Tag Info

New answers tagged

6

While PostGIS can handle mixed geometry types, this won't help you for QGIS. Regardless of their source all layers in QGIS can only be of a single geometry type.


0

From the plugin web page: column separator The plugin will read the first line of the file to count the occurrences of ,, \t, |, and ; as possible delimiters of columns. You can disable this auto-detection by passing the separator option. In other words, by default the plugin will look for a number of separators other than comma as the column ...


2

You can use the Field Calculator to create a new column and then use a similar command like the following in the expression: toreal("your column") for real numbers. toint("your column") for integers.


1

Canada Post keeps a tight reign on its claimed copyright of Canadian postal codes. The site 'geocoder.ca' referred to in the update is one of several sites that Canada Post has dragged into the Canadian court system. Basically, Canada Post makes money selling the information. Canada Post has gone so far and trade mark the spelling 'Postal code' (note the 'c' ...


4

I think that the script is expecting to read in a set of regularly spaced points, with deviations less than the minimum tolerance. Your set of points is actually quite irregularly spaced: You can see that there are large missing areas. Also, if you zoom in closer, you'll see that even at the fine scale, the points are not regularly spaced on a grid ...


2

I've always get the failed to load table error when dragging or trying to access xlxs sheet in ArcGIS. One option that works for xlsx is the Excel to Table tool.


0

If you import to a file geodatabase table you will be able to handle a lot more rows than that. It sounds like you are currently trying to use dBase or MS Access.


3

Look at the samples on the specification site. You'll need to write a script in the language of your choice that will get you from [ {"date":"2014-09-25","time":"20:49:09","lat":"53.269","lon":"6.935","depth":"3.0","place":"Meedhuizen","mag":"1.5","type":"GH","last":"True"}, ...


0

You could try with ogr like this from osgeo import ogr driver = ogr.GetDriverByName("CSV") datasource = driver.Open("path\to\csv.csv") for i in range(datasource.GetLayerCount()): layer = datasource.GetLayer(i) srcSpatialRef = layer.GetSpatialRef() srs_wkt = srcSpatialRef.ExportToWkt() #save the srs_wkt into shapefile.prj


0

I have figured it out! for anyone who might be having the same issues... Here is the expression which I used in Numbers to return the x-coords: INDEX(E,ROW(cell),1)+INDEX(B,(ROW(cell)−1),1) where E is the column containing x-shift, and ROW(cell),1 is the address of the x-shift for any given row… B is the column containing x-coords, and (ROW(cell)−1),1 ...


1

Instead of loading the .csv using Add vector layer, use the Delimited Text layer tool. It will try to detect the most fitting data type for each column. For more details see the QGIS user guide.


1

For reading csv files, it is easier to use csv:DictReader (or pandas with pandas.read_csv). from csv import DictReader reader = DictReader(open("xxxx.csv"), delimiter=',') The result is a Python dictionary with the values in the first row used as the fieldnames/keys Example reader = DictReader(open("my.csv"), delimiter=',') from row in reader: ...


1

As mentioned in the answer to QGIS 2.0 text delimited layer importing data as single row: The Add delimited text layer plugin does not use the .csvt file. The .csvt file is only interpreted by OGR - that means when you load the .csv using Add vector layer. You will find some hints on Mac-specific problems with delimited text too. Apart from that, ...


0

You might want to see this post: Join non-spatial CSV to spatial data in QGIS And here is a video demo on how to join CSV data to Shapefiles in QGIS: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=82aRDdJdhI0



Top 50 recent answers are included