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1

It sounds like the asker was able to answer their own question, but did so through an edit to the question. The solution was to use the Zonal Statistics as Table tool from the Zonal toolset of the Spatial Analyst toolbox. A link to the ArcGIS Resource Center article is here. The option for ALL was chosen for the Statistics Type.


2

The other answers cover the Spatial Analyst extension. Another option is the 3D Analyst extension. You can create a TIN from your contours, then convert the TIN to a raster, before calculating the slope.


0

import arcpy import numpy mxd = arcpy.mapping.MapDocument("CURRENT") df = arcpy.mapping.ListDataFrames(mxd)[0] anExtent=df.extent raster=arcpy.GetParameterAsText(0) desc=arcpy.Describe(raster) cSize=desc.meanCellHeight nRows=int(anExtent.height/cSize)+1 nCols=int(anExtent.width/cSize)+1 myArray = ...


1

Try using this, http://resources.arcgis.com/en/help/main/10.1/index.html#//0017000000m3000000 Turn the current data frame extent to a polygon via this extent = inFeature.extent extentPoly = drive + "\\NCT_GIS\\Projects\\Temp\\extentPoly.shp" # Array to hold points array = arcpy.Array() # Create the bounding box ...


-2

>>> myList=[3,9,15,1] >>> mX=max(myList) >>> mN=min(myList) >>> mX-mN 14


2

Use Get Raster Properties, specifically the MINIMUM and MAXIMUM values. In theory, this code should make a temporary raster layer using the display extent -- although I have not tested it, and am not sure whether it will work -- and then the raster properties tool will apply to only the raster currently shown in the display. import arcpy arcpy.env.extent ...


5

You first need to make a raster DEM from your contours. That requires the Spatial Analyst extension, and uses the Topo to Raster tool (Spatial Analyst | Interpolation toolbox). That elevation raster can then be used as the input for the Slope tool. Note that since this is an interpolation process, it is estimating the elevation values between the contour ...


0

In order to make a slope map you need to work with raster data. You will need to make a raster tile (ie: DEM) from your contours. With the output raster you will then be able to make a slope map.


0

You do not say what resolution of data you are looking for. The obvious place to look for UK data is the OS, our national mapping agency! They now offer free data called OS Terrain 50. I you are looking for higher resolution data for the UK and have money to spend then I suggest you look at NEXTMap


1

For the HEIGHT it would be with respect to ground. For the ELEVATION, most countries have a national geodetic survey that should be used as a reference. Those NGS are usually defining their own MSL. What you usually extract from an existing dataset is the elevation. The height can then be computed as the difference between elevation at the top and the ...


0

There might be other ways of doing it by now, but I found the most convenient way of converting from DXF to SHP (saving the DXF elevations as shapefile attributes) was to use gvSIG. N.


1

Normal convention in my locale is with respect to ground since elevation above MSL would be meaningless to the average user.


1

I came across this question, which boils down to your problem. Maybe you can try the suggested tool (dxf2xyz 2.0) to convert your dxf to xyz? The free tool apparently only supports AutoCAD version up to 2002, thus not suitable in your case. However, I found another tool allowing to convert between dxf versions (including yours). The trial version seems to ...


0

Generically... Convert the vector file to raster using the appropriate field Ensure that the extent and cell size of the output matches the raster file in the process reclass the NoData values to 0 add to combine the two files


2

To do this you would need a 3d Analyst and Spatial Analyst license. First, elevate your waterbody using Interpolate Shape, this will give the baseline for your elevations by attributing the polygon with the Z values from the DEM to each vertex. Build a terrain with your waterbodies as the elevation data source (perhaps buffer by a small amount and include ...


4

I had the same problem and tried James S' solution, but couldn't get the GDAL to work with Fiona. Then I discovered the SAGA algorithm "Cross Profiles" in QGIS 2.4, and got exactly the result I wanted and that I presume you are looking for too (see below).


2

It is handled by an esri geoprocessing service, which it is recommended that you update from the old service. The details page mentions plenty of good reference information.



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