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66

I have been meaning to ask this question for a while, but in a different form. This thread looks like a good place to share the motivation (and later I may ask the question I have in mind as a follow up). I make my living applying mathematics and statistics to solving the kinds of problems a GIS is designed to address. One can learn to use a GIS ...


40

How do you handle boring repetitive tasks? If the answer doesn't mention scripting or automating then you should be wary. Candidates should have come across a scripting language or macros at some point in a GIS course. What database experience do you have? Many GIS analysts become responsible for geodatabases - whether or not they wish to or are ...


30

Not really a full-blown GIS projects, but interesting example of situation when spatial aspects were not handled correctly. Economist's 'North Korea missile threat' first looked like: Whereas in reality should look like: Readers quickly pointed mistake and Economist admitted it and posted correction. (via Spatial Analysis blog) Edit: Some more info ...


23

I'd like to suggest two books. The first one is Learn to Think Spatially from the National Academies Press. It is actually about the nature and functions of spatial thinking and shows how spatial thinking can be supported across the K-12 curriculum through the development of appropriate support systems like GIS but it should give you an idea on how to ...


22

I love the Geospatial Revolution series of videos from Penn State University. It's a beautifully produced set of videos showcasing some everyday uses of GIS.


22

I am of the opinion that any course you have on your resume cannot be a bad thing. Your initiative to take a course to increase your knowledge can only be seen as a positive thing to prospective employers. I cannot speak to the value of the ESRI course but it will probably be of high quality. It will, however, be focused on python implementation within ...


21

You can start with Michalis Avraam's Essential Skills to Succeed in a GIS Career blog post. He grouped the skills into: GIS Skills Spatial Data and Algorithms understanding Data entry Data conversion Data maintenance: *Metadata creation and editing GIS Analysis GIS Workflow Model Building Cartography and Graphic Design Programming Skills Basic ...


17

You have two ways to go or a combination of the two: Open source route: Not as common in industry, but growing. It's mainly characterized by using opensource tools such as QGIS, PostGIS, GRASS, and associated libraries and extensions. There are workshops that you can get from various FOSS GIS websites on the matter. These workshops are usually done in the ...


17

I am a full time GIS Programmer for St Louis County Police (Missouri). The number one thing I work on are emergency management plans. Flood models, evacuation plans, security plans, critical infrastructure maps, sensitive populations, risk analysis maps (hazards overlayed with critical infrastructure and sensitive populations). My biggest project to date ...


16

You have your shape files, which the web browsers cannot read if you put them on a server somewhere. A user could download them and view them in an application but that's not what you want. So this is where GeoServer, MapServer, OpenLayers, PostGIS come into play. You would use PostGIS to store the data in your shape file as it's a spatial database. ...


15

I agree some of the thoughts already suggested. However to be very clear: do NOT teach the tool, teach the concepts. Yes, it's great that folks know how to use ESRI products (if that is what you are teaching) but give those same people another GIS, and they will struggle--they only know how to use the tool, not think through the process and understand what ...


14

A more complete list (the first answer mainly refer to OpenGeo stack, that is excellent, but there are plenty of other options out there): User Interface OpenLayers GeoExt (based on OpenLayers) MapQuery (based on OpenLayers) Leaflet Polymaps Mapstraction Modest Maps Wax Map Services MapServer GeoServer Mapnik FeatureServer QGIS Server Web ...


14

Getting a master degree might be a good thing for several reasons: You can position yourself as a person with higher qualifications (yet I have seen many organizations asking for diploma papers in Europe and many organizations who did not ask for any papers at all). You will learn a lot during your studies. Check carefully the curriculum - not all masters ...


13

Making attractive maps is always a challenge, and a bit of art. You need to serve the information in such way that it is easily understood and not tiresome. Too much information and you've lost the reader. Too little information and you cannot communicate you point. QGIS comes with its own cartographic composer which enables you to do many-many wonderful ...


12

Ask them about their love and passion of GIS analysis. What have they done out of intuition following a lead on a project? What kind of analysis have they done out of pure curiosity? and ask for specific examples


12

The answers that you are going to get for this question are going to be primarily based on personal experience and are also going to vary based on location and as such this question in its current form is not a good format for this site. That being said, in my country (United States) GIS full-time job requirements are normally (I'm generalizing based upon ...


11

I have a pretty math heavy background and have never thought of it as a waste. Geometry/Trig and algebra are a must. Arguments can be made whether Calculus is or isn't necessary (three years may be excessive, but I would say at least one year is good). Discrete Math is helpful for those who end up programming.


11

I think you are going to get a lot of differing opinions on this one. I had to take Calculus I and II (for a geology degree), and at the time, I suffered through them both. In hindsight, I really wish I would have taken more math courses. Not because I love math so much, but more because math really makes you think and learn how to solve problems in many ...


11

It looks like the Wayback Machine at the Internet Archive has a cached copy of the weekly outline page from Jun 29 2007. However, it looks like the links to the .zip and .py files used in the labs were not cached. I would also encourage you to contact the professor who ran the course and hosted the information on his webspace. It's likely Associate ...


10

Do NOT show someone something by taking the mouse away and saying, "Just like that". I often teach with projectors and have students follow and then practice on their own. Allow lots of practice time (if you can...), a rushed course is a crashed course. Teach slowly so that they can take the skills with them when they leave. Not just leaving thinking, "oh, ...


10

If all you want to do is produce Web-GIS applications then I'd recommend you take my GEOG585 course "Open Web Mapping" (https://www.e-education.psu.edu/geog585/). But I have to say that you may well benefit from the other courses in the certificate to help you get up to speed in why geography is harder than it looks. I see a lot of web development experts ...


10

The suite of FOSS tools in many cartographers' toolchests include: QGIS Inkscape GIMP Scribus R QGIS can handle the majority of vector and raster operations and most of the cartographic work. From a cartographic perspective, Inkscape and GIMP are primarily used to finish maps created within a GIS. Inkscape handles vector data, while GIMP is best suited ...


9

A course in statistics is a must. This will form a good base to understand geostatistics. Multivariate statistics courses would be very useful as well.


9

Here is one more: Eurocrats forgetting about Wales on the cover of Eurostat yearbook 2004 Reactions from BBC, Telegraph, and Mail. (via Spatial Analysis blog; image from GIT NEWS)


9

That is SonarWave Lite by Tekmap. It's free and can be downloaded from the preceding link if you have some SONAR data lying around that you want to play with. The company who makes it also appears to make heavy use of GRASS and GDAL - so you can consider SonarWave Lite to be GIS-based, but for a very specific application. EDIT: I looked a bit more into ...


9

The ELOGeo Repository has some good links with downloadable materials. Geoprocessing Videos from Esri offer downloadable videos, mostly from their Developer Summits. OpenGeo Education Center offers materials focusing mostly on web mapping using PostgreSQL/PostGIS, GeoServer and javascript (OpenLayers and GeoExt) Not really a workshop, but GISTutor is good ...


9

Dassouki's answer if very comprehensive - from the popular and technological perspective. I think its valuable to add that you can approach GIS from a non-programming perspective and still be very employable. This is the route that most geography departments at universities offer. If you take GIS as an undergrad in Geography, the school is likely teaching ...


9

You could work though my course (though there's no credit I'm afraid). It provides a 9 step plan to get you up to speed on some of the concepts that you seem to be struggling with.


9

I took a paid course through Geospatial Training Services, but I didn't pick up all that much. It was generally just: type this, type that. The course that really got me going was the Python course through Penn State's GIS Master's program. It's free, of high quality, and it makes you think. They give you several exercises to work through. Solutions are ...


8

I would also add to that comment, but suggest that keywords and concepts will have a longer lifetime than keystrokes and menu selections (ie buffer, clip, intersect, symmetrical difference and their synonyms). If using a GIS with a good help file, get students to focus on how to find the documentation within the software or online. The keywords/concepts ...



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