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If you don't like creating of VRT file mentioned above, you can use MyGeoData Converter - the import tool will create the VRT file automatically. Coordinate column is detected if the attribute name of X coordinate is: x, xcoord, xcoordinate, coordx, coordinatex, longitude, long or the attribute name contains: x_*, *_x Similar for Y coordinate: y, ...


4

According to the ogr2ogr csv documentation and also this answer, you need to specify which fields contain the geometry in a VRT file: <OGRVRTDataSource> <OGRVRTLayer name="test"> <SrcDataSource>test.csv</SrcDataSource> <GeometryType>wkbPoint</GeometryType> <LayerSRS>WGS84</LayerSRS> ...


0

Circumventing ogr2ogr for the first conversion, I've found a unix tool that will allow me to do this (https://github.com/mapbox/csv2geojson) csv2geojson -lat "latitude" -lon "longitude" input.csv > intermediatefile.geojson I use a constant name for the output file so it gets just overwritten a bunch of times, but now I can convert to kml ogr2ogr -f ...


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Circumventing ogr2ogr for the first conversion, I've found a unix tool that will allow me to do this (https://github.com/mapbox/csv2geojson) csv2geojson -lat "latitude" -lon "longitude" input.csv > intermediatefile.geojson I use a constant name for the output file so it gets just overwritten a bunch of times, but now I can convert to kml ogr2ogr -f ...


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For whatever reason, when saving .csv files in Excel, it uses a different character for line breaks, that QGIS does not recognize. In your terminal convert the line breaks to the standard '\n' by inputting: tr '\15' '\n' < infile.csv > outfile.csv QGIS should now recognize it.


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Here's what I would do Using the XML document they sent you, create a geodatabase and then a new feature class to the specifications of the XML by right-clicking in the GDB and choosing Import > XML Workspace Document. This creates a new feature class in the schema you have to match. Then I would create a new feature class from your CSV data, building a ...


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There is a native (non-plugin) solution within QGIS: Right-click on your shapefile layer and select "Save as". Select CSV format; Deselect "Add saved file to map"; Under "layer options", select GEOMETRY AS_XY (for point files) or GEOMETRY AS_WKT (for points, polygons or lines). For point files only, this will output a CSV file with an X and Y column in ...


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You can use the Geometry Export to CSV function on your shapefile to obtain coordinates via: MMQGIS > Import/Export > Geometry Export to CSV Make sure it is enabled in Plugins > Manage and Install Plugins...


2

You have to find a programme, where you can write the extention by hand. For windows you can do it in Gedit. First you type the line "Integer","real",... and so on, as it is written in previous answer and after clicking 'save as' you delete the given extention and type 'csvt' for example programme gives 'fields.txt' then you delete 'txt' and write csvt ...


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I did a test by saving a simple text file in 4 different encoding formats: ANSI Unicode Unicode big endian UTF-8 I then took the above text files, imported them into Microsoft Excel (by dragging the text file), saved these as .csv files and tried to load them into the Value Map widget. Interestingly, only the data from the ANSI and the Unicode csv ...


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I was having the same issue than you, and then realize that it was a problem on the data. In order to log those errors on the console, you have to put: omnivore.csv('your_file.csv', null, L.mapbox.featureLayer()).addTo(map) .on('error', function(error) { console.log(error); }); And it will tell you which line is not working, such as an invalid lat ...



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