Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

11

This is typically something you can do with Data Driven Pages. The static text and images is not a problem, you can modify one lay out and this will be transmitted to all other layouts. For the dynamic text, it can be driven based on one of the attribute fields using this syntax " domainlookup="true"/> The most complicated part is what you show on the ...


8

That feature is called Atlas in QGIS and you'll find it as part of the Print Composer. It's described in the user manual.


7

The only attribute table accessible through Dynamic Text is the attribute table of your Data Driven Pages index layer. I'm assuming your Data Driven Pages map book is based off of your grid layer, and if so then you're in luck. Using a dyn tag of type 'page', you can access any property of the index layer <dyn type="page" ...


6

I was wondering about the same but found that there is no such out-of-the-box tool. I made an add-on for this. You can download it here: http://www.arcgis.com/home/item.html?id=a9b032f739254ebeb6221c9294ebc886


6

I was able to do this when I had them for ArcGIS 9.3 and it works very good. I dont know if this will work with ArcGIS 10.0 or later as it stated on their website but I'd give it a try. ArcMapBook Edit: This can be accomplished by simply creating a rectangular page for each set of layers stacked directly on top of each other. Name each page separately ...


5

You will need to set up two map documents, one for portrait and one for landscape. Your index layer will need a field to store the page orientation, something like "Pagesize". Then use the definition query on your index layer to limit which features will be included in that set of maps, e.g., [Pagesize]="85x11P" or [PageSize]="85x11L". It's pretty ...


5

There isn't a really an elegant way to do this, as far as I know. However, I've recently successfully accomplished something similar using multiple copies of the layer and using Page Definitions. Here's the basic idea, and you can modify it to suit your needs: The layer which defines your Data Driven Pages should show the symbology but no labels. Then, ...


4

I think your requirements would be most easily and intuitively met by having a single map with all the layers included and then to write a simple Python script that uses layer.visible to toggle layers on/off before exporting each page using ExportToPDF. PDFDocument can then be used to append the pages into a single PDF file. The technique is described in ...


4

I'm assuming the page numbers are pulled from the attribute table of the layer you are using to create the DDP and can therefore add a dynamic attribute. If you have two text boxes one on each side for odd and even pages I think you should have two separate fields in the attribute table, one for odd the other even which would only display the text on the ...


4

The Field Calculator configuration below can be used to set values on any odd numbers in your Odd pages field (and blanks in the other rows). In order to simulate a Data Driven Pages index for test data, I used Create Fishnet to create a polygon feature class in a file geodatabase, and then added text fields 4 characters in size called Odd and Even. This ...


4

What you are describing sounds like Page Definition Queries: Page Definition Queries allow you to specify which features of a layer draw based on an SQL query. Though similar to other definition queries, Page Definition Queries differ in that they only work with Data Driven Pages and are dynamic. If this is not what you are after then I recommend ...


3

There is an excellent article written about generating pdf-documents using arcpy. It takes you through the basics and also shows more sophisticated features. Combining data driven pages with Python and arcpy.mapping You can easily generate an index page using pyfpdf. With arcpy you also have access to the contents of your polygon index dbf-file.


3

It may be that what you are looking for is to be able to flow/wrap text within rectangular text elements. How to do this is documented here.


3

If you have not already gone through the ESRI arcpy.mapping tutorials and ArcGIS Resources pages, they have heaps of sample scripts to comb through. I would suggest looking at these first: arcpy.mapping / Map Automation Group ArcGIS Resource, Python for ArcGIS Tutorials: Introduction to arcpy.mapping Getting started with arcpy.mapping tutorial ...


3

11.Type the following for the text: Coordinate System: dyn type="dataFrame" name="Detail Map" property="sr" srProperty="name"/ dyn type="dataFrame" name="Detail Map" property="sr" srProperty="projection" preStr="Projection: " newLine="true" emptyStr=""/ dyn type="dataFrame" name="Detail Map" property="sr" srProperty="datum" preStr="Datum: " ...


3

This code may help. It does not use Data Driven Pages, but more or less emulates their functionality, while enabling you to have the flexibility to use the extent of each feature in your index layer to set the extent of both the Main Map and the Overview, before zooming out the Overview by a factor of 10. I think DDP is great for creating "no code" map ...


3

I haven't played much with Data Driven Pages but if your tower ranges are all in the same feature class, you might be able to use Page Definition Queries to automatically display just one specific tower per page.


3

Here's my thinking in pseudocode: you'd get your MapDocument, then ListDataFrames, then ListLayers. Then you should be able to iterate through the Layers, toggle the Layer's Visibility property on, ExportToPDF (or whatever), then toggle Visibility off again, and move on to the next Layer. If you want to leave certain layers on as base layers, maybe you ...


3

I think you should put Data Driven Pages (DDP) to one side for now, because if that introduces any limitations to an application like this, they can usually be overcome by using a SearchCursor to iterate through the feature class that would have been your DDP index. The key thing will be whether you can get ArcPy to run arcpy.mapping.ExportReport to run ...


3

I would set up the DDP using the pipeline as the ddp layer. In the Python script, iterate over the pages and check the data frame scale. Using some conditional logic, you can calculate what the scale for that map should be, and then export. Here is part of a script I have used in the past: import arcpy mxd = arcpy.mapping.MapDocument(r"C:\MyMap.mxd") df = ...


3

First thing, set up your Data driven pages on the inset map - then what you can do is in your data driven pages setup dialog - on the extent page - set the map extent to best fit - say 105% - this way it will always zoom to the parcel of interest. On the other data frame - adjust you scale so it is fixed at 800.


3

Yes, the overlap can be adjusted in the DDP toolbox. In the second tab "Extent" there is the option to set the map extent. If you change this value to 100% there should be no overlap between your pages assuming the layer you are using lines up correctly.


3

I don't think there is a way to do it without manipulating the data in some way. You can dissolve your feature class on the field you want to group on, creating a second feature class. Then use that feature class with DDP to generate the pages, but don't have it visible. Instead you can display your original features. As long as you don't add it to the ...


3

You can export to other formats, however you will have to use python/arcpy module: How to export Data Driven Pages to other formats using ArcMap: You can use a simple arcpy.mapping script to export Data Driven Pages to formats other than PDF. This example shows how to export Data Driven Pages to a series of PNG image files. mxd = ...


3

To do this I would recommend that you investigate Page Definition Queries which do not require the use of ArcPy. You will find a few previous questions that involve them on this site like Hiding selected features in ArcGIS for Desktop using ArcPy or ModelBuilder?


3

A work around would be to use the ExportToTIFF method within the data driven page loop. Here is a code example: mxd = arcpy.mapping.MapDocument("CURRENT") df = arcpy.mapping.ListDataFrames(mxd, "Layers")[0] for pageNum in range(1, mxd.dataDrivenPages.pageCount + 1): mxd.dataDrivenPages.currentPageID = pageNum arcpy.mapping.ExportToTIFF(mxd, ...


2

Why wouldn't you put all the towers in a single feature class, perhaps as a circle feature representing the range for each, and then use a Dynamic Text element for the title, reading it from a field in the data? Am I misunderstanding your requirements?


2

To ensure that the correct scale is used (in my case, the scales are valued stored in a field scale_field), the following code is added to the for loop which exports all the maps (the input document must have Data Driven Pages Enabled): #some code here mxd = arcpy.mapping.MapDocument(inputMapDoc) df = arcpy.mapping.ListDataFrames(mxd)[0] #using the 1st data ...


2

I'm simply reposting the code from above as an answer because I found it really useful but it took ages to find: import_path = r"..." # Path of .mxd export_path = r"..." # Path of output file field_name = "Name" # Name of field used to sort DDP mxd = arcpy.mapping.MapDocument(import_path) for i in range(1, mxd.dataDrivenPages.pageCount + 1): ...


2

Firstly merge all your polygon (extent) files into one. Then add a column to the merged ddp index file called "scale" for example and populate this with the optimum scale. Then create a definition query for say scale=10000 (for 1:10000), set your scale etc and save this as mymxd_10k.mxd, repeat for the other scales. Then use the basic script from my ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible