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4

This will be possible with the Project tool with ArcGIS 10.4 (already available as pre-release). An additional parameter 'Vertical' allows you to specify an input and output vertical coordinate system, in addition to the horizontal coordinate system: This new parameter is mentioned in this What's new in 10.4 document (without much detail).


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The offset that you have between your bathymetry and your elevation model relates to the difference between the Mean Seal Level (MSL) and the Lowest Astronomical Tide (LAT). From the well written text found here we can read that: The MSL surface is in a state of gravitational equilibrium. It can be regarded as extending under the continents and is a ...


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Try splitting your raster into smaller parts. It seems to be really big. I just found this post: http://forums.esri.com/Thread.asp?c=93&f=995&t=225045, someone had a similar problem as you: Quote from link above: Any count exceeding 2^31-1 will therefore "roll over" into the most negative numbers; for instance, (2^31-1) + 1 will appear as ...


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A great tool that is often used for vertical datum transformations is called V-datum, developed by NOAA. This is the tool that I have seen cited most often for similar tasks with a range of different datums including tidal. The V-datum docs has some information, as well as this gis.stackexchange answer on EGM96. I'm not familiar with lowest astronomical ...


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PDAL can do this for you, and the easiest way to use PDAL is to install Docker Toolbox and then follow the PDAL Docker Tutorial to verify you have the basics working. Once you're confident things are good, run the following command on the data: docker run -v //c/Users/Howard:/data \ pdal/master \ pdal translate //data/point_cloud_classified.las ...


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At first, as you did not tell, you want to create a raster form the points. A similar question about this can be found here: How can I create an DEM from Point-Data Second, I think there are tools in grass, callable from qgis, to make a depressionless dem, like the r.fill.dir tool. Other GIS-people tend to use saga gis functions, as described here: ...


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Ok, so I found a solution to my problem. I basically don't change the method described in the question. However, I add a step before step 1: Clipped the buffered river polygon layer (with a "cliff area" polygon layer, which I derived from the DEM's slope I created with the slope tool) so that cliffs have no influence on step 2 Clipped the buffered river ...


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you can subsample aster to 4 m and combine both DEMs using simple IF ELSE statements. Note that no new information will be created in the subsampling.


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It can be done in QGIS. It's called digitising when you're drawing over a scanned map (image, or raster in GIS terminology). Check this handy, simple yet accurate tutorial Digitizing Map Data and come back if you run into more questions.


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I suggest you to explore the Generalisation toolbox. Usually different combinations of its tools are used for tasks like this. http://desktop.arcgis.com/en/arcmap/10.3/tools/cartography-toolbox/an-overview-of-the-generalization-toolset.htm


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You need to import it as a CSV file. Since you're new to GIS, I suggest you follow this tutorial: Importing Spreadsheets.


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Suggested workflow: Draw perpendiculars to road segments at regular step Interpolate them to 3D lines using DEM Convert vertices to points Find lowest point If it is “close enough” to centreline, road runs in depression This shows the test I’ve applied to check if already existing streams are matching newly developed DEM: You can also check results ...



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