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Depending on the version/license of ArcGIS, you could use the 'XY to line' tool, in the 'data management\feature' toolbox. it produces a line feature from two sets of coordinates in a single table, which sounds like exactly what you are trying to do.


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Here's one way it can be done: Change your data frame to a projected coordinate system that makes sense for your data. Calculate Geometry on 4 new fields X_incident, X_engine, Y_incident, Y_engine to populate the coordinates, using the CS of the data frame. Don't use the default, which is the coordinate system of the data! Calculate distance field with ...


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If you project your data to a planar coordinate system in linear units (feet, meters) you could use the old pythagorean theorem. Note: This is not going to do the type of thing you'd get with network analyst (this will be euclidean distance aka "as the crow flies"). Lets say your fields are x1, y1, x2, y2. You'd create another set of fields and calculate ...


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Haversine is used for the great circle distance (shortest distance following the sphere curvature). So it does not take the height into account. For straight line distance, I would first convert your lat/long/radius+alt triplets to XYZ in a 3D cartesian system (see here). Then you can apply your equation. Because your points are very close from each ...


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You'll need river centreline and linear referencing to achieve this If you have to repeat task multiple time, I'll post a script that fascilitate chainage computation without linear referencing


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You could use the Distance to nearest hub algorithm from the Processing plugin which you could add your points and your lines layer instead of going through a query. From a couple of example layers that I have, you can get something like this: Then when you open up the Attributes Table for the output layer, you will be given the HubName and HubDist in ...


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if you need more advanced distance calculation, you should use the Path distance instead of the Euclidian distance. This allow you to account for the slope in the direction of the movement, which is necessary to adapt the true distance with respect to the elevation (using an elevation change as a cost raster does not work because this elevation change is ...


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Have you followed the instructions in the tool's help file? If the tool is grayed out, then you probably have not taken the first two critical steps. First, you must start an edit session. If your new points should be in the same database/file, then Editor > Start Editing will suffice. Otherwise you need to create a new database/file to hold your new ...


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Since you only have 5 points, the following won't take too long. Make sure your layer is editable. In the Construction Tools in the create features dialog, select "Point at end of line" Begin drawing a line from one of you points by clicking on the point. Right click and choose Direction/Length and enter the details. Repeat for the remaining four ...


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For anybody following this question, I've managed to answer it myself. I had edited all of the code correctly, however, if you wish to do this yourself, you will need to change the privacy setting of your table in cartoDB! I changed it from private to anybody with a link.


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On the assumption that you have an Advanced level license (you do not specify otherwise), I think you should try the Near (Analysis) tool: Determines the distance from each feature in the input features to the nearest feature in the near features, within the search radius. ... Both input features and near features can be point, multipoint, ...


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From a non scripting perspective, it would be fairly straightforward to do the following: Add two fields to each feature class: X1, Y1, X2, Y2 Calculate Geometry to populate the fields with the coordinates Join the two feature classes by common ID# Add a 4th field, DIST Field calculator with Python DIST = math.hypot(!X1!-!X2!, !Y1!-!Y2!)


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/* I use the approach described below in determining the next coordinate given the bearing and distance from previous coordinate. I have problem on accuracy with other approach I read from the internet. I use this in determining the area of land, which is a polygon, and plot that polygon in google earth. A land Title has bearings and distances written in ...


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If you want to measure in meters, switch the project CRS to a projection that uses metres, like the UTM zone of your part of the world. The layers can remain in the original CRS (something that SAGA presumably does not offer).


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You should be able to go into "project proprties/general" and check that "Canvas units (CRS transformation: ON/OFF)" is set to meters



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