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You should specify the software you are using when asking this type of question. Based on other questions I gather you are using ArcGIS, which is capable of on-the-fly reprojection. This means it will automatically reproject data to the coordinate system (CRS) of the dataframe (which either you set or is set to that of the first layer you add with a defined ...


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In this case, you need to know exact CRS your XY data represents. For that use reference data such as imaginery, aereal photography and compare XY data with known locations. For this you can use pluggin coordinates capture is useful. Please refer when using Datum transformations to parameters values, as @Gerardo Jimenez pointed out: ...


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Whenever you have to transform or convert data between two geographic coordinate reference systems (GeoCRS, also called datums), you may find that there are zero, one, or multiple possible transformations available. If there are multiple transformations, they usually differ by area of usage and/or accuracy. Some countries like Belgium have published ...


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The use of geographic vs projected is more up to you and your analysis needs. Based on what I've read so far in this question, it is not necessary for you to project into a UTM zone. However if you aren't consistent in picking the correct type of CRS, you will get alignment issues. Generally speaking (and there are exceptions) if your coordinate units are in ...


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NAD1983 is a geographic coordinate system. There are a few different ways you could go about aligning these data, but I'll give an example that I think is simple and clean. (1) Add both of your CSV tables to ArcMap and plot the points. Make sure you plot them using the correct geographic coordinate system - File1(NAD1927) and File2(NAD1983). Right click the ...


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The code looks like the USNG or MGRS coordinate system, see https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/United_States_National_Grid and https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Military_grid_reference_system for further details. 12RVU indicates that you are in UTM zone 12, somehwere in Western Mexico. You might need to read the manual on how to change the setting (I don't have the ...


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If you're reprojecting on the fly then QGIS will make it appear in the same place. It's hard to say more without a better description of what you have and what you are trying to do.


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Both CRS you mention (SIRGAS-Chile / UTM zone 19S and WGS 84 / UTM zone 19S) use the same ellipsoid with towgs84 set to all zero. So they can be regarded as identical. Apart from that: A point in the map remains on its position, regardless of the CRS you are saving it with. If you use an older CRS with a certain shift to WGS84, like PSAD56 / UTM zone 19S, ...


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Firstly why are you doing this and secondly how? If you are plotting the points based on the 5361 and manually entering their coords then this is their location. If you wish to load it into a 32719 project then it should go in providing you have enabled on the fly projections in options . settings. the how, is another question. If you are just right ...


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We have set our Garmins to the Indian Thailand 1975 datum with Everest 1830 spheroid. Seems to match. Otherwise running WGS 84 gives us grids that are 3-5KM shy of true location.



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