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There is the Travel time to major cities: A global map of Accessibility dataset which you can down here. This may not be exactly what you want as it is travel times to major populations but their methodology will help you create your own remoteness map.


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A strikingly similar Q/A is here. Their question discusses finding the shortest path from a point to a coastline and the answer to their question gives a bit more detail on how to use the GRASS v.distance tool. Give it a shot. Basically, input your points as the 'from' layer and the coast as the 'to' layer. A new vector map can be created with lines ...


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Have you tried the Points2One plugin mentioned in this post. You should be able to create lines, grouped by the point IDs. Once you have the line layer you could calculate a line length to get the distance between the two points. FYI - using the plugin on Mac created the line layer but wouldn't add it to my project, I thought it did't work but it does. You ...


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You are correct in that it calculates the distance between your points to the centroid of polygons/lines. You could: Convert your polygon to lines (Vector > Geometry Tools > Polygons to Lines) Convert your lines to points (Processing Toolbox > SAGA > Shapes - Points > Convert Lines to Points) Then run the Hub distances using your main points ...


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You can also use ST_PointN on the exterior ring of your polygon. SELECT ST_Distance(ST_PointN(geom, 1), ST_PointN(geom, 3)) dist FROM ( SELECT ST_ExteriorRing(geom) geom FROM my_polygon_layer ) a;


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Well I finally made it using array_agg() function after st_dumppoints(): SELECT a.id, st_distance(a.points[1],a.points[2]) FROM( SELECT c.id,array_agg((points).geom) as points FROM (select id, ST_DumpPoints(the_geom) as points from my_polygon_layer) as c where (points).path[2] = 1 OR (points).path[2] =3 group by c.id I don't know if there is a more ...


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The PostGIS extension of PostgreSQL contains an executable (shp2pgsql) to import shapefiles (.shp) to PostgreSQL. The pgRouting extension contains functions for the routing of networks (ways), such as pgr_dijkstra(). You could either write a stored procedure to do the automation or use python to access and automate the functions.


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You can add it as a point with fixed radius, it will create a circle of given radius and will have constant radius even on zoom var circlestyle = new ol.style.Style({ geometry: new ol.geom.Point(ol.proj.transform([parseFloat(lon), parseFloat(lat)], 'EPSG:4326', 'EPSG:3857')), image: new ol.style.Circle({ radius: 7, fill: new ol.style....


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Try this method-may not be the best but could limit your search space to a few and thus help you speeding up the process. Create half mile buffers around every point Dissolve the resulting buffers -ensure no multipolygons Any point lying outside this polygon is now excluded from the search space Make sure you have built spatial indices and verify if this ...


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I actually just did something like this not too long ago. Have a look at my answer to Finding distance between points in two different layers along route in ArcMap?. I used Python to find the distance along a line between two points that intersect each line.


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First of all what is your coordinate system? The people in your field are correct, the euclidean distance is the distance of a straight line between two points (also in 3 dimensions). When your coordinate system is a projected one it is usually a planar surface, thats also correct. But it is not correct to say it ignores surface curvature. You need to ...


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If you inverse the coordinates, it does not work (geopy uses (latitude,longitude) in the WGS84 crs) dublin = (53.33306,-6.24889) liverpool = ( 53.41058,-2.97794) print distance(dublin, liverpool).km 217.863019038 print(vincenty(dublin, liverpool).kilometers) 217.863019038 print(great_circle(dublin, liverpool).kilometers) 217.211596704 GEOS (...


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You can create a 0.5m buffer zone and then use the select by location tool (top toolbar under Selection). At the target layer you select the buffer and at the source layer prompt the other layer. At the spatial selection method you can select "are within the source layer feature".


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What about a buffer ? Does it works ? It's a better way to create that. You'll see all the points that you want.


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Perhaps the easiest way is using the near tool if you have the license. If you don't have the license then there are ways to code this functionality. Or you can possibly run a buffer of .5 m to create small polygons and then do a spatial join between the buffer and the point layers. Then you can select the points that share the same buffer feature ID.


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Disclaimer: I work for iGeolise To model travel times you can use the TravelTime platform API. It uses a range of transport and map sources to produce travel time isochrones including ATOC, DFT, TFL and open street map. The image attached is an example isochrone of all locations reachable within 45 minutes using public transport from Waterloo in London (...


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Yes, you can. You need to use the Geostatical Analyst's "Areal Interpolation" method in ArcGIS. This will give you a statistically sound "smoothed" / interpolated surface for your data.


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First create a buffer 10km from your lines, then either as @Micheal suggests select all the points that intersect the buffer (using the spatial query plugin) and then invert the selection. Or more directly select using isDisjoint (which is not intersects really).


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I'll try with a higher value for threshold, just to know if it works. However, I've finally solved my original problem (i.e. "build a raster with the shortest distance from every pixel to a city following a road") in four steps: 1- using 'v.distance' I've calculated the distance from the grid points to the road and the and the x and y coordinate of the ...


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There are a couple of versions of this tool. If you use the one from the Processing Toolbox, it will contain distances within the origin points. Instead, use the Distance Matrix tool from the menubar: Vector > Analysis Tools > Distance Matrix This version ignores calculating the distance of the origin points with itself.


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Please see my solution below, I'm sure I could amalgamate this into a more elegant solution. Step 1 involved creating a view of the distance for every school to every childminder CREATE OR REPLACE VIEW education.vw_childminder_distance AS SELECT all_schools."Dfes", all_schools."UPRN", all_schools."NAME", childminders.title, childminders.ofsted_urn, ...


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Solution below assumes: you are using ArcGIS v. 1.3 you are working from mxd, name of polygon layer is PGONS, it has unique name stored in field PGON_ID and you transferred coordinates of centres into PGONS table and stored in fields as shown below: arcpy.SpatialJoin_analysis("PGONS", "PGONS", "D:/Scratch/SJ.shp", join_operation="JOIN_ONE_TO_MANY", ...


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For FME it's best to have FME2015 or newer, because it has a new option for "Number of Neighbors to Find": Here I find the nearest three parks to a specific location. Notice I set Neighbors to Find = 3 and set a list name as ParkList. That list will contain the attributes of the three closest parks. I saved the above workspace as a template for FME 2016 ...



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