Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

15

A few suggestions: Add a thin white border to your inset map, to separate it from the main map. In your example, the thin black line doesn't do enough to differentiate the inset from the main map: When adding leader lines from the inset map to the inset frame (which shows the extents of the inset map on the main map), do it in Layout view and make ...


12

You can do it in QGIS using symbol transparency, feature blending mode and symbol color. Notice the difference between Layer Transparency and blending mode(that will be applied to all features) and the symbol transparency and feature blending mode that will stack with other features in the same layer. All seetings are available in Layers Properties > ...


12

I like keeping them simple in regards to the outline and leader line. Below are two examples of Key Maps, though not Insets they show two things that can be done to enhance the readability of yours. 1) In yours, you have two leaders (which would look better if attached to the corners), try to reduce them to one: The red square is the extent indicator for ...


7

not sure if the users are IOS or Android but maybe the list/interface icon it would go nicely with what the user is used to seeing in other apps, unless of course its already being used for something else.


6

I think the work of Ian McHarg (a landscape architect) is still relevant. Design with Nature was a major influence on development of GIS. Edit: Also, the GeoDesign Summit (which starts tomorrow in Redlands) might result in some on-line resources. Several of the presenters are Landscape Architects.


4

The attached cartouche is a favorites because the native vegetation really adds another dimension to the map. The following link is a tremendous resource for examples of historic cartouches and should help you in your extremely interesting work. Best of luck! Examples of historic cartouches


4

100K is short for 100 thousand (kilo) and is used as shorthand for a scale of 1:100,000. This can be extrapolated to the other examples. For completeness 8GK appears to stand for Pulkovo 1942 / Gauss-Kruger zone 8.


3

I'm not sure for the first example, but the second one is an image of the line density (a raster data created based on a kernel that produces an weighted sum of the lines in a neighborhood). in practice, you can do it with arcgis line density (spatial analyst) and you will find open source hints here EDIT: the first example was thus well lines with a ...


3

Here is an extended solution for the problem of automagically labelling a polygon with the area as it is created. In the labelling dialog, use the Expression Based Labelling Engine (credit to Nathan) to implement this line "Field ID" || '\n' || toint( $area / 10000) || ' ha' The layer has a UTM (metres) CRS and so calculates the hectares on the fly. ...


3

You may look at data driven pages. The default use is to have a dataframe with the "inset" and an overview frame smaller on the page. But there would be nothing keeping you from setting up the overview frame as a large map With the pages as each inset you want highlighted, and then put the inset frame on top or next to the overview frame. Did that help? You ...


3

Buffering bottleneck When using ST_Buffer you can reduce the complexity of the resulting shape by adding a lower num_seg_quarter_circle option. This should reduce the amount of processing when buffering, and in subsequent operations. From the PostGIS documentation: Generally in PostGIS you will get better performance if you run queries against ...


3

I have a good example of the use of GIS in Landscape Architecture, namely for urban green areas. If you colect, say by remote sensing, the locations of trees inside urban areas, also called ornamental trees, and you add alfanumerical information to each one, by field survey, all this inside a GIS environment, you have a powerfull tool to manage, project and ...


3

There are some studies on the use of eye-movement tracking. The principle is to capture what the user exactly reads and to analyse the result. See the popeye and animeye projects for more information.


3

I would suggest a combination of programs. Your existing data is most likely in either shapefiles or autocad files so you can use those as a base. One option is to export those files to an Adobe Illustrator file (AI) which is then used to create good looking graphics. For the effect on the buildings, use 'drop shadow' in AI; it works great.


3

A quick Google search turns up some interesting finds: Landscape Architecture and Evolving GIS The Landscape Architecture Data Model - A Case Study in GIS Data Modeling And as always, look through the references, as they can always lead to even better finds.


2

Many LA's still see GIS as a Planning tool versus a Landscape Architecture/Design tool. I have worked with quite a few that just have not found the traditional set of GIS tools to meet the same quality or capabilities as a large sheet of paper and pencils or markers.Many will use a CAD system that supports not only the design but also creation of ...


2

Not thinking at all about architecture, for all Web mapping applications, you want to do as much of the processing ahead of time. This means that if you can, buffers should be pre-computed, all of your data should be in the output SRS, etc. Obviously, some data and calculations need to be dynamic. I suggest that beyond Python, you look at MapServer and ...


2

I like the simple cartouche example you provided because I am from the Yukon. This may not be the answer you're looking for. However, it seems to me like you already have your answer. The cartocuche you want is to be reflective of your audience. It will contain relevant info for the specific content of the map as well as graphics designed that represent the ...


2

I actually worked on that and I used QGIS, GRASS and geotools + opencarto java library to achieve my goal. I can give you the main steps : From academic literature, it seems the smallest MBR is the best method to find the building main orientation (important to know to calculate the solar panel yield). First of all you will need to compute the main ...


2

Automatically calculating fields have been discussed on the QGIS mailing list a few months back. They are definitely on the wish list. I don't think anyone is currently working on this feature though. For now, you can use database views to achieve something similar, as Devdatta suggested. Spatialite or PostGIS will do just fine.


1

Generally speaking, your first step will be to create lines between the origin and destinations. They can be simple straight lines, follow routes, or be representative curved lines - it all depends on how you want the map to look and the legibility of your mapped data. The next step is to get your passenger counts as attributes of the lines you create. ...


1

Try dataframe clipping located in the Dataframe Properties > Data Frame tab. You can clip the dataframe by current visible extent, outline of features, outline of selected graphics or by custom extent.


1

Not sure if your question is regarding open source tools or sources of information but I recall doing a project in school and found plenty from an internet search. just a few starting points might be worth mentioning: GRASS documentation (my favourite place to start): http://grass.fbk.eu/grass62/manuals/html62_user/r.sun.html European assessment examples ...


1

I have used ArcGIS in my job as a landscape architect. Our practice has used the piece of software to draw figures and compile georeferenced data such as landscape character areas, landscape planning designations. The beauty of this is that you can store the layers and quickly switch them on and off and use them on multiple projects without having to redraw ...


1

I am a GIS analyst and work part of my time in a landscape architecture department, mostly on extreme event modeling (storms floods etc), but also statistical modeling for studies of landscape aesthetics. It really depends which branch of Landscape architecture you are concerned with. For examples google the work of Ian Bishop (Univ Melbourn), David Mark ...


1

This question is in an interesting area: deconstructing map design. Here is my answer to the 10 points: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 9, 10 apply equally to maps 6, 7 and 8 can be replaced by 'what layers will you use', 'what is your scale of interest', 'what is the best way of presenting your spatial data; thematic map, points, polygons' but I don't think its the ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible