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It depends on what coordinate system you're using. If you are using a projected coordinate system (with units in meters or feet), you can use the field calculator (use the Python parser) with this expression: math.hypot(!SHAPE!.firstPoint.X-!SHAPE!.lastPoint.X, !SHAPE!.firstPoint.Y-!SHAPE!.lastPoint.Y) Or if you want distance on the earth's ...


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You can use Feature Vertices to Points tool with the option to put the points at the Start and End of the line. Then use the Near tool or the Point Distance tool, this will then give you the linear distance between the end and start point. This can be added to a model to automate it. ...


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In QGIS you can try the Distance Matrix of Saga (under Processing > Tools > Saga > Shapes - Points). This calculates a distance matrix for all points in one layer only, but does include an ID. Just combine the two layers into one (e.g. with Vector > Data Management Tools > Merge Shapefile to One). Make sure that you have some attribute that makes it possible ...


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To effectively use shapely it is important to first project your coordinates into a projected coordinate system that is appropriate to your region, for example, epsg:27700 if you are based in the UK. A good way to do this is using pyproj: import pyproj as proj # setup your projections crs_wgs = proj.Proj(init='epsg:4326') # assuming you're using WGS84 ...


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You can do this using the Network Analyst Extension. Build a network using your road layer (requires network analyst extension) Identify nearest polygon using point distance tool or near tool (or use existing point if known) Add nearest polygon point and postcode point as stops in the network solver then compute a route distance from your post code point ...


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Euclidean Distance is an ArcGis tool but can also be an operation in GRASS, QGIS or other software package... If I assume ArcGis I would say have a look at your environment settings especially Output Extent, CellSize and Snap Raster and set all three to your constant raster, but that would only be if you were using ArcGis. – Michael Miles-Stimson


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I think you're overcomplicating things here when you could use ST_MaxDistance, this will return the maximum distance between two points within two point clouds. WITH points AS( SELECT id, (ST_DumpPoints(lane.geometry)).geom as geom FROM lane GROUP BY id ) , min_distances AS( /*Finds the smallest distance for each distinct tuple ...



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