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16

I do it all the time for my clients. Dump your data to FileGDB or Shapefiles then execute the following command: For ESRI Shapefiles: ogr2ogr -f "PostgreSQL" PG:"dbname=mydbname user=postgres" myshapefile.shp For FileGDB: ogr2ogr -f "PostgreSQL" PG:"dbname=mydbname user=postgres" myFileGDB.gdb For FileGDB, you need to make sure that the FileGDB ...


14

For a recent project working with several GBs of spatial data, I started the data loading / reprojections with FME. It worked well, but there is a learning curve. By the end of the project I was using Python scripts to automate the reamining processes. FME can be scripted, but if you have the Python basics why complicate things further? Python gives you ...


11

I'm pretty sure you can do this with Feature Class to Feature Class by re-ordering fields in the field map section of the tool. Edit: FC2FC doesn't do this but...ogr to the rescue. I just confirmed that ogr2ogr can do this. Specify your field name order on the -select switch. For instance, if I have a shapefile with two fields, "Name" and "FolderPath" (in ...


10

I'll talk only about what i've seen in a professional context. A student of mine worked with an enterprise tasked to receive, validate and integrate huge quantities of spatial data, from a well known source (TeleAtlas) into their GIS. She used several workflows using FME, doing very complicated verifications and tranformations on the fly, from a format to ...


10

To import shapefiles into PostGIS, you can use QGIS PostGIS Manager Plugin. It's a GUI for for shp2pgsql command line function. If you want to load KML files, you'd first have to convert those to shapefiles. This is simple: Just open the KML file in QGIS and save it again as shapefile. If you have multiple KML files, you might prefer using OGR Converter ...


7

I haven't tried this so can't verify it works, but the File Geodatabase API may allow you to export the data from file Geodatabase to SHP (and thence PostGIS). The documentation says: With the API you can... Read and write data


7

I love open-source but FME easily wins out against the opensource ETL's as best I can tell. It's actually quite cheap for maintenance and support too (at least compared to most other corporate solutions we have for things). If you're looking for translations between formats then OGR may do it (with some piping into GDAL for transformations). Of course, ...


6

Hallo I would import it to PostGIS first. There is tools to load multiple shapes to individual tables. QGIS spit extension is one. The new graphical shp2pgsql in PostGIS trunk or experimental binaries is another alternative. Or you could just write a batch script with shp2pgsql. I would start there, import everything to a schema called original or ...


6

Have a look at Spatial ETL softwares (Extract - Transform - Load), they are dedicated to such tasks. The most known is FME from Safe, but some open source (partial) alternatives are now available, like SDI (Spatial Data Integrator) and GeoKettle.


6

QGIS and shp2pgsql (and they are FLOSS) are probably most popular for Postgres/PostGIS database as underdark already said. There are probably some FLOSS tools for MySQL and Oracle but i'm not familiar with those. But if you have access to some commercial tools such as AutoCAD Map (via FDO) or Safe FME, you can import any spatial data to almost any spatial ...


5

Most of the simple operations can be carried out by these open source utilities ogr2ogr for vector gdal_translate and gdalwarp for raster Get FWtools http://fwtools.maptools.org/ and give it a try.


5

If you are using FME to do the data load, I think you may as well use it to read the original table and do the transformation stage. Then it's all in one process. If you do the work in Workbench then there are transformers for parsing, trimming, and concatenating. I won't say this is the best way, or compare it to any others, because I currently work for ...


5

If you look at blah238s duplicate link you find more information. I would say that Talend Open Studio and Pentaho GeoKettle is the most prominent open source solutions one can choose. Of these two Talend targets more than just ETL and GeoKettle a little more easy to use as far as I have read. My municipality are about to give GeoKettle a go as we are having ...


5

It seems to me that the main problem for you is to introduce some order to your tons of DWG/DXF files with information (in several layers). Regardless of choosing software/tool I can recommend you to describe your data. Here is some thoughts: You should develop some kind of unique codes for all types of your features. It can be one attribute or several or ...


4

The ET GeoWizards tool will do this, and it looks like the free version will do it without any limitations on the number of features.


4

My suggestion would be to pick 2-5 of your heavier used data layers (shapefiles) and migrate them to an rdbms. Investigate and implement workfows for those data. Getting used to the liimitations and requirements of rdbms vs file based data. Limitations include: required export, landing zone, coordsys, file type for collaboration. There are many benifits ...


4

FME is probably the best product to use in this space. After that it's GDAL/OGR. Another open source product in this space is geokettle - http://www.spatialytics.org/projects/geokettle/ although I have never used it in anger (being lucky enough to have both the other products mentioned). If none of those generic options work, you probably want to use a ...


4

autocad map 3d will easily geo-reference your dwg/dxf files and allow conversion to 12 gis formats. Unless you add FME desktop also (FME extsion for ArcGIS). Then with FME extended to arcmap and autocad you have all ~275 formats. But doing it through map3d you have access to some particularly useful tools. (i.e. select by layer, color, linetype, or even ...


4

Use the JSON Reader and then use a VertexCreator transformer. This transformer (which was previously called the 2DPointReplacer) will let you convert the X/Y coordinate values into a true spatial feature. Then you can simply write the data to your Geodatabase Writer. Make sure the Allowed Geometries field is set to geodb_point


3

As others have mentioned, there are many tools avaliable to perform these actions, from dedicated x2y style command-line utilities through high-end Spatial ETL tools. I personally use, and love the power of FME by Safe Software. It has paid for itself many times over in increased productivity. If proprietary/un-free software is an option for you, it's ...


3

I'd give ogr2gui (screenshots) a try, which provides a graphical wrapper around OGR, arguably the most powerful vector conversion library. In the long run, you'd help yourself becoming familiar with a command-line tools in this area, because of the great flexibility in OGR that isn't exposed through a simple GUI wrapper.


3

The QGIS "Table Manager" Plugin now also has the ability to perform this task easily with no command line necessary.


3

It sounds like you have some major batch processing and therefore, I would be inclided to script this. Doing this all by hand might be feasible but a pain. At least with a script, if you muck something up you can just correct the script and re-run. Also, you have a chance to unify a lot of the non-standard naming etc by using regular expressions and ...


2

FWIW work is going on to create a GDB to postgis loader. This depends on latest GDAL trunk which has GDB bindings. Haven't had a chance to compile and try myself but hope to before PostGIS 2.0 is out. check out - http://trac.osgeo.org/postgis/browser/spike/pramsey/postgis2fgdb You can probably give Paul a buzz on PostGIS newsgroup to find out where he is ...


2

While I have not tried it yet myself, I did just come across this tutorial (which is shapefile-->PostGIS) that uses the open-source geoETL software called "Spatial Data Integrator". I'm not sure if it supports Esri GDB or not, but it might be worth investigating further to see if you can use this product to make the similar conversion from GDB to PostGIS ...


2

Try the Regular Expressions. It has been some time since I've used FME, but I know a while back they had a Regular Expressions Transformer (or the AttributeSplitter had a Regular Expressions option). You should be able to use a regular expression to match some form of pattern. For example, the address: 123 abc st, Sesame Street could be matched by the ...


2

The esri file geodatabase API only works with file geodatabases created using 10.x - the older versions will not work with GDAL, QGIS or anything else that depends on the open file geodatabase API. The old Personal Geodatabases depend on MS Access and there are readers and code available. If you have a 10.x file geodatabase you can do this with a single ...


2

To convert your CAD files to GIS, you'll need to add georeference information to your cad files. If your CAD files are in some recognizable coordinate system, you can assign those to your files, otherwise you'll have to 'manually' georeference the CAD file to translate the local coordinates to a projected coordinate system. I found this nice guide [PDF] at ...


2

Have you looked at any other spatial ETL solutions? There are some open source solutions like GeoKettle and Spatial Data Integrator.


2

Arcgis Data Interoperability Extension (ADIE) "is" FME. That is to say. Esri has implemented the FME engine into their extension. FME Desktop for ArcGIS is a product sold by Safe software which adds more functionality to ADIE and can be "extended" to ArcGIS. Extended is a term that Safe Software uses to describe hooking or linking the software together. ...



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