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There are several ways to accomplish what you want. You've left out some specifics such as what extensions you have available and what license level you're using, as well as how thoroughly you want to sample the raster (ie how fine is your grid). I'll make some assumptions. The simplest, if you want a point for every cell in the DEM, is the Raster to Point ...


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I'd recommend looking in TileMill to create an mbtiles file, which you can then unpack into a standard tileset. You can style imagery very nicely in TileMill, and then export with your chosen number of zoom levels. That's how I created the elevation basemap layer on this simple map. You could pull imagery into TillMill also, and get the google earth look ...


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Short answer, use the DEM. Handheld GPS units of the type you mention (consumer grade), can potentially use two different methods to figure elevation - the calculated GPS position or an internal barometric altimeter. Because of the way GPS works (explained at the page mkennedy originally linked to in a comment, and elsewhere), without high-grade, corrected ...


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We developped an algortim and you have a type of solution in http://wikhydro.developpement-durable.gouv.fr/index.php/D%C3%A9tection_de_remblai_avec_le_LIDAR. R-Grass sources working in the processing tools of qgis are available if you want Best regards Frédéric Pons Cerema


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There are many solutions (look also at generating TIN from DEM using MacOSX/Unix tools?) GRASS GIS (Mac) with r.out.xyz or r.out.ascii for example; QGIS (Mac) with various solutions (and SAGA GIS or GRASS GIS commands in the Processing Toolbox) with the GDAL library; with Python and the osgeo.gdal or rasterio modules; with R ... And even with lesser ...


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New to ArcGis 10+ is the Raster object... this needs a bit of an idiom shift to get used to it. To turn a file path into a raster use arcpy.Raster("d:\\path\\to\\raster.ext") or just "raster.ext" if it's in your current arcpy.env.workspace. This also means that you need to get rid of these objects using del. Some tools will work with either a path or a ...


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I recommend getting a 3D Analyst license and using Add Surface Information. Or, use Interpolate Shape followed by Add Z Information, which allows some features to return NA values without crashing the entire program. Otherwise, there are two proven free methods that require more legwork. It is possible to implement these from within QGIS, so that you don't ...


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If you're only looking to get the location of the lowest or highest point on the line then this is how I would go about it. Set up your point file and get z values from the dem. Extract your attribute table to excel and use a lookup to match your max/min z value (whichever you are looking for) for each line to the appropriate x and y values. You can then ...


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From the help: Mask—A dataset that defines which locations in the inputs will be considered in the execution of the tool. If the mask dataset is a raster, all cells with a value will compose the mask. Cells that are NoData in a raster mask will be NoData in the output. If a feature dataset is used as input for the mask, it will be converted internally to a ...


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The best way to exclude areas from raster processing in ArcGIS is with the Mask Environment Setting. To use it, you will need a positive mask that covers the areas that you want to process, rather than a negative mask that covers the areas that you want to exclude. To create a positive mask, draw a really big polygon and clip it with the features covering ...


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Shouldn't matter if it is just the data frame, but looking at the dimensions and orientation of those tiles it looks like you have a projected data frame or data. Have the tiles been projected? You'll need the original geographic tiles. For something small like this I usually just mosaic rasters with the Image Analysis toolbar and export that to a file after ...


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What I think you mean is Co kriging your temperature data based on a DEM. What you need: -Shapefile of points with temperature data -DEM of your study area You need to have the geostatisical analyst tool (see customize, toolbars). Open de geostatisitcal wizard in this toolbar. You can now choose kriging/co-kriging. You need to select two datasets. So the ...


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Could you rasterise the building envelopes, then use the raster calculator to add this and the dem together. Now you will have the elevation of the buildings added to the dem


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I believe you want to change the values of the pixels to reflect the elevation change. To do this, I would make a copy of the DEM, and create a layer that would contain the building envelopes. From there, I would select the pixels from the DEM that fell within the building envelopes, and add whatever value necessary to get the water to flow around them. You ...


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An answer in another thread pointed to a software that seems to be what I'm looking for. It's called Leveller and is made by Canadian company called Daylon Graphics. The software is paid and sadly has no trial version. http://www.daylongraphics.com/products/leveller.php


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Indeed, the results of a single-geometry InSAR analysis yield Line of Sight deformations. When using a double geometry (both imagery in acscending and descending directions) the vertical component can be computed. The horizontal deformation measurement is in that case sensitive in the East-West direction en far less sensitive in the North-South direction ...



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