to add the new layer to the map. Use this new layer as ...


1

CartoDB have a limit on the number of columns that can be contained inside a dataset. If you have more than 250 columns of data, you would need to structure the file in a different way in order to be able to generate a dataset in CartoDB. You can find more information here.


1

You could duplicate the layer in the Layers panel and give the duplicate a rule based style displaying only the null values, setting the rule as, for example, "area" is null.


1

One way is to set Null values as NaN or some unused no like -9999.0 and make another class for this.


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I don't know how much or what type of information you have in your .CSV, but I looked at files of mine which for instance hold over 500,000 streets (polylines) where the .DAT file is 90MB and another file with 2,500 cities (polygons) where the .DAT file is only 400KB. If you'd like to send me the .CSV I can covert it to .TAB for you through MI and see if I ...


1

The CSV should be: ID,AssetID,SampleTime,Lat,Lon,Value 1,1,2015-01-01T10:00:00,10.00,62.00,15.2 2,1,2015-01-01T11:00:00,10.10,62.11,30.25 Written like you have it, there is an extra double quote that might make the parser think you have an attribute named ,Lon,Value (although it would be better if the code just threw an exception at the un-closed double ...


1

I had the same problem of QGIS reading a CSV file (saved from MS Excel 2011 on my Mac) as a single row. So, I re-saved the Excel worksheet as "Windows Comma Separated (.csv)" and QGIS was able to read it just fine.


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Here is the best solution I have found thus far using dbfpy and arcpy. import arcpy from dbfpy import dbf from arcpy import env def DBFtoCSV(): '''Convert every DBF table into CSV table. ''' env.workspace = pathlist[1] # Set new workplace where tables are located tablelist = arcpy.ListTables() # list tables in file for table in ...


1

If you use QGIS, download the plug-in named MMQGIS. There's is an option to Google Maps KML export. It is quite simple.



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