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I originally wrote this as a comment, but I think it addresses your first question. What do you want to ultimately achieve with your elevation model? I could explain why if you'd like, but I suspect you really don't need an Excel spreadsheet to achieve this, and in fact that is really not a good way to go about it (for one, 10,000 x 10,000 is already more ...


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A few days late, but here's a workflow that did what I needed. Open up qGIS ( http://www.qgis.org/en/site/ ) Set up your projection under project -> project properties (I use NAD83 / Alberta 3TM ref merid 114 W EPSG:3776 but hey whatever look you want try a few) and make sure on the fly CRS transformation is checked. Add your .shp : Layer -> add vector ...


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I suggest that you start from an existing raster DEM (such as NOAA 1 km DEM). Then you can resample it at a coarser spatial resolution (if it is too heavy, on my example I took 0.2 degrees) and convert it to ASCII (easy to import in an excel sheet), but maybe you can already use "as is". (For resampling, you can use gdal_translate). gdal_translate -of XYZ ...


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You do not say if you are in academia? If you are then the obvious place to go would be edina and digimap. If you are not then have a look here for free elevation data. Of cause you could go to OS the national mapping agency of the UK and get a 50m terrain model...


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Free of charge i would say: Get either ASTER or SRTM from earthexplorer. Both are available at 1 arc-sec., respectively ~20m vertical rmse.


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I encountered the same problem and I solved it by simply setting the "has_z" property to TRUE while creating the polygon geometry: arcpy.Polygon(my_array, my_spat_ref, TRUE). In the code below I update the z value of the vertices of my polygon fc taking the z values of a point fc. import arcpy arcpy.env.workspace = "my_path" point_fc="my_points_fc.shp" ...



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