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Please consider to use v.net.path - finds shortest path on vector network or v.net.alloc - allocates subnets for nearest centers. See also the list of available vector network algorithms. The v.distance command will find the shortest direct distance but you likely want to follow the network in order to obtain more realistic distances.


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I found the (or one) solution: One needs the Tool "Service Area" in Network Analyst. First, you need to have some necessary prerequisites: a) Set up a Network in Network Analyst. You need to have the Length of the roads/rivers/etc. as an attribute added while setting up the Analyst, name it e.g "Distance" b) You need a column in your location file which ...


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A non Arcmap answer. load your tables in PostGIS. Run something like: SELECT DISTINCT ON (pid) pid,rid,ST_Length(dist_line) dist FROM (SELECT points.id pid, roads.id rid ST_ShortestLine(points.geom,roads.geom) dist_line FROM points, roads) a LEFT JOIN rivers ON ST_Intersects(dist_line, rivers.geom) where rivers.id IS NULL ORDER BY dist; It will not work ...


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You need to turn your analysis to Raster. Try the Proximity analysis set of tools found in ArcMap http://resources.arcgis.com/en/help/main/10.1/index.html#//018p00000007000000 You can use the Cost Allocation tool to set the barriers http://resources.arcgis.com/en/help/main/10.1/index.html#//009z00000016000000


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I hope the following will contribute to a solution for you, but it isn't quite a cook-book answer. This attempt uses proximity tools and geometry comparisons to establsh the LEFT or RIGHT-side condition for the Locations Points. My initial reaction says to create a set of Buffer polygons from your streams and rivers polygons, using the Side Type (optional) ...


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Some things to consider: (1) Your problem is generally known as spatial interpolation because points are distributed in space, or surface interpolation because you are estimating the height of a point on a "surface" (which might be physical or abstract). (2) It's not generally a good idea to label to points in space as X,Y,Z because those letters are ...


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1 milla náutica es un minuto de arco. En el Ecuador y a nivel del mar eso equivale a 1852m/60=30,86666667m A 33,6º de latitud Sur cos 33º=0,83292 cos 33,6 * 30,866666667m = 25,709m por segundo de arco de longitud a esa latitud.


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If you points have unique ID's that you are trying to measure between: Point to Line tool Line field being the unique ID of the matching points Add length field to the lines output for the units you need.


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This bit looks to have been incorrectly copied: with arcpy.da.SearchCursor(ptFC2,["OBJECTID","SHAPE@XY"]) as cursor: for row in cursor: ptFC2XCoordDict[row[0]] = row[1][0] ptFC2YCoordDict[row[0]] = row[1][2] It should be: with arcpy.da.SearchCursor(ptFC2,["OBJECTID","SHAPE@XY"]) as cursor: for row in cursor: ...


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From here and here, the Hausdorff Distance is a measure of similarity of two shapes. I think that it returns the greatest difference between a node in one feature from another feature (anywhere on that feature's boundary, I think). The distance probably isn't that importance, but the relative distances are. Regardless, if you want it in meters, you could to ...


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Intersect your rail line and road line data using point as the output geometry type, then add the points to the network as cost barriers. See the second example on the help page.


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See this link for code (using GeographicLib) to compute the cross track distance to a geodesic. This does the ellipsoidal calculation and is accurate to 20 nanometers or so. Also look at "Calculation 2. Distance from a point to a line" on this site. This calculates the cross track path with Javascript and displays the result.


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If you need high accuracy distances, or "ground" distances, you need to convert your UTM "grid" distances (which you do indeed calculate via pythagorous) using a combined scale factor. This removes the distortion introduced by the combination of (a) reducing the horizontal distance at its elevated (above the ellipsoid) position on the earth and (b) ...


4

The best way I can think is to get two UTM points, convert them to Lat/Long, and compare their geodesic distances to their UTM pythagorean distance. E.g. Take a point from this example: The CN Tower is ... in UTM zone 17, and the grid position is 630084m east, 4833438m north. So if we take A (17n 630084 4833438) and move it 30 km east, we get B (17n ...


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If you need high-precision and robust geodesic measurements, use GeographicLib, which is natively written in several programming languages, including C++, Java, MATLAB, Python, etc. See C. F. F. Karney (2013) "Algorithms for geodesics" for a literary reference. Note that these algorithms are more robust and accurate than Vincenty's algorithm, for instance ...


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You do not mention your license level, but if it is Advanced I would recommend trying the Point Distance (Analysis) tool which: Determines the distances from input point features to all points in the near features within a specified search radius. However, if you have a Basic or Standard license then it is possible to achieve the same functionality ...


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1) Try using the NEAR function in the toolbox 2) Try using a Spatial Join 3) Try using creating "Euclidean Distance" rasters from each origin and then bringing these values into the points. 1 or 2 is most likely your solution.


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I am the developer of FlowMapper plugin. Hope you find it useful. Regarding your question: FlowMapper offers two types of flow length caculations: (i) for cartesian coordinates (e.g. UTM x y) (ii) for geographic coordinates (e.g. WGS84 easting northing) User must properly choose either CARTESIAN or GEOGRAPHIC calculation depending on the type of ...


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I get the solution of the problem directly from the developer of the plugin, I'll post here the answer I get: FlowMapper offers two options for distance caculation: (i) cartesian coordinates (e.g. UTM x y) (ii) geographic coordinates (e.g. WGS84 easting northing) As far as I can see, you are using geographic coordinates (x-y). Please check ...



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